Interfacial Fluid Dynamics Laboratory

 
  The Interfacial Fluid Dynamics Laboratory investigates a variety of phenomena that are dominated by interfacial forces, such as surface tension.  These projects range from measuring the drainage and rupture of bubbles to modeling how oil flows through porous rock.  Because these phenomena are often counter-intuitive, the group’s approach is to combine carefully controlled bench-top experiments with theoretical modeling.  Experimental techniques include interferometry, microfluidics, and high-speed photography.  The new physical insights gained from these projects can be applied to problems in manufacturing (e.g. controlling the degassing of bubbles in molten glass),  energy (e.g. determining how best to extract oil from porous reservoirs), and the environment (e.g. reducing uncertainty in climate models by better characterizing marine aerosol production).