Summer Course Offerings at BU

Summer 2015

The Department of Religion does not offer graduate level courses during summer sessions.  However, students may be interested in taking courses offered in other relevant departments.  Please see the official Summer Term website for full course listings, details and availability. 

Session 1 (May 19-June 26)

Elementary Modern Arabic (Modern Arabic 1)
CAS LY 111

The essentials of standard Arabic, the idiom used in public communications throughout the Arab world. Listening, speaking, reading, writing. 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 10:30 am-1 pm
Giselle Khoury

First-Semester French
CAS LF 111

A multimedia approach for students who have never studied French. A variety of communicative tasks develop speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 9-11:30 am
Nicholas Huckle

Second-Semester French
CAS LF 112

Prereq: (CAS LF 111) or placement test results. Continues CAS LF 111. A multimedia approach which develops speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills, together with the grammar and vocabulary needed for more complex communicative tasks. 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 9-11:30 am
Katherine Lakin-Schultz

Third-Semester French
CAS LF 211

Prereq: (CAS LF 112) or placement test results. Authentic literary selections by writers from diverse Francophone countries, cultural readings, and discussion of short-subject films by francophone filmmakers, accompanied by advanced study of grammar and emphasis on communicative skills. 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 11 am-1 pm
Davina Mattox

Fourth-Semester French
CAS LF 212

Prereq: (CAS LF 211) or placement test results. Refines the four skills through in-depth study of a modern novel. Creative oral and written exercises based on the novel and study of advanced grammar. Viewing of contemporary French films. Fulfills CAS language requirement, prepares for further study (LF 303). 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 11 am-1 pm
Leslie Hawkes

French Composition and Conversation I
CAS LF 303

Prereq: (CAS LF 212) or 4 semesters of college French for non-BU students or placement test results. Intensive practice using and understanding written and spoken French. Discussion of literary texts, cultural themes, films, and current events. Review of advanced grammar. Counts for the major and minor. Prepares students for CAS LF 350 and language immersion Study Abroad programs. 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Tues./Thurs. 10 am-12:30 pm
Irit Kleiman

Introduction to Analysis of French Texts
CAS LF 350

Prereq: (CAS LF 303) or 5 semesters of college French for non-BU students or placement test results. Develops techniques and skills for use in reading and interpreting French literary texts. Special attention to lyric poetry, theater, and short narratives. Theme for Summer 2015: “Freedom.” Required for French Studies majors, counts for minor. Carries CAS humanities divisional credit. 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Tues./Thurs. 2-4:30 pm
Irit Kleiman

First-Semester German
CAS LG 111

For beginners or according to placement examination results. Introduction to grammar, vocabulary, and structure of German, emphasizing the four basic skills: speaking, writing, listening, and reading. 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 9-11:30 am
Abigail Gillman

The Gospel of John
STH TN 806

The purpose of this study of the Fourth Gospel is to acquaint the student with this work from the later New Testament period in a way that provides understanding of and the capacity for criticism of the text involved (in addition to some non-canonical Johannine literature, e.g., the Gnostic Apocryphon of John). Appreciation for both the unity and the diversity within the Johannine literature should increase during this study. 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Wed. 6-10 pm
Robert Hill

The Judiciary and Civil Liberties
CAS PO 508

First Amendment rights of speech, press, assembly, religion; rights of defendants in criminal cases; and the constitutional protection of racial minorities. Supreme Court decision-making processes and modes of compliance with its decisions are also considered. 4 cr.
A1 Tues./Thurs. 1-4:30 pm
David Glick

Beginning Latin 1
CAS CL 111

Introduction to grammar, forms, and vocabulary of classical Latin. Beginners only. 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Tues./Thurs./Fri. 9-11 am
Rachel Fisher

Intermediate Latin 1: Prose
CAS CL 211

Prereq: (CAS CL 112) or equivalent. Reading of selections from Latin prose. Authors read may include Caesar, Cicero, Livy, Petronius, and Pliny. 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Tues./Wed. 1-3:30 pm
Daniel Libatique

Leading Spiritual Formation Ministries
STH TC 809

This course provides a context to explore preparing and leading forms of spiritual formation ministries in diverse settings. It is grounded in the assumptions that (1) all aspects of life provide opportunities for strengthening our spiritual journey, and (2) a key task of the spiritual leader is to facilitate experiences that can help people make those connections. The course offers guidance and practice in designing and leading such experiences, including retreats, small groups, and spiritual guidance. Foundations for spiritual formation ministries for children, youth, and families are also considered. Participants explore and reflect upon a variety of disciplines that ground and inform such leadership. A key task of the course is providing an opportunity for participants to identify and critically reflect upon their own theological and pedagogical perspectives and how those influence their practice of ministry. 4 cr.
A1 Tues./Thurs. 9:30 am-1 pm
Wanda Stahl

The Middle East Today
CAS IR 511

A critical survey of the rise and development of modern nations, states, and economies in the Middle East and North Africa since 1900 that provides context and perspective essential for understanding contemporary issues (e.g., peace process, gender relations, religion’s roles, democracy). 4 cr.
A1 Tues./Thurs. 1-4:30 pm
Gregory Aftandilian

Psychodynamics of Marriage and Family
STH TY 826/TY 926

Introductory course that includes a comprehensive overview of the field of family systems and family therapy. Serves as an introduction to the theory and techniques of couples and family therapy. An attempt is made to integrate theory and practice through assignments, class activities, and personal and professional self-reflection. Students have the opportunity to reflect upon how they might actually use course content professionally in their respective disciplines. 4 cr
A1 Mon./Wed. 4-7:30 pm
Steven Sandage

Queer Theology
STH TT 849

Examines the emergence of queer theology as it has been derived from queer theory and LGBTQ social justice activists. Acquaints students with the history of the term “queer,” its challenges, its reappropriation, and the impact queer theology is having on Christian faith and practices. We especially investigate how “queering” may contribute to theology as an academic discipline, church practice, and as an instrument of social justice. This course will privilege an intersectional analysis. 4 cr.
A1 Tues./Thurs. 9 am-12:30 pm
Pamela Lightsey

Special Topics in Sociology
MET SO 501

Topic for Summer 2015: A Social History of Boston’s North End. A socio-cultural history of Boston’s North End that examines changes in the area from the first Puritan settlement to the current period of gentrification, with central attention given to the dynamics of culture change among the Italian immigrants. Covers the impact of global changes on local processes, changes in American notions of identity and inclusion, and ethnic succession and competition; religious change, social organization, and Catholic festivals; William Foote Whyte’s “Street Corner Society”; the image of Italians as criminals, and myths and realities of “the Mafia”; the impact of drugs and drug violence in the North End in the 70s and 80s; demographic change, tourism, food marketing, and gentrification. Course includes two visits to the North End, including dinner in a North End restaurant on the final night of the course. 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Wed. 6-9:30 pm
James Pasto

Spiritual Autobiographies
STH TC 529/TC 829

From Augustine to Teresa of Avila, Jarena Lee to Gandhi, spiritual autobiographies reveal diverse paths of religious seekers, the crises and epiphanies that became focal points of meaning, discernment, and revelation. In the course, we study a sampling of spiritual autobiographical writing across diverse historical, religious, and cultural contexts. Students also engage in the process of life writing and have the opportunity to participate in a writing group to share and reflect upon their writing. Students have the option to explore practical uses of spiritual autobiography in pastoral ministry, spiritual direction, retreat facilitation, and work with specific ages and communities. 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs./Fri. 10 am-5 pm
Claire Wolfteich
Note: Non-standard course dates of May 20-May 29

 

Session 2 (June 29 – August 7)

Elementary Modern Arabic (Modern Arabic 2)
CAS LY 112

Prereq: (CAS LY 111). The essentials of standard Arabic, the idiom used in public communications throughout the Arab world. Listening, speaking, reading, writing. 4 cr.
B1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 10:30 am-1 pm
Ikram Easton

Biblical Interpretation from Hispanic and Latin American Perspectives
STH TO 838

Provides an introduction to the contexts, assumptions, and methods of Hispanic and Latin American Biblical exegeses and their contributions to Biblical and Religious Studies. Course objectives are: 1) to develop an awareness of the Hispanic and Latin American approaches to the Bible, their differences, and points of contact; 2) to understand the different assumptions of the Hispanic and Latin American interpretations of the Bible; 3) to develop intercultural exegetical skills and cross-cultural sensitivity; and 4) to experience and develop an understanding of the reality of US Hispanics and Latin Americans through learning about their history, economy, and political, social, and religious experiences. Selected passages from the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament are analyzed in terms of the cultural and historical situations of Latin Americans and Hispanic peoples in the United States. Open to undergraduates. No pre-requisites. 4 cr.
B1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs./Fri. 9:30 am-12:30 pm
Alejandro Botta
Note: Non-standard course dates of June 29-July 17

First-Semester French
CAS LF 111

A multimedia approach for students who have never studied French. A variety of communicative tasks develop speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. 4 cr.
B1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 9-11:30 am
Lillie Webb

Second-Semester French
CAS LF 112

Prereq: (CAS LF 111) or placement test results. Continues CAS LF 111. A multimedia approach which develops speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills, together with the grammar and vocabulary needed for more complex communicative tasks. 4 cr.
B1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 9-11:30 am
Monique Roy

Third-Semester French
CAS LF 211

Prereq: (CAS LF 112) or placement test results. Authentic literary selections by writers from diverse Francophone countries, cultural readings, and discussion of short-subject films by francophone filmmakers, accompanied by advanced study of grammar and emphasis on communicative skills. 4 cr.
B1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 11 am-1 pm
Liliane Dusewoir

Fourth-Semester French
CAS LF 212

Prereq: (CAS LF 211) or placement test results. Refines the four skills through in-depth study of a modern novel. Creative oral and written exercises based on the novel and study of advanced grammar. Viewing of contemporary French films. Fulfills CAS language requirement, prepares for further study (LF 303). 4 cr.
B1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 11 am-1 pm
Paula Hennessey

Second-Semester German
CAS LG 112

Prereq: (CAS LG 111) or placement test results. Continues study and practice of the basic skills of speaking, writing, and reading German. Conversational dialogues, reading of short texts, grammar sessions, compositions. Conducted in German. 4 cr.
B1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 9-11:30 am
Beate Alhadeff

Middle Egyptian I (Egyptian Hieroglyphs)
STH TO 846

An introduction to the culture of ancient Egypt and to the classical stage of the Egyptian script and language spoken in Ancient Egypt during the Middle Kingdom that remained the standard hieroglyph language down to the Graeco-Roman period. No prerequisites. Undergraduate students are welcome to register. The course also requires approximately six additional hours of class at the Museum of Fine Arts where students read/study pieces of the MFA Egyptian Collection. 4 cr.
B1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 4-6 pm
Alejandro Botta
Note: Non-standard course dates of June 29-July 30

Islam in Middle East Politics
CAS IR 509

Analysis of Islam in the classical and popular forms; examination of the role of the Muslim religion in the international politics of the modern Middle East, especially Iran, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, and Libya; their interrelationships and their attitudes toward the West. 4 cr.
B1 Tues./Wed./Thurs. 9:30 am-12 noon
Wilfrid Rollman

Beginning Latin 2
CAS CL 112

Prereq: (CAS CL 111) or equivalent. Further study of Latin grammar, forms, and vocabulary. 4 cr.
B1 Mon./Tues./Thurs./Fri. 1:30-3:30 pm
Peter Blandino

Intermediate Latin 2: Poetry
CAS CL 212

Prereq: (CAS CL 211) or equivalent. Reading of selections from Latin poetry. Authors read may include Catullus, Ovid, and Vergil. 4 cr.
B1 Mon./Tues./Thurs. 1-3:30 pm
Elizabeth Baxter

Reformations: Religion and Society in Early Modern Europe
STH TH 526/TH 826

Explores the interplay of religious, social, political, and cultural change in sixteenth century Europe amid the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, setting the origins of modern Europe in the context of the late Middle Ages and Renaissance. Topics include theological and ecclesiastical transformation, religion and state formation, social unrest, popular piety, marriage and gender, art and music, and the situation of religious minorities. 4 cr.
B1 Tues./Wed./Thurs. 1:30-4 pm
Christopher Brown