Fall 2019 By Course Number

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The Emerging United States to 1865

CAS HI 151 (4 credits) – Brendan McConville

Explores how the United States, at first only a series of borderland outposts, became a sprawling national republic. Investigates factors that brought Americans together and those that tore them apart, as they struggled passionately over racial, religious, and sectional values. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Social Inquiry I. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 11:15:00 AM 12:05:00 PM LEC CAS B12

World History to 1500

CAS HI 175 (4 credits) – Eugenio Menegon

Explores historical and environmental factors influencing how cultures take shape and impact each other. Examines early global connections and conflicts between people of different continents as well as between humans, other species, the natural environment, and the planet as a whole. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Critical Thinking. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 12:30:00 PM 01:45:00 PM IND PSY B55

History of Boston: Community and Conflict

CAS HI 190 (4 credits) – Andrew Robichaud

Explores the history of Boston and the city’s changes over time. Students work with archival objects, maps, and manuscripts. Topics include Native American history, colonial settlement, revolution, immigration, urban development, and race. Students visit nearby historical sites and museums. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, The Individual in Community, Teamwork/Collaboration. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 09:30:00 AM 10:45:00 AM LEC CAS 213

The Historian’s Craft

CAS HI 200 A1 (4 credits) – James Johnson

Required workshop for majors, normally taken in the sophomore year. Gives students the opportunity to analyze original sources and engage with leading works of historical scholarship. Explores how historians reconstruct and interpret the past using creativity, deduction, and contextual analysis. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 02:00:00 PM 03:15:00 PM IND WED 208

The Historian’s Craft

CAS HI 200 B1 (4 credits) – Diana Wylie

Required workshop for majors, normally taken in the sophomore year. Gives students the opportunity to analyze original sources and engage with leading works of historical scholarship. Explores how historians reconstruct and interpret the past using creativity, deduction, and contextual analysis. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
T 03:30:00 PM 06:15:00 PM IND HIS 304

History of Medieval Europe

CAS HI 201 (4 credits) – Ken Mondschein

Traces the evolution of medieval civilization from the fourth to the fourteenth centuries. Emphasizes three main themes: the political and social development of western Europe, the evolution of Latin Christianity, and the role of popular culture.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 10:10:00 AM 11:00:00 AM IND MET B02B

Europe Between Renaissance and Revolution

CAS HI 210 (4 credits) – Jon Westling

Surveys the key movements that transformed European culture, politics, and intellectual life between the fifteenth and eighteenth centuries: the Renaissance, Protestant and Catholic Reformations, new age of science and exploration, absolutism and constitutional monarchy, Enlightenment, and French Revolution. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 02:30:00 PM 03:20:00 PM IND KCB 103

Catastrophe & Memory

CAS HI 221 (4 credits) – James Schmidt

Examines the ways in which catastrophes, both natural and social, enter into cultural memory. Goal is to understand how events that seem to defy comprehension are represented in works of art and given a place in the memory of a culture. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness, Research and Information Literacy. Also offered as CAS PO 394. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 09:05:00 AM 09:55:00 AM IND CAS 324

Cities and Culture

CAS HI 226 (4 credits) – Charles Dellheim

Examines the relationship between cultural expression and political, social, and economic change by focusing on cities such as Boston, Paris, London, Casablanca, and Johannesburg during times of intense creativity and upheaval.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 11:15:00 AM 12:05:00 PM IND CAS 324

Media and Politics in Modern America

CAS HI 231 (4 credits) – Bruce Schulman

Examines how mass media have shaped the modern American political landscape, including electoral campaigns, voter attitudes, social movements, and war mobilization, as well as the ways public policy has structured both the news and entertainment media. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Historical Consciousness, Research and Information Literacy. Also offered as COM JO 523. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 03:30:00 PM 04:45:00 PM IND CAS 224

Reconstructing the African Past

CAS HI 237 (4 credits) – John Thornton

Explores the richness and diversity of a continent where oral histories and environmental settings have shaped society as much as written records. Considers Africa’s critical place in the world from ancient Egypt and Ghana to the Asante and Ethiopian empires. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the same title that was previously numbered CAS HI 347. Carries social science divisional credit in CAS. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 02:00:00 PM 03:15:00 PM IND CAS 315

Tudor England, 1485-1603

CAS HI 245 (4 credits) – Jon Westling

A survey of that turbulent and volatile century that witnessed the apprenticeship of England for a role of world importance. Special attention to the development of state power, the growth of religious diversity, the major economic and social transformations, as well as the resulting cultural development. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 11:15:00 AM 12:05:00 PM IND KCB 103

The Making of Modern Britain

CAS HI 247 (4 credits) – Arianne Chernock

How did a small island nation develop into a global superpower, and at what costs? This course charts Britain’s ascendancy in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, with a focus on industrialization, colonial expansion, democratic institution building, and enlightenment thought. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Critical Thinking. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 10:10:00 AM 11:00:00 AM IND CAS 222

Central Europe

CAS HI 278 (4 credits) – Igor Lukes

Intellectual, cultural, political, diplomatic, and military history of the region between Germany and Russia, from the end of the Middle Ages to the present. Also offered as CAS IR 341. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 05:00:00 PM 06:15:00 PM IND CAS 213

Experiencing Total War

CAS HI 279 (4 credits) – Alexis Peri

Analyzes how soldiers and civilians experienced WWI and WWII, which brutally penetrated their everyday lives and affected their bodies, vocabularies, and world-views. Major sources include combat accounts, diaries, letters, songs, material culture, food, and more. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course entitled “Intimate Histories of War” that was previously numbered CAS HI 279. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness, Creativity/Innovation. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 09:05:00 AM 09:55:00 AM IND CAS 222

The Twentieth-Century American Presidency

CAS HI 283 (4 credits) – Andrew David

Examines the shifting role of the presidency in American politics, especially over the course of the twentieth century. Considers not only the accomplishments of individual presidents and institutional changes in the executive branch but also the evolving place of the presidency in American popular culture. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 12:30:00 PM 01:45:00 PM IND CAS 315

History of War

CAS HI 284 (4 credits) – Cathal Nolan

Why do we make war? Nothing else so engages the human genius for creative destruction. From crossbows to nuclear fire, this course traces five centuries of war to uncover depths of depravity and cruelty and heights of sacrifice and suffering. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 05:00:00 PM 06:15:00 PM IND CAS B12

Politics of the American Environment

CAS HI 291 (4 credits) – Sarah Phillips

When have Americans addressed declining resources and ecological deterioration? Why hasn’t every environmental problem provoked a policy response? This course examines how debates over environmental rights and risks shaped U.S. political history from the country’s beginning to the present. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Social Inquiry I, The Individual in Community. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 11:15:00 AM 12:05:00 PM IND CAS 214

Capitalism in America: Economic History of the US

CAS HI 292 (4 credits) – Louis Ferleger

Surveys the history of corporations and private enterprise since the Civil War, disentangling the evolving relationships between business and government and tracing the influence of money, markets, and their managers in American communities from factories to the frontiers. This course cannot be taken for credit in addition to the course with the title “Money, Markets & Managers: Economic History of the United States” that was previously numbered CAS HI 377. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 08:00:00 AM 09:15:00 AM IND CAS 324

African American History

CAS HI 298 (4 credits) – Paula Austin

Surveys the history of African Americans from their African origins to the present, investigating their critical role in shaping the meaning of race, rights, freedom, and democracy during slavery, reconstruction, Jim Crow, and the civil rights era. Also offered as CAS AA 371.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 12:30:00 PM 01:45:00 PM IND MUG 205

American Popular Culture

CAS HI 300 (4 credits) – Brooke Blower

Examines how Americans have changed (and haven’t) since the nineteenth century by exploring their curious beliefs, social and sexual practices, and changing understandings of selfhood. Topics include Victorian etiquette, modern city pleasures, racial stereotyping, dating rituals, family dynamics, and more. This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness, Critical Thinking. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 11:00:00 AM 12:15:00 AM IND CAS 203

Women and Gender in US History

CAS HI 301 (4 credits) – Nina Silber

Examines the ideas and experiences of women in the United States from the 1600s through the late twentieth century. Considers the common factors that shaped women’s lives as well as women’s diverse class, ethnic, and regional experiences. This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area(s): Historical Consciousness, Critical Thinking. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 02:00:00 PM 03:15:00 PM IND CAS 222

Sex, Love, Family: Relationships in Recent American History and Pop Culture

CAS HI 303 (4 credits) – Brooke Blower

Explores modern American romance and family dynamics, especially since the 1970s. Follows the life cycle from birth to death, surveying common milestones and rituals such as coming of age, coming out, getting married, or having a midlife crisis, and more. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Digital/Multimedia Expression. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 03:30:00 PM 04:45:00 PM IND CAS 211

Science and Religion: Dialogue and Debate

CAS HI 304 (4 credits) – Jon Roberts

Challenges conventional wisdom that science and religion have always been at war in Europe and North America. Explores their interactions, mutual existence, and conflict from Copernicus’ claim that the earth revolved around the sun to contemporary debates about evolution. Also offered as CAS RN 369.  Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Social Inquiry I. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 11:15:00 AM 12:05:00 PM IND CAS B06B

American Thought and Culture, 1776-1900

CAS HI 305 (4 credits) – Charles Capper

History 305 examines how major American thinkers and intellectual movements of the “long nineteenth century” constructed an “exceptional” national identity by adjusting their culture’s provincial Protestant and Enlightenment traditions to the challenges of transnational democratic, Romantic, and secular modes of thinking. Specific topics include Transcendentalism, evangelical and liberal Protestantism, pro- and anti- slavery arguments about “freedom,” race and gender theory, philosophical idealism, literary realism, scientific Darwinism, and evolutionary social science. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 09:30:00 AM 10:45:00 AM IND HIS 504

Understanding Revolution: France and Algeria

CAS HI 320 (4 credits) – Diana Wylie

Freedom! Liberty, equality, fraternity! National liberation! These slogans have inspired violent revolutions around the world. What do they really mean, and what have they really led to? We will investigate these questions by role-playing and historical analysis of two case studies: the French Revolution (1789-1794) and the Algerian Revolution (1954-62). Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Writing-Intensive Course. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 12:30:00 PM 01:45:00 PM IND CAS B06A

The Gilded Age, 1877-1914

CAS HI 329 (4 credits) – Louis Ferleger

Examines the economic, social, cultural and political transformation from the end of the Reconstruction until 1914. Specific focus on the industrial revolution, foreign policy, the nation state, the metropolis, and conflicts that emerged in American society during the Gilded Age. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 09:30:00 AM 10:45:00 PM IND HIS 304

Drugs and Security in the Americas

CAS HI 331 (4 credits) – Rachel Nolan

(Meets with CAS IR 290.) Drug trafficking is one of the greatest threats to security and stability in the Americas. In this class, we study how drug trafficking became such an immense problem and why it has been so difficult to solve. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Ethical Reasoning. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 09:05:00 AM 09:55:00 AM IND PHO 205

Cold War America, 1945-68

CAS HI 338 (4 credits) – Andrew David

Investigates how the ideological and strategic Cold War between the United States and the Soviet Union shaped American society. Emphasis on the consensus in domestic opinion, the civil rights movement, political and cultural dissent, and the road to Vietnam. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 03:30:00 PM 04:45:00 PM IND CAS 324

A History of the Present: The United States since 1968

CAS HI 339 (4 credits) – Bruce Schulman

Analyzing the recent experience of the United States and its people in historical perspective, the course allows students to explore important developments in US politics, race relations, economy, and popular culture, investigate diverse social science approaches to contemporary problems, and develop an independent research project. Topics include war, politics, religion, and popular culture as well as changing notions about race, gender, and selfhood. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Social Inquiry II, Research and Information Literacy. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 11:00:00 AM 12:15:00 PM IND CAS 213

Taste, Culture, and Power: The Global History of Food

CAS HI 343 (4 credits) – Benjamin Siegel

An exploration of the global history of food from prehistory to the present, considering the birth of agriculture, food in nations and empires, hunger and nutrition, and the future of eating, including examples from Asia, Africa, Europe, and the Americas. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Digital/Multimedia Expression, Creativity/Innovation. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 09:05:00 AM 09:55:00 AM IND CAS 214

Twentieth-Century European Thought and Culture

CAS HI 358 (4 credits) – James Johnson

This course treats artistic, musical, literary, political, and philosophical works historically. Among its large themes are modernism and the discovery of the unconscious, the cultural effects of both World Wars, democracy and its critics, totalitarian culture, existentialism, and postmodernism. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub area: Historical Consciousness. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 11:00:00 AM 12:15:00 PM IND CAS 222

European Dimensions of the Black Diaspora

CAS HI 360 (4 credits) – Linda Heywood

Explores writings about the Black experience in Europe since the 1800s through examinations of historical and literary works, artistic and folkloric depictions, as well as politics and sports in England, France, Germany, Russia, and the Netherlands. Also offered as CAS AA 380. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 03:30:00 PM 04:45:00 PM IND AAS 101

Introduction to Modern Japanese History

CAS HI 369 (4 credits) – Ronald Richardson

Developments from late Tokugawa Japan and the Meiji Restoration (1868) to the present. Focus on Japan’s economic, political, and social adjustment to modern times, the evolution of twentieth century Japanese imperialism, and Japan’s growth after World War II. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
T 12:30:00 PM 03:15:00 PM IND STH 625

The Armenian Genocide

CAS HI 380 (4 credits) – Simon Payaslian

Examines the emergence of the Armenian Question in the Ottoman Empire as a national and international issue. Analysis of Armenian-Turkish relations after the Young Turk revolution in 1908. Focuses on the processes of genocide, survivor memory, and international responses. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 09:30:00 AM 10:45:00 PM IND CAS B06B

History of Genocide

CAS HI 384 (4 credits) – Simon Payaslian

History and comparative analysis of genocidal mass murder with focus on the twentieth century. Hereros, Armenians, holomodor, Holocaust, Cambodia, Rwanda, Darfur. Attention to political leaders, state ideology, dehumanization of victim groups, geopolitical competition, war, empire building and decline. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 02:00:00 PM 03:15:00 PM IND CAS 324

Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

CAS HI 393 (4 credits) – Ingrid Anderson

History of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, analysis of conflicting narratives through primary sources and film. Students present their own reflections on the conflict and debate possibilities of resolution. Counts toward majors and minors in History, International Relations, Middle East & North Africa Studies, and Jewish Studies. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 11:00:00 AM 12:15:00 PM IND KCB 104

Senior Honors Seminar 1

CAS HI 401 (4 credits) – Andrew Robichaud

The first of a two-semester seminar that guides students through the research and writing of an honors thesis grounded in primary historical research. Students participate in a workshop environment and are matched with an additional faculty advisor. Honors program application available here. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
F 11:15:00 AM 02:00:00 PM IND HIS 304

Monarchy in Modern Britain

CAS HI 434 (4 credits) – Arianne Chernock

A seminar probing seminal moments in the history of modern British sovereignty, when the politics of the court intersected with the politics of the people. Particular consideration is given to how monarchy has survived as an institution. Also offered as CAS WS 434. Effective Fall 2019, this course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Critical Thinking. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
M 02:30:00 PM 05:15:00 PM IND HIS 304

Topics in Popular Culture

CAS HI 450 B1 (4 credits) – Paula Austin

Race, Gender, and Representation. From abolitionism and women’s suffrage to workers’ rights and the Movement for Black Lives, this seminar examines marginalized and minoritized peoples’ mobilization of visual and print media to clapback and correct pervasive stereotypes and misrepresentations in popular culture. Also offered as CAS AA 400.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
R 03:30:00 PM 06:15:00 PM IND HIS 304

War and American Society, 1607-2001

CAS HI 454 (4 credits) – Brendan McConville

Although committed to democracy, individual liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, Americans have frequently found themselves waging war. This course examines how war mobilization and the experience of combat since the settling of Jamestown have fundamentally changed American society.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
W 02:30:00 PM 05:15:00 PM IND HIS 504

The Theater of History

CAS HI 480 (4 credits) – Ronald Richardson

A practical workshop in the uses of history as source for theatrical productions including narrative films, television and other forms of performance arts, including dance, and the uses of such creative engagement as modes of historical imagination. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
M 02:30:00 PM 05:15:00 PM IND STH 625

The Making of Modern China, 1600 to the Present

CAS HI 487 (4 credits) – Eugenio Menegon

Explores continuity and change between later imperial China and the Republican and Communist eras. Examines family and gender structures, ethnic classifications, and military traditions in late dynastic times and how revolution brought change from within and abroad. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
T 03:30:00 PM 06:15:00 PM IND HIS 504

Enlightenment and Its Critics

CAS HI 514 (4 credits) – James Schmidt

Explores how eighteenth-century criticisms of the Enlightenment have been taken up by twentieth-century thinkers such as Heidegger, Horkheimer, Adorno, Gadamer, and Foucault; discusses recent defenses of Enlightenment ideals of reason, critique and autonomy by Habermas and others. Also offered as CAS PO 592 and CAS PH 412. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
W 02:30:00 PM 05:15:00 PM IND MUG 424

World War II: Causes, Course, Consquences

CAS HI 537 (4 credits) – Cathal Nolan

Hitler, Mussolini, Tojo, Churchill, Roosevelt, Stalin, and 75 million ordinary and extraordinary dead. From 1939-1945, the whole world waged total war in cruel ways unknown to any history before or since. Explore the causes, course, and consequences of these events. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
R 12:30:00 PM 03:15:00 PM IND HIS 504

Comrades & Competitors: US and Soviet Cultural Exchange

CAS HI 541 (4 credits) – Alexis Peri

Many of attitudes that color US-Russia relations today come from their history of friendship and enmity in the 20th century. This seminar investigates US-Soviet culture wars, which shaped not only each society’s “way of being,” but also international relations. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
M 02:30:00 PM 05:15:00 PM IND HIS 504

Protest and Resistance in the Americas

CAS HI 582 (4 credits) – Jeffrey Rubin

How do ordinary people rise up to challenge economic exploitation, racism, police violence, and environmental harm? This course examines protest movements in Brazil, Chile, Venezuela, Guatemala, Mexico, and the US from the Mexican Revolution to Black Lives Matter. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
T 12:30:00 PM 03:15:00 PM IND HIS 504

Labor, Sexuality, and Resistance in the Afro-Atlantic World

CAS HI 584 (4 credits) – John Thornton

The role of slavery in shaping the society and culture of the Afro-Atlantic world, highlighting the role of labor, the sexual economy of slave regimes, and the various strategies of resistance deployed by enslaved people. Also offered as CAS AA 514. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
M 02:30:00 PM 05:15:00 PM IND AAS 101

Women, Power, and Culture in Africa

CAS HI 588 (4 credits) – Linda Heywood

Understanding the role of women in African history. Topics include the Atlantic slave trade, power, religion, the economy, resistance movements, health, the state, and kinship. Emphasis on the period before independence. Also offered as CAS AA 588. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
W 02:30:00 PM 05:15:00 PM IND AAS 101

African American History

GRS HI 698 (4 credits) – Paula Austin

Surveys the history of African Americans from their African origins to the present, investigating their critical role in shaping the meaning of race, rights, freedom, and democracy during slavery, reconstruction, Jim Crow, and the civil rights era. Also offered as GRS AA 871.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 12:30:00 PM 01:45:00 PM IND MUG 205

Science and Christianity

GRS HI 704 (4 credits) – Jon Roberts

Examines the relationship between science and the Christian tradition in Europe and North America since 1500. Considers the epistemological and metaphysical foundations of both science and Christian thought as they have evolved over time. Also offered as GRS RN 669. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
MWF 11:15:00 AM 12:05:00 AM IND CAS B06B

American Thought and Culture, 1776 to 1900

GRS HI 704 (4 credits) – Charles Capper

Examines how intellectuals constructed an “exceptional” American identity by adjusting provincial Protestant and Enlightenment traditions to the challenges of transnational democratic, Romantic, and secular thought. Topics include Transcendentalism, pro- and anti-slavery movements, philosophical idealism, literary realism, and Darwinian theories. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 09:30:00 AM 10:45:00 PM IND HIS 504

The Armenian Genocide

GRS HI 780 (4 credits) – Simon Payaslian

Examines the emergence of the Armenian Question in the Ottoman Empire as a national and international issue. Analysis of Armenian-Turkish relations after the Young Turk revolution in 1908. Focuses on the processes of genocide, survivor memory, and international responses. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
TR 09:30:00 AM 10:45:00 PM IND CAS B06B

European Historiography

GRS HI 800 (4 credits) – Charles Dellheim

Examines historical writing about Europe through changing trends in method and approach.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
W 02:30:00 PM 05:15:00 PM IND HIS 304

Topics in American Cultural History

GRS HI 857 (4 credits) – Paula Austin

Readings seminar focusing on American culture, broadly defined, in various periods of American history. Readings consist of both primary documents and secondary sources relevant to the specific topic. Topic for Fall 2019: Race, Gender, and Representation. From abolitionism and women’s suffrage to workers’ rights and the Movement for Black Lives, this seminar examines marginalized and minoritized peoples’ mobilization of visual and print media to clapback and correct pervasive stereotypes and misrepresentations in popular culture.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
R 03:30:00 PM 06:15:00 PM IND HIS 304

African Historiography

GRS HI 870 (4 credits) – James McCann

Examines historical writing about the African continent through key trends in the study of themes and regional historiographies. Also highlights recent works in the field. Syllabus

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
M 02:30:00 PM 05:15:00 PM IND PLS 505

Dissertation Workshop

GRS HI 900 (2 credits) – Jon Roberts

A workshop designed for students writing a dissertation that provides them with critical responses to their work and addresses important issues associated with becoming a professional historian.

Days Start End Type Bldg Room
M 06:30:00 PM 09:15:00 PM IND HIS 504