January | February | March | April| May | June | July | August | September | October | November | December

February

Thursday, February 14 – Friday, February 15 | Financial Stability and Energy Security in the Americas and Europe: The Role of Transnational Policy Networks

This two-day international workshop was organised within the research project GR:EEN (Global Reordering: Evolution through European Networks) on February 14-15, 2013 with the aim of studying relations between the EU and regional Transnational Policy Networks (TPNs) in the Americas. TPNs are emerging as important elements of trans-state policymaking in the 21st century. In recent years, the ability of NGOs, transnational governance bodies and firms to shape world politics has steadily grown and an inquiry into their workings adds an informal, nongovernmental dimension to the debates on the interactions between the EU and other regions in the world.

The conference brought together policy makers and academics mainly working in the fields of energy security and financial stability. These two areas were chosen not only because they are key themes of the GR:EEN research project but also because they provide two salient and relevant lenses through which to understand the nature, dynamics and influence of TPNs.

Supported by Boston University’s Center for Finance, Law, and Policy and the European Commission’s Framework 7 Global Re-ordering: Evolution through European Networks (GR:EEN).

[Schedule and list of participants] [Blog post]

Thursday, February 21| Changing Welfare States: A luncheon discussion with Anton Hemerijck

Time: 12:30 – 2 PM
Location: Department of International Relations, 154 Bay State Road, 2nd floor

022113HEMERIJCKAnton Hemerijck is Dean, Faculty of the Social Sciences, VU University Amsterdam, and former director of the Netherlands Council for Government Policy (WRR). Anton joined us for a discussion his new book, Changing Welfare States, in which he offers a comprehensive assessment of welfare state performance and considers the future of the European welfare state in the wake of the financial crisis.

[Blog post]

Thursday, February 28 | Irish Voices: A Reading and Conversation with Colm Tóibín

Time: 6 – 7:30 PM
Location: Photonics Center, 8 St. Mary’s Street

022813TOIBINColm Tóibín, celebrated Irish novelist, essayist, playwright, journalist, critic, and, most recently, poet, was born in Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford in 1955. His published works include The Testament of Mary, The Master(a novel based on the life of Henry James) and Brooklyn, and the story collections Mothers and Sons and The Empty Family. He has been a visiting writer at Stanford, the University of Texas at Austin, and Princeton, and is now the Irene and Sidney B. Silverman Professor of the Humanities at Columbia.

The conversation was moderated by Christopher Ricks, William M. and Sara B. Warren Professor of the Humanities at Boston University and former professor of English at Bristol and at Cambridge Universities.

This event took place as part of our “European Voices” series – an ongoing series of conversations with artists and writers, activists and intellectuals exploring questions at the intersection of politics and culture. Co-sponsored by the Institute for the Study of Irish Culture at Boston University, the Center for the Humanities at Boston University, the literary journal AGNI, and BU’s Creative Writing Program. Funded in part by the European Commission Delegation in Washington DC.

[Blog post] [View on BUniverse]

Thursday, February 28 – Friday, March 1 | Voice and Voicelessness in Medieval Europe and Beyond: An interdisciplinary conference in medieval studies

022813VOICEThis two-day international conference brought together scholars in literature, theology, law, art history, history, and musicology, to examine the practices and values attached to the human voice in medieval cultures. The topic of voice and voicelessness engages with issues of law and representation; theology and embodiment; historicist models of subjectivity; the poetics and esthetics of marginality; and the linguistic dynamics of intercultural encounter. The conference sought a common ground for interdisciplinary dialogue by examining how distinct areas of scholarly endeavor approach a problem of universal resonance but elusive definition. [Complete program]

Sponsored by the Boston University Center for the Humanities; the Center for the Study of Europe; the departments of English, History, and Romance Studies; the Italian Interdisciplinary Fund; and by the Institut universitaire de France.

March

Friday, March 1 | Divine Songs: A special concert performance by Blue Heron

Time: 8 PM
Location: The Castle, 225 Bay State Road

030113BLUEHERONBlue Heron is a professional vocal ensemble that combines a commitment to vivid live performance with the study of original source materials and historical performance practice. Blue Heron’s principal repertoire interests are fifteenth-century English and Franco-Flemish polyphony, ranging from Dunstable and Du Fay through Ockeghem to Josquin; Spanish music between about 1500 and 1575; and neglected early sixteenth-century English music, especially the rich and unexplored repertory of the Peterhouse partbooks (c. 1540). Concert took place in conjunction with “Voice and Voicelessness in Medieval Europe,” directed by Professor Irit Kleiman of the Department of Romance Languages.

Tuesday, March 5 | The EU Inside Out: A Panel Discussion with  João Vale de Almeida, EU Ambassador to the US, and Michael Collins, Irish Ambassador to the US

Time: 12:30 – 2:30 PM
Location: Boston University Castle, 225 Bay State Road

030513EUINSIDEOUTThe forum addressed, broadly, the theme of democratic politics under conditions of globalization from an “inside” point of view.  Centering the conversations around global challenges, which by their nature do not yield to nation state solutions (whether economic crisis, transnational terrorism, or global warming), highlights the value of the European Union as  a model for transnational cooperation, regional integration, and cultural coexistence. Questions to be pursued include what the EU is becoming, how its policies and institutions are evolving, how its role as international actor is enhanced (or not) in response to new global challenges, and why, under conditions of globalization, its relationship with the United States remains more important than ever.

Moderated by Alan Berger, Retired editorial writer for international affairs, Boston Globe.

The “EU Inside Out: Conversations with European Ambassadors” series is funded by the European Commission Delegation in Washington DC. Co-sponsored by Center for Finance, Law and Policy at Boston University.

[Blog post] [View on BUniverse]

Tuesday, March 19 | The EU Inside Out: A Panel Discussion with Žygimantas Pavilionis, Ambassador of Lithuania to the US, and Olexander Motsyk, Ambassador of Ukraine to the US

Time: 5 – 6:30 PM
Location: Barrister’s Hall, Boston University Law School, 765 Commonwealth Avenue

030513EUINSIDEOUTThe forum addressed, broadly, the theme of democratic politics under conditions of globalization from both EU member state and non-member state perspectives. Centering the conversations around global challenges, which by their nature do not yield to nation state solutions (whether economic crisis, transnational terrorism, or global warming), highlights the value of the European Union as a model for transnational cooperation, regional integration, and cultural coexistence. Questions to be pursued include what the EU is becoming, how its policies and institutions are evolving, how its role as international actor is enhanced (or not) in response to new global challenges, and why, under conditions of globalization, its relationship with the United States remains more important than ever.

Moderated by Alan Berger, Retired editorial writer for international affairs, Boston Globe.

The “EU-Inside Out: Conversations with European Ambassadors” series is funded by a grant from the European Commission Delegation in Washington DC. Co-sponsored by Center for Finance, Law and Policy at Boston University and Europeans In Boston.

[Blog post] [View on BUniverse]

Wednesday, March 27 | Happiness at Work with “Chief Happiness Officer” Alexander Kjerulf

Time: 6 – 8 PM
Location: Trustees Ballroom, 1 Silber Way, 9th floor

032713KJERULFAlexander Kjerulf has introduced hundreds of thousands of people to the Danish word “abejdsglaede,” which translates “happiness at work,” through his popular blog, The Chief Happiness Officer, his book, Happy Hour is 9 to 5: How to Love Your Job, Love Your Life and Kick Butt at Work, and his popular TED talk. He makes the case that happy people are more successful than unhappy people and that happy businesses are more efficient than unhappy ones. His research draws on numerous real life examples of companies that have achieved success through happiness. Alex presents workshops on happiness at work at businesses and conferences all over the world. His clients include companies like Hilton, Microsoft, LEGO, IKEA, Shell, HP and IBM. [Video of Alex at TEDxCopeanhagen]

The event will be moderated by Tim Sullivan, editorial director of Harvard Business Review Press. Tim’s book, The Org: The Underlying Logic of the Office, coauthored with Ray Fisman, was published in January.

This event takes place as part of our “European Voices” series – an ongoing series of conversations with artists and writers, activists and intellectuals exploring questions at the intersection of politics and culture. Funded by a grant from the European Commission Delegation in Washington DC.

[Blog post] [View on BUniverse]

Thursday, March 28 | The Economics of the Eurozone Crisis: A luncheon discussion with Stefan Collignon

Time: 12:30 – 2 PM
Location: Department of International Relations, 154 Bay State Road, 2nd floor

021913COLLIGNONStefan Collignon is professor of political economy at Sant’Anna School of Advanced Studies, Pisa, since October 2007, and International Chief Economist of the Centro Europa Ricerche (CER), Roma, since July 2007. He is the founder of Euro Asia Forum at Sant’Anna school of advanced studies. Previously, he was Centennial Professor of European Political Economy at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) from January 2001 to 2005. During 2005-2007 he was Visiting Professor at Harvard University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Government Department and an associate of the Minda de Gunzburg Centre for European Studies at Harvard. He is author of numerous books on Monetary Economics, and the political economy of regional integration.

[Blog post]

April

Monday, April 1 | Film Screening + Director Talk: SNOVI (“Dreams”)

Time: 6 – 7 PM
Location: Photonics Center, 8 St. Mary’s Street, Room 206

040113SNOVIBoston University’s Center for the Study of Europe presents 2011 Academy Award nominee and Rhode Island Film Festival’s Grand Prize Winner of Best Experimental Film. SNOVI is the 15-minute fictional account of a Bosnian composer, struggling to cope with the aftermath of the Serbian aggression in the 1990′s. His memories interweave in fragments, forming a mosaic of a painful past not yet understood or realized. The film’s unique structure and stunning cinematography explores the conscious and subconscious ways we confront trauma, blurring the line between imagination and memory, nightmares and dreams.

Filmed entirely in Sarajevo, SNOVI is the result of a cross-cultural collaboration. The production team includes a Cannes-winning cinematographer and internationally acclaimed actors. The film’s themes are reminiscent of Lars von Trier’s Zentropa (“Europa”), and Alan Resnais’ “Hiroshima Mon Amour.”

Screening will be followed by a conversation with director Reshad Kulenovic about the tensions and circumstances in the Balkans. [Official site]

[Blog post]

Monday, April 1 | European Studies “Meet & Greet”

Time: 7 – 9 PM
Location: Department of International Relations, 154 Bay State Road

Join us for drinks, hors d’ourvre and conversation. Open to graduate students, faculty, and researchers from Europe, pursuing European topics, or just eager to learn more about “European Studies” at BU.

Monday, April 8 | Irish Voices: An Celebration of Poetry and Music with Ciarán Carson

Time: 6 – 7:30 PM
Location: Boston University Photonics Center, 8 St. Mary’s Street, 9th floor

040813CARSONCiarán Carson was born in Belfast, Northern Ireland, in 1948, into an Irish-speaking family. He is the author of a number of collections of poetry, including The Irish for No (1987), winner of the Alice Hunt Bartlett Award; Belfast Confetti (1989); First Language: Poems (1994), winner of the T.S. Eliot Prize; Breaking News (2003), winner of the Forward Poetry Prize; For All We Know (2008); On the Night Watch (2010); and Until Before After (2010).

The poetry reading was interspersed with selections of traditional Irish music. Ciarán, who plays flute and whistle, was accompanied his wife Deirdre, an accomplished fiddler.

The event was moderated by Meg Tyler, Associate Professor of Humanities at Boston University.

This event took as part of our “European Voices” series – an ongoing series of conversations with artists and writers, activists and intellectuals exploring questions at the intersection of politics and culture. Co-sponsored by the Institute for the Study of Irish Culture at Boston University, the Center for the Humanities at Boston University, the literary journal AGNI, and BU’s Creative Writing Program. Funded in part by the European Commission Delegation in Washington DC.

[Blog post] [View on BUniverse]

Thursday, April 11 | Why Germany Will Not Run the EU: A luncheon discussion with Daniela Schwarzer

Time: 12:30 – 2 PM
Location: Department of International Relations, 154 Bay State Road, 2nd floor

1106SCHWARZERDaniela Schwarzer heads the research unit European Integration at the German Institute for International and Security Affairs, Stiftung Wissenschaft und Politik (SWP) in Berlin. She is the co-founding editor of www.eurozonewatch.eu (2006) and of the European Political Economy Review (2003). She is currently serving as Fritz Thyssen Fellow at the Weatherhead Center of International Affairs at Harvard University.

[Blog post]

Thursday, April 11 | Ideapod: Thought Leaders and Intellectuals Demonstrating the Power of Ideas on the Web

Time: 4 – 6 PM
Location: Department of International Relations, 154 Bay State Road, 2nd floor

580347_433185766775664_731865941_nA number of threats to global peace and security require inspiring ideas and new solutions Yet during a time of information explosion on the web, it can be difficult if not impossible to directly share creative ideas with the organizations and social movements that can put these ideas into action. How can thought leaders and intellectuals harness the power of the digital revolution and provide new directions moving forward with their ideas?

This presentation, by Ideapod co-founder Justin Brown, focussed on these issues and more, while providing an overview of a new approach to idea sharing on the web. Ideapod is tailored to the needs of thought leaders and intellectuals, helping them provide context for idea sharing.

Ideapod launches in July in partnership with many international organizations and education institutions, including UNESCO, UNDP, OECD, Boston University and the London School of Economics. For more information on Ideapod, please see http://ideapod.com and http://www.thepowerofideas.com. You can also visit Ideapod on Facebook and Twitter.

[Blog post]

Thursday, April 18 | Irish Voices: A Reading and Conversation with Paul Muldoon

Time: 6 – 7:30 PM
Location: Boston University Photonics Center, 8 St. Mary’s Street, Room 206

041813MULDOONPaul Muldoon was born in Portadown, County Armagh and raised near The Moy, in Northern Ireland. He is the youngest member of a group of Northern Irish poets—including Seamus Heaney, Michael Longley, and Derek Mahon—which gained prominence in the 1960s and 1970s. Muldoon’s poems have been collected into three books, Selected Poems 1968-1986 (1986), New Selected Poems: 1968-1994 (1996), and the hefty Poems 1968-1998 (2001). His book Moy Sand and Gravel (2002) won both the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry and the International Griffin Poetry Prize. In addition to poetry, Muldoon has written libretti, rock lyrics—for Warren Zevon, The Handsome Family, and his own band, Rackett—and many books for children.

The conversation was moderated by Dan Chiasson, poetry critic at The New Yorker and The New York Times Magazine. Chiasson teaches poetry writing at Wellesley College and is the author of three books of poems, including Natural History (Knopf, 2005) and Where’s the Moon, There’s the Moon (Knopf, 2010).

This event took place as part of our “European Voices” series – an ongoing series of conversations with artists and writers, activists and intellectuals exploring questions at the intersection of politics and culture. Co-sponsored by the Institute for the Study of Irish Culture at Boston University, the Center for the Humanities at Boston University, the literary journal AGNI, and BU’s Creative Writing Program. Funded in part by the European Commission Delegation in Washington DC.

[Blog post] [View on BUniverse]

Monday, April 22 | Film Screening: Alois Nebel

Time: 6 – 8 PM
Location: Photonics Center, 8 St. Mary’s Street, Room 206

042213ALOISNEBELAlois Nebel is a 2011 Czech animated drama film directed by Tomáš Luňák, based on the comic-book trilogy by Jaroslav Rudiš and Jaromír 99. The end of the eighties in the twentieth century. Alois Nebel works as a dis­patcher at the small railway station in Bílý Potok, a remote village on the Czech–Polish border. He’s a loner, who prefers old timetables to people, and he finds the loneliness of the station tranquil – except when the fog rolls in. Then he hallucinates, sees trains from the last hundred years pass through the station. They bring ghosts and shadows from the dark past of Central Eu­rope. Alois can’t get rid of these nightmares and eventually ends up in sanatorium.

In the sanatorium, he gets to know The Mute, a man carrying an old photograph who was arrested by the police after crossing the border. No one knows why he came to Bílý Potok or who he’s looking for, but it is his past that propels Alois on his journey … [Official site]

Alois Nebel is an international co-production between Negativ, Czech TV (Czech Republic), Tobogang (Slovakia) and Pallas Film (Germany). Pavel Strnad of Negativ is the main producer.

The film was introduced by Igor Lukes, Professor of International Relations and History and Honorary Consul of the Czech Republic in Boston.

[Blog post]

Wednesday, April 24 | Federalism by Exception: The Future of Economic Governance in the Euro-area: A luncheon discussion with Henrik Enderlein

Time: 12:00 – 1:30 PM
Location: Department of International Relations, 154 Bay State Road, 2nd floor

042413ENDERLEINHenrik Enderlein is Professor of Political Economy and Economics at the Hertie School of Governance. He obtained degrees in economics and political science from Sciences Po, Paris, and Columbia University, New York, and his PhD at the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies in Cologne, Germany. From 2001-2003, he worked as an economist in the Directorate International and European Relations of the European Central Bank in Frankfurt, before taking up a Junior Professorship in Economics at the Free University Berlin. In 2003, Henrik Enderlein was awarded the Max Planck Society’s Otto-Hahn Medal for outstanding achievements by young scientists.

[Blog post]

Thursday, April 25 | Irish Voices: Tim Pat Coogan and The Famine Plot: England’s Role in Ireland’s Greatest Tragedy

Time: 6 – 7:30 PM
Location: The Katzenberg Center, College of General Studies, 871 Commonwealth Avenue

Timothy “Tim” Patrick Coogan (born 22 April 1935), called “the unofficial voice of modern Irish history” by The Economist, is an Irish historical writer, broadcaster and newspaper columnist. He served as editor of The Irish Press newspaper from 1968 to 1987. Today, he is best known for his popular and sometimes controversial books on aspects of modern Irish history, including The IRA, Ireland Since the Rising, On the Blanket, and biographies of Michael Collins and Éamon de Valera.

In the famine years of 1845-52, Ireland lost a quarter of its population. “An estimated one million people died of hunger and disease, while another million immigrated to places like Boston, New York, and Liverpool. In The Famine Plot, Coogan argues that these two million did not suffer simply because of a natural disaster, but because of a policy of not-so-benign neglect by England, which then governed the island nation.” (Boston Globe)

Sponsored by the Institute for the Study of Irish Culture at Boston University and the Center for the Study of Europe

[Listen on WBUR]

May

Thursday, May 23 | Bulgarian Voices: Lecture, Live Performances, and Short Film Screening

Time: 7 P – 9 PM
Location: Boston University Photonics Center, 8 St. Mary’s Street, Room 203

052313BULGARIAJournalist Eleonora Gadjeva, the Workshop for Civic Initiatives Foundation and the Bulgarian American Cultural Center Madara greeted us with stories from the living memory of Bulgarian crafts and traditions. Her new book is a collection of 25 stories, showcasing the diversity of Bulgarian tradition, the authentic colors of love for the past and its roots. At the event, which was dedicated to the Days of Bulgarian Education, Culture, and Slavonic Literature, the Workshop for Civic Initiatives Foundation presented its Storytellers project and its Living Heritage project through a photo gallery, and a 30-minute movie, while highlighting the ongoing work of the foundation. Guests were treated to live performances by the Bulgarian women’s singing group Omaia, accompanied by Zornitsa (Boston-based Balkan men’s vocal ensemble) and directed by the Taniana Sarbinska, and by the Bulgarian folklore singer Elena Mancheva.

The event took place as part of the Bulgarian Folk Festival in the US (May-June, 2013) in support of the Bulgarian foundation “I can too”, supporting children with special needs in Bulgaria. The Workshop for Civic Initiatives Foundation (WCIF) is a non-profit organization, registered in 2001 in accordance with the Law on Not-For-Profit Legal Entities. WCIF encourages different communities to take responsibility and work actively for social development efficiently, using local resources. [More info]