Spring 2019 By Course Number

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The Emergence of Modern Europe: Renaissance to the Present

CAS HI 102 (4 credits) – Professor Clifford Backman

What is Europe? This course explores the emergence of Europe as an idea and place. Draws on literature and art from Machiavelli to Russian ballet to explain Europe’s changing meaning; focuses on nation- and state-building to explain Europe’s shifting boundaries.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 11:00:00 AM 12:15:00 PM IND SCI 109

The Emerging United States since 1865

CAS HI 152 (4 credits) – Professor Bruce Schulman

After the Civil War, Americans created a new urbanizing and industrializing landscape, flush with immigrants, growing class conflict, and racial divisions. This course explores how, through times of prosperity, depression, and war, Americans transformed the United States into one of the world’s leading nations. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Historical Consciousness, Research and Information Literacy.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 12:30:00 PM 01:45:00 PM LEC PHO 206

World History 1500-Present

CAS HI 176 (4 credits) – Professor Simon Payaslian

Examines the religious encounters, economic rivalries, and military battles produced by European imperialism in Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, and Asia since 1500. Analyzes how European colonialism came to dominate the world and nationalist movements succeeded in gaining independence. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 10:10:00 AM 11:00:00 AM IND CAS B06B

The Historian’s Craft

CAS HI 200 (4 credits)

Required workshop for majors, normally taken in the sophomore year. Gives students the opportunity to analyze original sources and engage with leading works of historical scholarship. Explores how historians reconstruct and interpret the past using creativity, deduction, and contextual analysis.

HI 200 A1 – Professor Louis Ferleger

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
T 12:30:00 PM 03:15:00 PM IND HIS 504

HI 200 B1 – Professor Alexis Peri

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
R 03:30:00 PM 06:15:00 PM IND HIS 504

History of Medieval Europe

CAS HI 201 (4 credits) – Professor Jon Westling

Traces the evolution of medieval civilization from the fourth to the fourteenth centuries. Emphasizes three main themes: the political and social development of western Europe, the evolution of Latin Christianity, and the role of popular culture.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 11:15:00 AM 12:05:00 PM IND KCB 102

Sacred and Secular Power in Christianity and Islam

CAS HI 213 (4 credits) – Professor Phillip Haberkern

Explores the relationship between sacred and secular power within the Christian and Islamic traditions, with a focus on how their foundational texts and earliest communities established models for negotiating the porous boundary between the sacred and the secular. Also offered as CAS RN 208.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 09:30:00 AM 10:45:00 PM IND CAS 214

History of Piracy

CAS HI 214 (4 credits) – Professor Clifford Backman

Examines piracy in European history from ancient time to the present, focusing on its economic and social causes, and its consequences. Addresses too the modern permutations of piracy as a form of social protest and a technique of terrorism.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 08:00:00 AM 09:15:00 AM IND KCB 101

Jews in the Modern World

CAS HI 219 (4 credits) – Professor Simon Rabinovitch

Examines how Jewish society, religion, and political definition changed in relation to how Europe, and the world, became modern. Considers Jewish interaction with non-Jewish society from medieval Spain to Eastern Europe today and explores this relationship’s creative and destructive products.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 01:25:00 PM 02:15:00 PM IND CAS 220

Cities and Cultures

CAS HI 226 (4 credits) – Professor Charles Dellheim

Examines the relationship between cultural expression and political, social, and economic change by focusing on cities such as Boston, Paris, London, Casablanca, and Johannesburg during times of intense creativity and upheaval.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 10:10:00 AM 11:00:00 PM IND KCB 103

The Great Powers and the Eastern Mediterranean

CAS HI 229 (4 credits) – Professor Erik Goldstein

The Eastern Mediterranean as center of Great Power confrontation. Its impact on wider international relations, the domestic political results, the role of sea power, and the origins, conduct, and resolution of wars. Also offered as CAS IR 325.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MW 10:10:00 AM 11:25:00 AM IND STH 113

Special Topics in the History of Media

CAS HI 230 (4 credits) – Professor Betty Anderson

Examines how newspapers, television, social media, tourism campaigns, textbooks, and other forms of media shape national identities, political goals, and cultural values over time. Topic for Spring 2019: Media Revolutions in the Modern Middle East. Examines how media revolutions in the modern Middle East have helped to garner state support and foment rebellions. Sources range widely from Lebanese civil war posters and state radio broadcasts to tourist campaigns, Turkish soap operas, and reality television competitions.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 11:15:00 AM 12:05:00 AM IND PRB 148

England in the Middle Ages

CAS HI 244 (4 credits) – Professor Jon Westling

England’s development from the Celtic Age to the Tudor dynasty. Emphasizes social and religious/intellectual changes within the broader context of England’s unique political evolution from a strife-torn backwater to a leading European power.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 02:30:00 PM 03:20:00 PM IND KCB 102

French Revolution and Napoleon

CAS HI 266 (4 credits) – Professor James Johnson

The French Revolution began with high ideals of liberty and equality but quickly dissolved into civil war, the Terror, and Napoleon’s expansionist ambitions. From the fall of the Bastille to Waterloo, this course traces the revolution’s successes, failures, and legacy.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 01:25:00 PM 02:15:00 PM IND CAS 116

The History of the Soviet Union

CAS HI 273 (4 credits) – Professor Alexis Peri

Examines the tumultuous history of Russia’s revolutions and its 74-year experiment with socialism. Explores the new revolutionary state’s attempt to create a utopia by re-engineering human bodies, behaviors, and beliefs, and the successes and failures of that project. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same number that was previously entitled “Russia and Its Empires Since 1900.”

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 12:30:00 PM 01:45:00 PM IND CAS B20

War: Myths and Realities

CAS HI 277 (4 credits) – Professor Cathal Nolan

The past may tell us about the future of war. Study the lessons of wars past to correct current falsehoods and persistent myths about war in the wider culture. Learn to separate popular myths from the realities of war. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Historical Consciousness.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MW 05:00:00 PM 06:15:00 PM IND CAS B18

Capitalism in America: Economic History of the US

CAS HI 292 (4 credits) – Professor Louis Ferleger

Surveys the history of corporations and private enterprise since the Civil War, disentangling the evolving relationships between business and government and tracing the influence of money, markets, and their managers in American communities from factories to the frontiers. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the title “Money, Markets & Managers: Economic History of the United States” that was previously numbered CAS HI 377.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 09:30:00 AM 10:45:00 AM IND CAS 228

History of the Civil Rights Movement

CAS HI 299 (4 credits) – Professor Andrew David

Through historical scholarship, oral history, documentary film, and excursions to local historic sites, this course explores how African Americans created a dynamic and multifaceted movement for civil and human rights from the 1950s to the present. Also offered as CAS AA 310.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 11:00:00 AM 12:15:00 PM IND CAS 214

Science and American Culture

CAS HI 302 (4 credits) – Professor Jon Roberts

Examines the rise of the natural and human sciences as influential forces in American society. Considers why they gained considerable authority in realms of medicine and technology but have proven far more limited in their impact on morality and religion.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 11:00:00 AM 12:15:00 PM IND HIS 504

American Thought and Culture, 1900 to the Present

CAS HI 306 (4 credits) – Professor Charles Capper

History 306 examines American thought in the 20th century when thinkers anointed their times “modern” and themselves “modernists” in revolt against the moral certainties and progressivist faiths of the 19th century. Four discourses driving this turn are spotlighted in the course’s first half: philosophical pragmatism, social science relativism, non-rational modern art, and debates over America’s role in the world. In the second half we consider post-World II conservative, multicultural, and postmodernist challenges to modernist norms in science, religion, liberal politics, and popular culture. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 10:10:00 AM 11:00:00 AM IND HIS 504

Internships in Public History

CAS HI 313 (4 credits) – Professor Jan Haenraets

Students undertake supervised work in Boston-area institutions dedicated to the public presentation of America’s past. Students meet with the instructor to discuss themes in public history theory and practice that, together with the internship experience and related readings, inform a final research project and class presentation. Also offered as CAS AM 313.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
W 2:30:00 PM 05:15:00 PM IND HIS 110

The American Revolution, 1750-1800

CAS HI 321 (4 credits) – Professor Brendan McConville

Examines America’s dramatic war for independence, situating the colonies’ struggles within a series of broader challenges in the Atlantic world. Also shows how Americans struggled, often violently, to create a stable republic in the aftermath of these truly revolutionary upheavals.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 12:30:00 PM 01:45:00 PM IND CAS 214

The Civil War Era

CAS HI 328 (4 credits) – Professor Nina Silber

What led to the US Civil War and how did Americans, North and South, black and white, male and female, experience this central cataclysm? What were its consequences and what has been its legacy? This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Historical Consciousness.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 11:15:00 AM 12:05:00 PM IND WED 140

Drugs and Security in the Americas

CAS HI 331 (4 credits) – Professor José Luis Velasco Cruz

(Meets with CAS IR 290.) Drug trafficking is one of the greatest threats to security and stability in the Americas. In this class, we study how drug trafficking became such an immense problem and why it has been so difficult to solve.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 12:20:00 PM 01:10:00 PM IND CAS 216

History of International Relations, 1900-45

CAS HI 332 (4 credits) – Professor Michael McGuire

What were the causes and the consequences of the two World Wars? What was the nature of political, economic, and military relations among the major powers of the world from the beginning of the twentieth century to the end of the Second World War? What was the effect of domestic factors (political, economic, religious, and ideological) on the foreign policies of individual states? Seeking to provide a genuinely multinational perspective on world affairs, this course will assess the ways in which powerful nation-states in this period competed and cooperated in the international system. Also offered as CAS IR 349. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Research and Information Literacy.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 03:30:00 PM 04:45:00 PM LEC STH B19

History of International Relations since 1945

CAS HI 334 (4 credits) – Professor Igor Lukes

The causes and consequences of the Soviet-American Cold War from its origins in Europe to its extension to Asia, Africa, and Latin America. The rise of the multipolar international system, the emergence of the nonaligned blocs, and inter- and intra-alliance conflicts. Also offered as CAS IR 350. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 350 or CAS HI 290.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MW 02:30:00 PM 03:45:00 AM LEC LAW AUD

America in Depression and War, 1890 to 1945

CAS HI 337 (4 credits) – Professor Andrew David

Examines how the modern United States was forged in the economic depressions of the 1890s and 1930s, and shaped by imperial and global ambitions beginning with the Spanish-American War and culminating with World War I and World War II.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 02:00:00 PM 03:15:00 PM IND CAS B06B

Political and Cultural Revolution

CAS HI 341 (4 credits) – Professor Simon Rabinovitch

Comparative historical analysis of modern and contemporary revolutionary upheavals and cultural change in Europe, the Americas, East Asia, Africa, Middle East, and the former Soviet republics. Examines the challenges posed by modernization, crisis of legitimacy, nationalism, imperial decline, and globalization. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 215. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Social Inquiry I, Critical Thinking.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 11:00:00 PM 12:15:00 PM IND KCB 107

Colonialism in Africa: Impact and Aftermath

CAS HI 348 (4 credits) – Professor Linda Heywood

Uses case studies of particular African societies or nations to examine patterns of European conquest and African resistance; forms of colonial administration and socioeconomic consequences of colonial rule; decolonization and contemporary African liberation movements; economic and political developments since independence; and contemporary social and cultural change.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 11:00:00 AM 12:15:00 PM IND CAS 220

History of Religion in Precolonial Africa

CAS HI 349 (4 credits) – Professor John Thornton

The study of the development of religious traditions in Africa during the period prior to European colonialism. An emphasis on both indigenous religions and the growth and spread of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in the continent as a whole. Also offered as CAS AA 382 and CAS RN 382.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 02:00:00 PM 03:15:00 PM IND AAS 101

Atlantic History

CAS HI 350 (4 credits) – Professor John Thornton

Examines the various interactions that shaped the Atlantic World, connecting Europe, Africa, and the Americas between 1400 and 1800. Begins by defining the political interaction, then emphasizes cultural exchange, religious conversion, and the revolutionary era. Also offered as CAS AA 385.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 09:30:00 AM 10:45:00 AM IND AAS 101

Environmental History of Africa

CAS HI 351 (4 credits) – Professor James McCann

Focus on the African environment and ecological systems over the past 150 years. Topics include climate change, hydrography, agriculture, deforestation, soil erosion, disease, conservation, famine, and the role of colonialism and government policy in environmental change. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Scientific Inquiry I, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Research and Information Literacy.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 03:30:00 PM 04:45:00 PM IND PLS 505

The Odd Couple: China and the USA, 1776 to the Present

CAS HI 367 (4 credits) – Professor Eugenio Menegon

The USA, a bastion of capitalism, and China, the largest communist state on earth, are the two major global powers today. It was not always this way, and the course will map three centuries of this complex historical relationship, filled with mutual admiration and misunderstanding. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Creativity/Innovation.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 11:15:00 AM 12:05:00 PM IND CAS 116

Turko-Persia in the Twentieth Century

CAS HI 382 (4 credits) – Professor Houchang Chehabi

The twentieth-century history of the non-Arab Muslim Middle East, i.e., Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan, and Central Asia. Analysis of the constitutional revolutions in Turkey and Iran, Kemalism, the Islamic revolution in Iran, and communism in the Soviet Union and Afghanistan. Also offered as CAS IR 328.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 11:00:00 AM 12:15:00 PM IND PSY B51

Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

CAS HI 393 (4 credits) – Professor Walker Robins

History of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, analysis of conflicting narratives through primary sources and film. Students present their own reflections on the conflict and debate possibilities of resolution. Counts toward majors and minors in History, International Relations, Middle East & North Africa Studies, and Jewish Studies.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 03:30:00 PM 04:45:00 PM IND CAS 116

Modern Latin America

CAS HI 397 (4 credits) – Professor Jeffrey Rubin

Struggles for equality and inclusion in Mexico, Argentina, Peru, Chile, Brazil, Venezuela, and Bolivia from the 19th to the 21st centuries.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 01:25:00 PM 02:15:00 PM IND CAS 228

Senior Honors Seminar 2

CAS HI 402 (4 credits) – Professor Sarah Phillips

The second of a two-semester seminar that guides students through the research and writing of an honors thesis grounded in primary historical research. Students participate in a workshop environment and are matched with an additional faculty advisor.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
F 11:15:00 AM 02:00:00 PM IND HIS 304

War in Film and Literature

CAS HI 408 (4 credits) – Professor Cathal Nolan

This course explores, through works of film and literature, human experiences of combat, suffering, and death. Topics range from medieval Japan to Africa, the Americas and Europe, WWI, WWII, and various “small wars” from the 19th through 21st centuries.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
T 03:30:00 PM 06:15:00 PM IND HIS 504

Society and Culture in Early Modern Europe

CAS HI 414 (4 credits) – Professor Phillip Haberkern

Examines selected topics in the history of Europe between the Renaissance and the Age of Revolution. The current offering focuses on the persecution of religious dissents, minorities, and witches; Wars of Religion; and the slow spread of ideas of toleration.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
R 12:30:00 PM 03:15:00 PM IND HIS 504

Topics in the History of Popular Culture

CAS HI 450 A1 (4 credits) – Professor Jon Roberts

Topic for Spring 2019: Horror and American Culture. Course relates the genre of horror as expressed in literature, film, and other media to both the primordial fears of individuals and the collective fears of American society as those fears changed over time.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
T

R

03:30:00 PM

03:30:00 PM

04:45:00 PM

06:15:00 PM

IND PSY

HIS

B55

304

The United States and the Cold War

CAS HI 465 (4 credits) – Professor Andrew David

Examination of U.S. Cold War foreign policy from its origins at the end of World War II to the collapse of the Berlin Wall and of the Soviet Union. Also offered as CAS IR 465.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
F 11:15:00 AM 02:00:00 PM IND HIS 504

Merchants, Pirates, Missionaries, and the State in Maritime Asia, 600-2000

CAS HI 482 (4 credits) – Professor Eugenio Menegon

Oceans connected the peoples of coastal Asia, Africa, and Oceania long before the arrival of Europeans in the 1500s. This course examines how commerce, piracy, religious contact, and imperialisms shaped maritime Asia, and how oceans facilitated our own era’s global connections.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
W 02:30:00 PM 05:15:00 PM IND HIS 304

The African Diaspora in the Americas

CAS HI 489 (4 credits) – Professor Linda Heywood

History of peoples of African descent in the Americas after end of slavery from an international framework. Examines development of racial categories, emergence of national identities in wake of the wars of independence, diverse Black communities in the twentieth century. Also offered as CAS AA 489.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
W 02:30:00 PM 05:15:00 PM IND AAS 101

Blacks and Asians: Encounters Through Time and Space

CAS HI 490 (4 credits) – Professor Ronald Richardson

Exploration of historical encounters between Africans and people of African descent, and Asians and people of Asian descent. How such people imagined themselves, interacted with each other, viewed each other, influenced each other, and borrowed from each other. Also offered as CAS AA 490.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
T 12:30:00 PM 03:15:00 PM IND STH 625

Empire and Power: British Foreign Policy, 1782-Present

CAS HI 533 (4 credits) – Professor Erik Goldstein

Examines the evolution of British foreign policy over time as well as the nature of Great Power rivalry. Key themes include formulation of national diplomatic strategies, policy coordination, diplomatic vs. military considerations, alliance politics, and policy over-stretch. Also offered as CAS IR 514.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MW 02:30:00 PM 03:45:00 PM IND IRC 220

The Prevention of Genocide

CAS HI 543 (4 credits) – Professor Simon Payaslian

(Meets with CAS IR 437.) Examines various approaches to and challenges in prevention of genocide, including ability of existing international institutions to develop early warning systems. Evaluation of effectiveness of unilateral military action and multilateral options at the UN and regional levels to stop genocide.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
W 02:30:00 PM 05:15:00 PM IND HIS 504

Places of Memory: Historic Preservation Theory and Practice

CAS HI 546 (4 credits) – Professor Daniel Bluestone

Covers key aspects of the history, theory, and practice of historic preservation. Preservation is discussed in the context of cultural history and the changing relationship between existing buildings and landscapes and attitudes toward history, memory, invented tradition, and place. Also offered as CAS AM 546 and CAS AH 546.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
T 03:30:00 PM 06:15:00 PM IND HIS 110

Nationalism in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries

CAS HI 549 (4 credits) – Professor Simon Payaslian

Explores the origins of modern nationalism as a major force, molding identity and motivating politics. Examines the relationship between nationalism, revolution, and war, as well as the challenges presented by ethnic revivalism, ethnonational conflicts, and globalization.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
M 02:30:00 PM 05:15:00 PM IND HIS 504

The Modern Metropolis

CAS HI 568 (4 credits) – Professor Brooke Blower

Cities such as New York, Paris, London, and Shanghai captured the worst problems and most exciting possibilities of the late-nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. This course investigates how urban spaces facilitated commerce, social life, and the forging of modern identities.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
T 12:30:00 PM 03:15:00 PM IND HIS 304

The History of Racial Thought

CAS HI 580 (4 credits) – Professor Ronald Richardson

Study of racial thinking and feeling in Europe and the United States since the fifteenth century. Racial thinking in the context of Western encounters with non-European people and Jews; its relation to social, economic, cultural, and political trends. Also offered as CAS AA 580.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
M 02:30:00 PM 05:15:00 PM IND STH 636

Morocco: History on the Cusp of Three Continents

CAS HI 595 (4 credits) – Professor Diana Wylie

Explores the range and limits of social mixture – cultural, political, economic – as three civilizations met at the northwest corner of Africa and influenced one another from the eighth to the twenty-first centuries.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
T 03:30:00 PM 06:15:00 PM IND PLS 505

Science and American Culture

GRS HI 702 (4 credits) – Professor Jon Roberts

From the colonial period to the present. Such topics as the American reception of Copernicus and Newton, scientific exploration, the interaction of science and religion, the impact of science on social theory, the rise of “big science,” and contemporary “science wars.”

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 11:00:00 PM 12:15:00 PM IND HIS 504

American Thought and Culture, 1900 to the Present

GRS HI 706 (4 credits) – Professor Charles Capper

Investigates how American thinkers brought about an intellectual revolution in three challenging moments: the naturalist revolt in pragmatic philosophy and modern art; progressive liberals’ confrontations with radicalism and new conservatisms; and post-structuralists’ uncertain leap beyond modernist science, religion, and humanities. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course entitled “Intellectual History of the United States, 1900 to the Present” that was previously numbered GRS HI 706.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 10:10:00 AM 11:00:00 AM IND HIS 504

History of Religion in Pre-Colonial Africa

GRS HI 749 (4 credits) – Professor John Thornton

Study of the development of religious traditions in Africa during the period prior to European colonialism. An emphasis both on indigenous religions and on the African roots and the growth and spread of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam in the continent as a whole. Also offered as GRS AA 882 and GRS RN 682.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 02:00:00 PM 03:15:00 PM IND AAS 101

History of the Atlantic World

GRS HI 750 (4 credits) – Professor John Thornton

Examines the various interactions that shaped the Atlantic World, connecting Europe, Africa, and the Americas between 1400 and 1800. Begins by defining the political interaction, then emphasizes cultural exchange, religious conversion, and the revolutionary era. Also offered as GRS AA 885.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 09:30:00 AM 10:45:00 PM IND AAS 101

Environmental History of Africa

GRS HI 751 (4 credits) – Professor James McCann

Focus on the African environment and ecological systems over the past 150 years. Topics include climate change, hydrography, agriculture, deforestation, soil erosion, disease, conservation, famine, and the role of colonialism and government policy in environmental change.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 03:30:00 PM 04:45:00 PM IND PLS 505

The Historian’s Craft

GRS HI 801 (4 credits) – Professor Charles Dellheim

Intensive training in the best practices of historical research, writing, publication, and oral presentation. Culminates in the production of a publishable journal article.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
R 03:30:00 PM 06:15:00 PM IND HIS 304

United States History 1830 to 1900

GRS HI 849 (4 credits) – Professor Nina Silber

Historiographic investigation of various central themes in nineteenth century US history, covering the years 1830-1900. Introduces students to scholarship on such issues as plantation slavery; abolition; Civil War; Reconstruction; and race relations after the Civil War.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
W 02:30:00 PM 05:15:00 PM IND HIS B06

American Historiography

GRS HI 850 (4 credits) – Professor Sarah Phillips

Examines the methodological and professional development of American historians since the 1880s, changes in the field since the founding period, and new directions in U.S. history.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
F 02:30:00 PM 05:15:00 PM IND HIS 304

Dissertation Workshop

GRS HI 900 (4 credits) – Professor Brendan McConville

A workshop designed for students writing a dissertation that provides them with critical responses to their work and addresses important issues associated with becoming a professional historian.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
T 06:30:00 PM 09:15:00 PM IND HIS 504