Pamela Templer

Associate Professor of Biology

Expertise:
, , ,
Education:

PhD, Cornell University, 2001

Contact Info:

Return to Homepage…

I am broadly interested in ecosystem ecology and the influence that plant-microbial interactions have on nutrient cycling, retention and loss. I am particularly interested in the effects that human activities, such as fossil fuel combustion, introduction of non-native plant species, land use change and climate change, have on forest ecosystems. We currently examine a variety… Read more

I am broadly interested in ecosystem ecology and the influence that plant-microbial interactions have on nutrient cycling, retention and loss. I am particularly interested in the effects that human activities, such as fossil fuel combustion, introduction of non-native plant species, land use change and climate change, have on forest ecosystems. We currently examine a variety of nitrogen sources, including rain, fog, and anthropogenic nitrogen deposition. We explore how plant-microbial interactions influence nitrogen and carbon retention and loss within natural and managed ecosystems.

We currently work in temperate forests of the northeastern United States, redwood forests of California, and tropical forests of Puerto Rico and Mexico. We focus on three research themes: (1) the effects of winter climate change on forest biogeochemistry and carbon exchange; (2) controls on nitrogen retention and loss in temperate and tropical forest ecosystems, and (3) effects of land-use change and forest regeneration on nutrient cycling.

In the Media

View All
  • Eye on weather: The spring forecast

    March 30, 2014

    WBZ Richard Primack, College of Arts & Sciences Pamela Templer, College of Arts & Sciences From the April Fool’s Blizzard of 1997 to the record floods of May 2006 to the sizzling heat of the 2012 Boston Marathon, we are vulnerable to a veritable potpourri of weather in the spring… View video of experts Richard […]

  • Less Snowfall may Harm Soil Quality and Tree Health, Study Suggests

    February 28, 2014

    Nature World News Pamela Templer, College of Arts & Sciences Tree growth and water system quality may be negatively impacted by milder winters in the coming years, according to a new study. Researchers from Boston University report that less snow cover associated with warmer winters will leave the ground exposed to prolonged freezing conditions, which will have consequences […]

  • Milder winters can have negative impact on trees & water quality

    February 28, 2014

    WBUR “Morning Edition” Pamela Templer, College of Arts & Sciences Listen to audio of expert Pamela Templer

  • More than snow in the equation as school cancellations mount

    February 14, 2014

    Boston Globe (subscription required) Pamela Templer, College of Arts & Sciences The accusation: When it comes to snow, the region’s residents have melted into wimps. The alleged proof: The threshold for calling snow days seems to have dropped so low that officials cancel school for storms that would have been shrugged off in the past — […]

  • Wired Forest May Reveal How New England Forests Respond to Climate Change

    July 2, 2013

    Scientific American Pamela Templer, College of Arts & Sciences Monitoring a forest in New Hampshire provides clues to how important trees, such as maples, respond to changed conditions due to global warming… Expert quote: “It’s somewhat counterintuitive, but snow actually acts like a blanket. And so if you have a sufficient snowpack on the ground, […]

  • Losing Winter: Climate Change Will Hit New England Hard

    June 18, 2013

    Car Talk Pamela Templer, College of Arts & Sciences Have you noticed that maple syrup is getting more expensive and harder to find? There’s a reason for that, and we’ll get to it in a moment… Expert quote: “The climate is definitely changing around New England, where it’s warmed 2.5 degrees Fahrenheit since the 1950s. […]

  • Researchers Say New England Winters Getting Shorter

    November 22, 2012

    WBZ Pamela Templer, College of Arts & Sciences When you think of a New England winter, one thing comes to mind: snow. But research is showing our winters are changing… View article & video

  • Help, the mountains are melting!

    November 7, 2012

    The Phoenix Pamela Templer, College of Arts & Sciences Climate change may have been ignored during this fall’s elections, but it’s likely on the minds of many skiers — not to mention ski resorts eager to avoid a repeat of last year’s warm winter, which saw many ski-related businesses either opening late or closing early… […]

  • A climate change call to arms

    October 17, 2012

    Boston Globe (subscription required) Co-written by Pamela Templer, College of Arts & Sciences The official start of winter may still be more than two months away, but in New England, we should be watching the long-term forecasts… View article

View All Stories