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February

Wednesday, February 22 | Luncheon Discussion: Ireland and the Euro

022212LAFFAN Brigid Laffan, Jean Monnet Professor of European Integration in the Department of Politics at University College Dublin, and visiting scholar at Harvard’s Center for European Studies, discussed the origins of the banking crisis in Ireland, after fifteen years of growth, and Ireland’s role in the unfolding Euro Crisis over a luncheon with faculty, graduate students, and visitors. She also compared Ireland’s situation with that of Greece, Italy, and Portugal.

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March

Monday, March 5 | Workshop: Actor Networks in International Political Economy

This exploratory workshop brought together scholars from both sides of the Atlantic to discuss actors and networks in the international political economy, with particular reference to the role of the state and learning and activism within policy networks.

9:00 – 10:15 THE STATE AS ACTOR AND NETWORK IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY Leonard Seabrooke, Professor of International Political Economy, University of Warwick, and Ole Jacob Sending, Senior Research Fellow, Norwegian Institute of International Affairs (NUPI) Professional Expertise in International Organizations
Daniel Mugge, Assistant Professor of International Relations and International Political Economy, University of Amsterdam Governing Reflexive Finance
Cornel Ban, Postdoctoral scholar in international studies; deputy director of Brown’s Development Studies Program Translating the IMF: Economists, Civil Society and the State in Transition Economies
Chair: Vivien A. Schmidt, Jean Monnet Professor of European Integration and Professor of International Relations and Political Science, Boston University

10:30 – 11:45 LEARNING AND ACTIVISM IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY

David Glick, Assistant Professor of Political Science, Boston University Corporate Learning on Compliance
Leonard Seabrooke, Professor of International Political Economy, University of Warwick Socialization and Policy Training in International Economic Organizations
Duncan Wigan, Assistant Professor, Copenhagen Business School Professional Activism and Policy Influence from Europe: The Case of the Tax Justice Network
Chair: Kevin Gallagher, Associate Professor of International Relations, Boston University

Supported by Boston University and the European Commission’s Framework 7 Global Re-ordering: Evolution through European Networks (GR:EEN). In cooperation with the Center for the Study of Asia and the Center for International Relations at Boston University.

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Monday, March 5 | International Conference: Liberty and Security in a Time of Global Re-ordering

12:45 – 1:00 OPENING REMARKS
Vivien A. Schmidt, Jean Monnet Professor of European Integration and Professor of International Relations and Political Science, Boston University

1:00 – 2:30 POWER RELATIONS AND GLOBAL CHALLENGES IN A TIME OF THE BRICS
Thomas Berger, Associate Professor of International Relations, Boston University
Frederik Ponjaert, Scientific Coordinator, Université Libre de Bruxelles
Tiewa Liu, Assistant Professor, Beijing Foreign Studies University
Marco Valigi, Lecturer in Strategic Studies, ISPI
Chair: William Grimes, Professor of International Relations and Political Science, Boston University

2:45 – 4:15 THE RISE OF THE BRICS: EMERGING ISSUES
Edward Cunningham, Assistant Professor, Geography and Environment, Boston University
Stephen Kingah, Research Fellow, United Nations University; Senior Associate Researcher, Institute for European Studies
Manjari Miller, Assistant Professor of International Relations, Boston University
Marcelo Saguier, Senior Researcher at the Latin American School of School of Social Sciences (FLACSO), Argentina
Chair: Joseph Fewsmith, Professor of International Relations and Political Science, Boston University

4:30 – 5:30 KEYNOTE ADDRESS Shaun Breslin, Professor of Politics and International Studies, University of Warwick

Tuesday, March 6 | Continued: International Conference: Liberty and Security in a Time of Global Re-ordering

9:00 – 10:30 EUROPE, THE US, AND THE MIDDLE EAST
Charles Dunbar, Lecturer in International Relations, Boston University
Irene Gendzier, Professor of Political Science, Boston University
A. Richard Norton, Professor of International Relations and Anthropology, Boston University
Chair: Houchang Chehabi, Professor of International Relations and History, Boston University

11:00 – 12:30 RELIGION, RADICALISATION AND COUNTER-TERRORISM

Ivan Arreguin-Toft, Assistant Professor of International Relations, Boston University
Robert Hefner, Professor of Anthropology, Boston University
Sulastri Osman, Associate Research Fellow, Centre of Excellence for National Security (CENS), S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies (RSIS)
Kumar Ramakrishna, Associate Professor and Head of the Centre of Excellence for National Security (CENS), S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies (RSIS)
Chair: A. Richard Norton, Professor of International Relations and Anthropology, Boston University

1:30 – 2:30 KEY NOTE ADDRESS
Andrew Bacevich, Professor of International Relations and History, Boston University

2.45 – 4:15 CULTURAL DISCOURSES OF HUMAN SECURITY
George Christou, Associate Lecturer in European Politics, University of Warwick
Neta Crawford, Professor of Political Science and African American Studies, Boston University
Oz Hassan, Senior Research Fellow, University of Warwick
Chair: Stuart Croft, Professor of International Security, University of Warwick

Supported by Boston University and GR:EEN, a European Commission Framework 7 program examining the current and future role of the EU in an emerging multipolar world. In cooperation with the Center for the Study of Asia and the Center for International Relations at Boston University.

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Wednesday, March 21 | Luncheon Discussion: Social Europe in Crisis: the Impact of the Eurozone Crisis on National Welfare States

Anton HemerijckAnton Hemerijck is the director of the Netherlands Council for Government Policy (WRR) and Professor in Comparative European Social Policy, Department of Public Administration at Erasmus University Rotterdam. His research focusses on comparative social issues, economic policy and institutional matters. Important publications include Recalibrating Social Europe (Oxford University Press, 2008) with Maurizio Ferrera.

032112FERRERAMaurizio Ferrera is Professor of Comparative Public Policy at the University of Milan and President of the Graduate School in Social, Economic and Political Sciences. He directs the Research Unit on European Governance (URGE) of the Collegio Carlo Alberto Foundation in Moncalieri (Turin). His interests include comparative public policies and European integration, with a special focus on the development, crisis and perspectives of the European welfare state.

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Monday, March 26 | Panel Discussion: The Eurozone Crisis: Is There a Way Out?

The panelists—top experts on different aspects of European economics, politics, and welfare states—focussed their remarks on the causes of the crisis and possible solutions, while also discussing its effects on EU institutions—such as the European Central Bank and the European Council—and on European countries—in particular Southern vs. Northern Europe.

Maurizio Ferrera
, University of Milan
Andrew Gamble, Cambridge University
Mark Thatcher, Dept of Government, London School of Economics
Sigurt Vitols, Wissenschaftzentrum Berlin für Sozialforschung
Chair: Vivien Schmidt, Boston University

The panel  culminated a two-day workshop, entitled Resilient Liberalism: European Political Economy Through Boom and Bust, examining the influence of economic liberalism on the European Union and its member states, and on political liberalism and democracy more generally. It brought together the contributors to a forthcoming Cambridge University Press publication on the state of the European political economy and the role of ideas in political economic change, co-edited by Vivien Schmidt and Mark Thatcher.

Co-sponsored by the Center for the Humanities at Boston University.

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Tuesday, March 27 | Poetry and Politics: Reading and Conversation with Don Paterson and Dan Chiasson

032712PATERSONDon Paterson was born in 1963 in Dundee, Scotland. He moved to London in 1984 to work as a jazz musician, and began writing poetry around the same time. His first collection, Nil Nil (1993) won the Forward Prize for best first collection. God’s Gift to Women (1997) won both the T.S. Eliot Prize and the Geoffrey Faber Memorial Prize, and Landing Light (2003) won the Whitbread Poetry Prize and an unprecedented second T.S. Eliot Prize. His most recent collection, Rain (2009), won the Forward Prize and the Queen’s Gold Medal for Poetry. He teaches poetry at the University of St. Andrews, and since 1996 has been poetry editor at Picador. He continues to perform and compose. The conversation was moderated by Dan Chiasson, poetry critic at The New Yorker and The New York Times Magazine. Chiasson teaches poetry writing at Wellesley College and is the author of three books of poems, including Natural History (Knopf, 2005) and Where’s the Moon, There’s the Moon (Knopf, 2010).

This event took place as part of an ongoing series of conversations with artists and writers exploring questions of language, culture, nation, history, and the role of the artist in society. Co-sponsored by the Center for the Humanities at Boston University, the Department of English, and the literary journal AGNI.

[Blog post] [View on BUniverse] [Listen on WBUR]

April

Thursday, April 5 | Lecture: How to Keep Muslims Out? The Enigma of Civilization in India, China, and Europe

040512VANDERVEERPeter van der Veer, Director of the Max Planck Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity at Göttingen, is author of Gods on Earth (LSE Monographs, 1988), Religious Nationalism (University of California Press, 1994), and Imperial Encounters (Princeton University Press, 2001). He has just finished a monograph on the comparative study of religion and nationalism in India and China. Sponsored by the Center for the Study of Asia at Boston University.

Thursday, April 12 | The Euro’s Crisis of Democracy: Luncheon Discussion with Miguel Maduro

041212MADUROLuís Miguel Poiares Pessoa Maduro is Visiting Professor of Law and Gruber Global Constitutionalism Fellow at Yale Law School and Professor and Director of the Global Governance Programme at European University Institute.  A specialist in European Union law, international economic law, constitutional law, and comparative institutional analysis, he served as Advocate General for the European Court of Justice in Luxembourg from 2003 to 2009. In his luncheon dissuasion on the Euro Crisis – which he defined as a political crisis – Maduro focussed on the “gap” between European policies and national politics. According to Maduro, “Europe’s democratic deficit is less a gap between European institutions and European citizens than between national politics and European problems.”

Thursday, April 12 | The Promises of Constitutional Pluralism: Lecture by Miguel Maduro

On Thursday afternoon, Miguel Maduro gave a lecture on “constitutional pluralism” in the context of the EU legal order and its relationship with national legal orders. Usually, according to Maduro, the phenomenon of a plurality of constitutional sources creates potential conflicts between different constitutional orders to be solved in a non-hierarchical manner, affecting the role of courts and the character of judicial adjudication. Maduro focused on how constitutional pluralism impacts different dimensions of judicial adjudication and interpretation by reference to a broader notion of pluralism. The lecture was introduced by Daniela Caruso, Professor of Law, and moderated by Hugh Baxter, Professor of Law and Philosophy.

Maduro’s visit to Boston University was organized by the Boston University School of Law in cooperation with the Center for the Study of Europe, Instituto Universitario de Estudios Europeos, Universidad San Pablo CEUThe Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency (EACEA) of the European Union, and the European Commission, DG Education and Culture, Lifelong Learning program.

[Blog post] [Listen on WBUR]

Tuesday, April 17 | France Today: What is France, where is it going, and where is its place in the world?

041712GUILHOUChristophe Guilhou, Consul General of France in Boston, while unable in his diplomatic capacity to discuss the French elections, gladly shared his insights into the core issues facing France today, including the economy, demographic changes within France, and finally, France’s role in the world. Introduced and moderated by William Keylor, Professor of International Relations and History.

Co-sponsored by BU Study Abroad.

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Thursday, April 19 | The System (Das System – Alles verstehen heißt alles verzeihen): Film Screening and Director Talk with Marc Bauder and Dörte Franke

051912BAUDER051912FRANKEWe were thrilled to be one of the first locations in North America, and the first in Boston, to screen The System (Germany, 2011, 85 minutes, in German with English subtitles), the latest project and first feature by renowned filmmakers Marc Bauder and Dörte FrankeThe System premiered at the 2011 Max Ophüls Prize Film Festival. It won the Cine Star award 2011 at the film festival in Schwerin and the DEFA advancement award at the film festival in Cottbus. Bauder and Franke introduced the film and led a discussion with audience following the screening.

In cooperation with the Department of Modern Languages and Comparative Literature and the Goethe Institut Boston.

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Monday, April 23, 2012  | The Debt Crisis in Europe and New Europe’s Two Decades of Catch Up: A Luncheon Discussion with Miroslav Singer

042312SINGERMiroslav Singer, Governor of the Czech National Bank, is a respected economic theoretician with a long list of publication credits. After graduating from the University of Economics in Prague (1991), he obtained a postgraduate fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh, where he completed his thesis and was awarded a PhD in 1995. Singer has served on the Czech National Bank’s Council since 1995, when he was appointed its vice-governor and, in 2010, Governor. His special areas of expertise cover economic transformation, growth, the European currency, bankruptcy legislation, and corporate governance.

Sponsored by the Center for International Relations in cooperation with the Center for Finance, Law and Policy.

May

Saturday, May 12, 2012  | Landscape of the Dispossessed: A Reading and Conversation with Herta Müller

Herta Muller_Isolde Ohlbaum_smHerta Müller is the 2009 winner of the Nobel Prize for Literature. She was born in 1953 in a German-speaking town in Banat, Romania, where her parents were members of the German-speaking minority. At university, Ms. Müller opposed the regime of Nicolae Ceausescu and joined Aktionsgruppe Banat, a group of dissident writers who sought freedom of speech. She emigrated to Germany in 1987 after years of persecution and censorship in Romania. Her early works depict village life and the repression its residents face. Her later novels, including The Land of Green Plums and The Appointment, approach allegory in their graphic portrayals of the brutality suffered by modest people living under totalitarianism.

Moderated by Askold Melnyczuk and William Pierce. Melnyczuk is founding editor of AGNI and the author of three novels, most recently The House of Widows. He has published stories, poems, translations, and reviews in The New York Times, The Nation, The Partisan Review, Grand Street, Ploughshares, Poetry, and The Boston Globe. Pierce’s fiction has appeared in Granta, Ecotone, and elsewhere. He is senior editor of AGNI, where he contributes a series of essays called “Crucibles.”

This event took place as part of an ongoing series of conversations with artists and writers exploring questions of language, culture, nation, history, and the role of the artist in society. In cooperation with the Goethe Institut Boston and the literary journal AGNI.

[Blog post] [View on BUniverse]

September

Tuesday, September 18 | The Politics of Precaution: Regulating Health, Safety, and Environmental Risks in Europe and the United States – A talk by David Vogel

0918VOGELDavid Vogel, Professor of Political Science and the Solomon P. Lee Chair in Business Ethics at the Haas School of Business, University of California, Berkeley, and one of the foremost experts on business-government relations and on corporate social responsibility, was at Boston University to discuss his new book on “The Politics of Precaution.” A popular speaker with scholarly, practitioner, and lay audiences alike, Professor Vogel focuses on the comparative and international dimensions of environmental and consumer regulation. Co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science.

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Thursday, September 27 | European Union in Crisis: The Hopes and Woes of Politics and Economics

Time: 5:30 PM to 7 PM
Location: College of Arts & Sciences | 725 Commonwealth Avenue, Room 211

0927EUROCRISISThe Boston University International Affairs Association and the Undergraduate Economics Association presented a panel discussion with European Studies faculty Cornel Ban (International Relations), Christophe Chamley (Economics), Jordi Jaumandreu (Economics, and Vivien Schmidt (International Relations and Political Science). Come learn about and discuss the economic and political situation in Europe with BU experts! Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Europe.

Thursday, September 27 | The Power of Civil Society: The Fate of Jews in Bulgaria – Gallery reception with opening talk by the President of Bulgaria, Rosen Plevneliev

0927PLEVNELIEVThe Rubin-Frankel Gallery at Boston University’s Hillel House was honored to host the President of Bulgaria, Rosen Plevneliev, in conjunction with The Power of Civil Society: the Fate of Jews in Bulgaria, a new exhibit of historical significance which tells the story of how Bulgaria was able to save its Jewish citizens during World War II and the Holocaust. The President’s remarks were followed by a a public reception and a performance by Bulgarian-Boston Dance Ensemble Ludo Mlado.

Sponsored by the Boston Honorary Consul General of Bulgaria and the Florence & Chafetz Hillel House at Boston University. Co-sponsored by the Center for the Study of Europe.

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Thursday, September 27 – Saturday, September 29 | Cinema, Opera, Art: The Passion of Werner Schroeter

0928SCHROETERThe Center for the Study of Europe at Boston University co-sponsored an international, interdisciplinary conference on the works of Werner Schroeter, organized by Roy Grundmann, Film Studies Program Director at Boston University, and hosted by the Goethe-Institut Boston. The symposium took place in conjunction with a retrospective of Werner Schroeter’s works at the Harvard Film Archive, September 21-October 1, and an exhibition of works by Alberte Barsacq, Schroeter’s costume and stage designer, at the Goethe-Institut Boston.

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October

Tuesday, October 9 | The Influence of the Internet on Integration and Multiculturalism in Germany: A German-Turkish Muslim Blogger’s Observations – A talk by Kübra Gümüsay

1009GÜMÜSAYKübra Gümüsay is an active member of the Muslim blogosphere and one of the few Muslim members of the German netpolitics community. Her talk will focus on the changes the Internet has brought to social life in Germany, especially in context of multiculturalism, diaspora communities, and minorities, with a specific focus on the Muslim diaspora. Feeling misrepresented in mainstream media, minorities of comparatively weak lobbies, such as Turks, Arabs, Blacks, Muslims and Roma, are increasingly using the Internet to create a space for alternative media. As they speak up, comment on politics, get involved in debates and push their agendas, they ultimately influence mainstream media. Gümüsay will highlight the groups’ struggles, portray this process and evaluate its outcome on the German Muslim identity and on society, and in the process try to provide some answers to these questions: Has the Internet brought us closer together? Or are we now – more than ever – living in parallel worlds?

Co-sponsored by the Center for International Relations and the Institute for the Study of Muslim Societies and Cultures at Boston University, the Goethe-Institut Boston, and the Goethe-Institut Washington.

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Wednesday, October 10 | Skills and Inequality: Partisan politics, economic coordination and the reform of education and training regimes in Western welfare states – A talk by Marius Busemeyer

1010BUSEMEYER_2Marius Busemeyer is a Professor of Political Science at the University of Konstanz. His research focuses on comparative political economy, welfare states, public spending, social democratic parties and theories of institutional change. In 2010, the University of Cologne granted him the “venia legendi” (Habilitation) in Political Science. In the same year, Busemeyer received a grant from the German National Science Foundation (DFG) (Emmy-Noether Program) to support the establishment of a junior research group on the topic of “The Politics of Education and Training Reform in Western Welfare States.”

Co-sponsored by the Department of Political Science.

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Wednesday, October 17 | The Future of the Euro as a Common Currency – A talk by Michael P. Dooley

DOOLEYThe Boston University Center for Finance, Law and Policy presented a talk by Michael P. Dooley, Research Associate, National Bureau of Economic Research; International Research Fellow, Kiel Institute of World Economics; and editor of the International Journal of Finance and Economics. Dooley joined the faculty at UCSC in 1992 following more than twenty years service at the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and the Research Department of the International Monetary Fund. His research covers a range of issues in open economy macroeconomics including Bretton Woods II, crises in emerging markets, debt management, capital controls, capital flight and liberalization of financial markets.

Co-sponsored by the Graduate Program in Banking and Financial Law, the Global Development Policy Program, and the Center for the Study of Europe.

Thursday, October 18 | The Urbanization of Anti-Capitalist Struggle – A lecture by David Harvey

Friday, October 19 | Open Seminar with David Harvey for Faculty and Graduate Students

1018HARVEYThe Center for the Study of Europe was honored to co-sponsor two events with renowned public intellectual David Harvey. Harvey is the world’s most cited academic geographer and the author of many books and essays influential in the development of modern geography as a discipline. His work has contributed to broad social and political debate, and he is credited with helping to resurrect social class and Marxist methods as serious methodological tools in the critique of global capitalism, particularly its neoliberal form. This event took place as part of the annual “Lectures in Criticism” at Boston University.

Co-sponsored by the Center for the Humanities, the Department of English, the Department of Romance Studies, the Department of Modern Languages and Comparative Literature, and the Center for the Study of Europe.

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Friday, October 19 | NATO’s European Allies and the Burden Sharing within the Alliance – A luncheon discussion with Janne Haaland Matlary and Magnus Petersson

Time: 12 PM to 1:30 PM
Location: Department of International Relations | 154 Bay State Road, 2nd floor

Friday, October 19 | NATO’s Future: New Research and Trends – An open seminar with Janne Haaland Matlary and Magnus Petersson

Time: 4 PM to 5:30 PM
Location: Department of International Relations | 154 Bay State Road, 1st floor

1019MATLARYJanne Haaland Matlary is Professor of International Politics, Department of Political Science, University of Oslo, and at the Norwegian Defence University College. She was Under Secretary of State 1997-2000, and she is an expert member of the Norwegian parliament’s commission tasked with proposing changes to the Norwegian Constitution. She is also a member of the Norwegian MFA’s Security Policy Commission, and she has published widely on European integration and transatlantic relations.

1019PETERSSONMagnus Petersson is Professor in Modern History at the Norwegian Institute for Defence Studies. In 1998/2008 he was Lecturer, Head of Research and Development and Director of Studies at the Swedish National Defence College, and during 2012-2013 he is a Visiting Scholar at the Department of International Relations, Boston University. He has published books and articles on Nordic security, defense transformation and transatlantic relations.

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November

Tuesday, November 13 | Can Greece and the Eurozone Live with Each Other? – A luncheon discussion with Kevin Featherstone

Time: 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM
Location: Department of International Relations | 154 Bay State Road, 2nd floor

1113FEATHERSTONE

Kevin Featherstone is Eleftherios Venizelos Professor of Contemporary Greek Studies and Director of the Hellenic Observatory in the European Institute at the London School of Economics. He was previously Professor of European Politics (1995-2002) and Jean Monnet Chair in European Integration Studies (1994-2002) at the University of Bradford. His research has focussed on the politics of the European Union and the politics of contemporary Greece; his work has been framed in the perspectives of comparative politics, public policy, political economy and processes of “Europeanization.”

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Wednesday, November 14 | Europe’s Crisis and the Pathologies of Democracy – A luncheon discussion with Kalypso Nicolaïdis

Time: 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM
Location: Boston University Castle | 225 Bay State Road

1114NICOLAÏDISKalypso Nicolaïdis is Director of the European Studies Centre and a Fellow at St Antony’s College where she teaches international relations, international political economy and European integration. In her research, she combines long-standing interests in exploring the dynamics of European integration, issues of identity, justice and cooperation in the international system, the sources of legitimacy in European and global governance, the relations between the EU and the Mediterranean/Turkey as well as preventive diplomacy and dispute resolution. Responses by Taylor Boas, Assistant Professor of Political Science and Vivien Schmidt, Director of the Center for the Study of Europe.

Discussion took place as part of International Education Week “Global Conversations” series. Co-sponsored by Latin American Studies.

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Wednesday, November 14 | Exploring EU 2020 with Vivien Schmidt

Time: 7 PM
Location: swissnex Boston, 420 Broadway, Cambridge

1114SCHMIDTBoston International and swissnex Boston hosted a discussion of the European crisis with Vivien Schmidt, Jean Monnet Professor of European Integration and Director of the Center for the Study of Europe. The talk centered around the following questions: Can intervention by the European Central Bank salvage the the Euro-zone? Will EU members agree on debt mutualization? Will they provide continuous support to bankrupt Greece or will they let it fail? How can citizens be reassured out of their growing disaffection?

Wednesday, November 15 | On the Edge of the Cold War: American Diplomats and Spies in Postwar Prague – A book presentation by Igor Lukes

Time: 4:45 PM
Location: Center for European Studies at Harvard University, Lower Level Conference Room | 27 Kirkland Street, Cambridge

1115LUKESWas the 1948 Communist takeover inevitable? Harvard College’s Czech and Slovak Society hosted a talk by Igor Lukes, Professor of International Relations and History at Boston University and Honorary Consul of the Czech Republic in Boston. Lukes explores the communist conquest of Czechoslovakia from the perspective of American diplomats and intelligence officers who served in the U.S. Embassy from thspring of 1945 to 1949.

Read a review of the Lukes’ book by the Wall Street Journal here.

December

Tuesday, December 4 | Holiday “Meet and Greet” for Graduate Students and Faculty

Time: 6 – 8 PM
Location: Department of International Relations | 154 Bay State Road, 2nd floor

Celebrate the holidays with European Studies faculty and graduate students. Join us for a “Weihnachtsmarkt”-themed evening featuring mulled wine, German beer, baked apples, hot chestnuts, gingerbread and more! All faculty and graduate students from Europe, pursuing European topics / themes in your research, or just interested in learning more about European Studies at BU are welcome!

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