Summer Course Offerings at BU

Summer 2016

The Department of Religion does not offer graduate level courses during summer sessions.  However, students may be interested in taking courses offered in other relevant departments.  Please see the official Summer Term website for full course listings, details and availability. 

Session 1 (May 23-June 30)

Anthropology of Food
MET ML 641

What can food tell us about human culture and social organization? Food offers us many opportunities to explore the ways in which humans go about their daily lives from breaking bread at the family table to haggling over the price of meat at the market to worrying about having enough to eat. Food can also tell us about larger social organizations and global interconnections through products like Spam that are traded around the globe and the ways in which a fruit like the tomato transformed the culinary culture of European nations. In this course we consider how the anthropology of food has developed as a subfield of cultural anthropology. We also look at the various methodologies and theoretical frameworks used by anthropologists to study food and culture. 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Wed. 5:30-9 pm
Karen Metheny

Elementary Modern Arabic (Modern Arabic 1)
CAS LY 111

The essentials of standard Arabic, the idiom used in public communications throughout the Arab world. Listening, speaking, reading, writing. 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 10:30 am-1 pm
Kheireddine Bekkai

Introduction to Akkadian Cuneiform 1
CAS AR 543

A basic introduction to Akkadian, the Semitic language that served as the lingua franca in the ancient Near East from ca. 2500-500 BCE. Akkadian was the language of the Enuma Elish, Gilgamesh Epic, and Code of Hammurabi. The course consists of learning the Akkadian grammar, deciphering the cuneiforms, and translating the original scripts. By the end of semester, students will be decoding the Code of Hammurabi in the original Akkadian script. No prerequisites. Course fulfills Archaeology undergraduate topical requirement. 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 1-3 pm
Sehee Kim

Biology of Neurodegenerative Diseases
CAS NE 525

Prereq: (CAS NE 102 or CAS BI 203) and (CAS NE 203 or CAS BI 325). An in-depth look at molecular mechanisms of neurodegenerative diseases and their impact and relevance in clinical diagnosis and treatment. Topics include the molecular pathways of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and Creutzfeldt-Jacob Disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. 4 cr. Meets w/BI525
A1 (LEC) Tues./Wed./Thurs. 10 am-12:30 pm
(DIS) Tues./Thurs. 1:30-2:30 pm
Lucia Pastorino

Church and Society in the Western Middle Ages
STH TH 825

Social, personal, institutional, and theological aspects of Christianity in the West from the ninth century to the fifteenth. Topics include monasticism, the papacy, crusades, sacramental life, women’s religious life, scholasticism and the universities, mysticism, marriage, mendicancy and preaching, and heresy. 4 cr.
A1 Tues./Wed./Thurs. 9-11:30 am
Christopher Brown

Critical Studies in Literature and Gender
GRS EN 676

Topic for Summer 2016: Theories of Gender and Sexuality. Introduces major movements and texts in gender and sexuality studies central to literary studies. Sub-topics include identity, race, nationhood, family, erotics, representation and digital media, public/private spheres, and literary forms. Readings include theoretical works (feminist, queer, transgender, etc.), novels, graphic novels, and films. 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Wed. 2-5:30 pm
Erin Murphy

First-Semester French
CAS LF 111

A multimedia approach for students who have never studied French. A variety of communicative tasks develop speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 9-11:30 am
Nicholas Huckle

Second-Semester French
CAS LF 112

Prereq: (CAS LF 111) or placement test results. Continues CAS LF 111. A multimedia approach which develops speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills, together with the grammar and vocabulary needed for more complex communicative tasks. 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 9-11:30 am
Kirby Chazal

Third-Semester French
CAS LF 211

Prereq: (CAS LF 112) or placement test results. Authentic literary selections by writers from diverse Francophone countries, cultural readings, and discussion of short-subject films by francophone filmmakers, accompanied by advanced study of grammar and emphasis on communicative skills. 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 11 am-1 pm
Katherine Lakin-Schultz

Fourth-Semester French
CAS LF 212

Prereq: (CAS LF 211) or placement test results. Refines the four skills through in-depth study of a modern novel. Creative oral and written exercises based on the novel and study of advanced grammar. Viewing of contemporary French films. Fulfills CAS language requirement, prepares for further study (LF 303). 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 11 am-1 pm
Leslie Hawkes

First-Semester German
CAS LG 111

For beginners or according to placement examination results. Introduction to grammar, vocabulary, and structure of German, emphasizing the four basic skills: speaking, writing, listening, and reading. 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 9-11:30 am
Susanne Werk

Beginning Latin 1

CAS CL 111

Introduction to grammar, forms, and vocabulary of classical Latin. Beginners only. 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Tues./Thurs./Fri. 9-11 am
Colin Pang

Leading Spiritual Formation Ministries
STH TC 809

This course provides a context to explore preparing and leading forms of spiritual formation ministries in diverse settings. It is grounded in the assumptions that (1) all aspects of life provide opportunities for strengthening our spiritual journey, and (2) a key task of the spiritual leader is to facilitate experiences that can help people make those connections. The course offers guidance and practice in designing and leading such experiences, including retreats, small groups, and spiritual guidance. Foundations for spiritual formation ministries for children, youth, and families are also considered. Participants explore and reflect upon a variety of disciplines that ground and inform such leadership. A key task of the course is providing an opportunity for participants to identify and critically reflect upon their own theological and pedagogical perspectives and how those influence their practice of ministry. 4 cr.
A1 Tues./Wed./Thurs. 10 am-5 pm
Wanda Stahl
Note: Non-standard course dates. Meets Tu/Th and Wed 6/15.

The Middle East Today
CAS IR 511

A critical survey of the rise and development of modern nations, states, and economies in the Middle East and North Africa since 1900 that provides context and perspective essential for understanding contemporary issues (e.g., peace process, gender relations, religion’s roles, democracy). 4 cr.
A1 Tues./Thurs. 1-4:30 pm
Gregory Aftandilian

Special Topics in Sociology
MET SO 501

Topic for Summer 2015: A Social History of Boston’s North End. A socio-cultural history of Boston’s North End that examines changes in the area from the first Puritan settlement to the current period of gentrification, with central attention given to the dynamics of culture change among the Italian immigrants. Covers the impact of global changes on local processes, changes in American notions of identity and inclusion, and ethnic succession and competition; religious change, social organization, and Catholic festivals; William Foote Whyte’s “Street Corner Society”; the image of Italians as criminals, and myths and realities of “the Mafia”; the impact of drugs and drug violence in the North End in the 70s and 80s; demographic change, tourism, food marketing, and gentrification. Course includes two visits to the North End, including dinner in a North End restaurant on the final night of the course. 4 cr.
A1 Mon./Wed. 6-9:30 pm
James Pasto

Spiritual Autobiographies
STH TC 529/TC 829

From Augustine to Teresa of Avila, Jarena Lee to Gandhi, spiritual autobiographies reveal diverse paths of religious seekers, the crises and epiphanies that became focal points of meaning, discernment, and revelation. In the course, we study a sampling of spiritual autobiographical writing across diverse historical, religious, and cultural contexts. Students also engage in the process of life writing and have the opportunity to participate in a writing group to share and reflect upon their writing. Students have the option to explore practical uses of spiritual autobiography in pastoral ministry, spiritual direction, retreat facilitation, and work with specific ages and communities. 4 cr.  Meets w/TC829
A1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs./Fri. 10 am-5 pm
Claire Wolfteich
Note: Non-standard course dates of May 16-May 25. No class May 17.

 

Session 2 (July 5 – August 11)

Elementary Modern Arabic (Modern Arabic 2)
CAS LY 112

Prereq: (CAS LY 111). The essentials of standard Arabic, the idiom used in public communications throughout the Arab world. Listening, speaking, reading, writing. 4 cr.
B1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 10:30 am-1 pm
Haidy Wasef

Introduction to Akkadian Cuneiform II
CAS AR 544

Prereq: (CAS AR 543). Completes coverage of the essentials of Akkadian grammar and highlights differences between Assyrian and Babylonian dialects. Readings in cuneiform include sections of the Code of Hammurabi and the Epic of Gilgamesh. Course fulfills Archaeology undergraduate topical requirement. 4 cr.
B1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 1-3 pm
Sehee Kim

Biblical Interpretation from Hispanic and Latin American Perspectives
STH TO 838

Provides an introduction to the contexts, assumptions, and methods of Hispanic and Latin American Biblical exegeses and their contributions to Biblical and Religious Studies. Course objectives are: 1) to develop an awareness of the Hispanic and Latin American approaches to the Bible, their differences, and points of contact; 2) to understand the different assumptions of the Hispanic and Latin American interpretations of the Bible; 3) to develop intercultural exegetical skills and cross-cultural sensitivity; and 4) to experience and develop an understanding of the reality of US Hispanics and Latin Americans through learning about their history, economy, and political, social, and religious experiences. Selected passages from the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament are analyzed in terms of the cultural and historical situations of Latin Americans and Hispanic peoples in the United States. Open to undergraduates. No pre-requisites. 4 cr.
B1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs./Fri. 9:30 am-12:30 pm
Alejandro Botta
Note: Non-standard course dates of June 29-July 17

Culture and Cuisine: New England
MET ML 638

How are the foodways of New England’s inhabitants, past and present, intertwined with the history and culture of this region? In this course, students have the opportunity to examine the cultural uses and meanings of foods and foodways in New England using historical, archaeological, oral, and material evidence. We focus on key cultural, religious, and political movements that have affected foodways in the region, as well as the movement of people. 4 cr.

B1 Tues./Thurs. 5:30-9 pm
Netta Davis

Ancient Egyptian Magic and Religion
STH TO 844

A survey of the religion and magical practices of ancient Egyptians from the time of the pyramids through the Greco-Roman period (ca. 2600 BCE — 400 CE). The course offers an insight into the ancient Egyptian gods, religious thought, and ideas through the analysis of texts, iconography, and objects used in religious/magical practices. A special focus is on the role of popular magic and religion in everyday life and in the temple. The course also requires approximately six additional hours of class at the Museum of Fine Arts where students read/study pieces of the MFA Egyptian Collection. No prerequisites. Undergraduate students are welcome to register. 4 cr.
B1 (IND) Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 3-5 pm
Alejandro Botta
Note: Non-standard course dates of July 12- August 11.

Middle Egyptian I (Egyptian Hieroglyphs)
STH TO 846

An introduction to the culture of ancient Egypt and to the classical stage of the Egyptian script and language spoken in Ancient Egypt during the Middle Kingdom that remained the standard hieroglyph language down to the Graeco-Roman period. No prerequisites. Undergraduate students are welcome to register. The course also requires approximately six additional hours of class at the Museum of Fine Arts where students read/study pieces of the MFA Egyptian Collection. 4 cr.
B1 (IND) Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 10 am-12 noon
Alejandro Botta
Note: Non-standard course dates of July 12- August 11.

First-Semester French
CAS LF 111

A multimedia approach for students who have never studied French. A variety of communicative tasks develop speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. 4 cr.
B1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 9-11:30 am
Jenai Engelhard Humphreys

Second-Semester French
CAS LF 112

Prereq: (CAS LF 111) or placement test results. Continues CAS LF 111. A multimedia approach which develops speaking, reading, writing, and listening skills, together with the grammar and vocabulary needed for more complex communicative tasks. 4 cr.
B1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 9-11:30 am
Divisha Chummun

Third-Semester French
CAS LF 211

Prereq: (CAS LF 112) or placement test results. Authentic literary selections by writers from diverse Francophone countries, cultural readings, and discussion of short-subject films by francophone filmmakers, accompanied by advanced study of grammar and emphasis on communicative skills. 4 cr.
B1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 11 am-1 pm
Liliane Dusewoir

Fourth-Semester French
CAS LF 212

Prereq: (CAS LF 211) or placement test results. Refines the four skills through in-depth study of a modern novel. Creative oral and written exercises based on the novel and study of advanced grammar. Viewing of contemporary French films. Fulfills CAS language requirement, prepares for further study (LF 303). 4 cr.
B1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 11 am-1 pm
Paula Hennessey

Second-Semester German
CAS LG 112

Prereq: (CAS LG 111) or placement test results. Continues study and practice of the basic skills of speaking, writing, and reading German. Conversational dialogues, reading of short texts, grammar sessions, compositions. Conducted in German. 4 cr.
B1 Mon./Tues./Wed./Thurs. 9-11:30 am
Christiane Kaden

Islam in Middle East Politics
CAS IR 509

Analysis of Islam in the classical and popular forms; examination of the role of the Muslim religion in the international politics of the modern Middle East, especially Iran, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Yemen, Lebanon, Syria, Iraq, and Libya; their interrelationships and their attitudes toward the West. 4 cr.
B1 Tues./Wed./Thurs. 9:30 am-12 noon
Wilfrid Rollman

Beginning Latin 2
CAS CL 112

Prereq: (CAS CL 111) or equivalent. Further study of Latin grammar, forms, and vocabulary. 4 cr.
B1 Mon./Tues./Thurs./Fri. 1:30-3:30 pm
Rachel Fisher

Psychodynamics of Marriage and Family
STH TY 826

An introductory course that includes a comprehensive overview of the field of family systems and family therapy. Serves as an introduction to the theory and techniques of couples and family therapy. An attempt is made to integrate theory and practice through assignments, class activities, and personal and professional self-reflection. Students have the opportunity to reflect upon how they might actually use course content professionally in their respective disciplines. 4 cr. Meets w/TY926 and SED CE840.
B1 Mon./Wed. 4-7:30 pm
Steven Sandage

Spirituality and Social Work Practice
SSW HB 744

Grad Prereq: (SSW HB 720) or permission of department chair. Acquaints the student with current theories regarding religion and spirituality and their role in clinical work. Particular attention is given to the function of spirituality and religion in bridging internal and external adaptations throughout the life cycle. Utilizing psychodynamic and narrative frameworks, addresses ways of assessing and working with an individual’s spiritual and existential belief systems and attending to the ways in which spiritual beliefs and practices provide a window into a client’s inner world. In addition, addresses issues of transference and countertransference as they arise in the exploration of religious and spiritual material in psychotherapy. Draws heavily on case material, film, and fiction. 3 cr.
B1 Thurs. 3:30-8:30 pm
Michelle Walsh
Permission Required