Susan L. Mizruchi

Professor

BA, Washington University
MA, PhD, Princeton University


Room 314
617-358-2529
For CV click here

Susan L. Mizruchi is Professor of English Literature at Boston University.  She received B.A.’s in English and in History from Washington University in 1981 and her Ph.D. from Princeton University in 1985.  Professor Mizruchi’s specialties are nineteenth- and twentieth-century American literature; religion and culture; literary and social theory; literary history; and history of the social sciences.  She has taught courses in literature, gender, and film at Boston University for twenty-five years.  Publications include: The Rise of Multicultural America (North Carolina UP, 2008)  Becoming Multicultural: Culture, Economy, and the Novel, 1860–1920 (Cambridge UP 2005);  The Science of Sacrifice: American Literature and Modern Social Theory (Princeton UP, 1998); The Power of Historical Knowledge: Narrating the Past in Hawthorne, James, & Dreiser (Princeton, 1988); and, as editor Religion and Cultural Studies, editor (Princeton UP, 2001) and contributor to The Norton Critical Edition of The Souls of Black Folk (1999).  She is the recipient of many academic honors, including year-long fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation, the Huntington Library, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.  She is currently at work on three book-length projects: “Brando’s Smile: His Life, Thought, and Work” under contract with Norton; a study of the overlap between politics and culture in the 1950’s (Oxford Culture Series); and A Novel in Four Acts.

Selected Publications
  • “Risk Theory and the Contemporary American Novel,” American Literary History (2009)
  • The Rise of Multicultural America (North Carolina UP, 2008)
  • “Gibson’s Passion in Ethical Perspective,” Journal of Renmin University of China (2007)
  • Becoming Multicultural: Culture, Economy, and the Novel, 18601920 (Cambridge UP 2005)
  • Editor, Religion and Cultural Studies (Princeton UP, 2001)
  • The Science of Sacrifice: American Literature and Modern Social Theory (Princeton UP, 1998)
  • The Power of Historical Knowledge: Narrating the Past in Hawthorne, James, and Dreiser (Princeton UP, 1988)
  • “Lolita in History,” American Literature (2003)
  • “Becoming Multicultural,” American Literary History (2003)
  • “The Place of Ritual in Our Time,” American Literary History (2000)
  • “Neighbors, Strangers, Corpses: Death and Sympathy in the Early Writings of W. E. B. Du Bois,” Centuries’ Ends, Narrative Means (1996) and The Norton Critical Edition of The Souls of Black Folk (1999)
  • “Cataloging the Creatures of the Deep: Billy Budd and the Rise of Sociology,” Revisionary Interventions into the Americanist Canon (1994) and Boundary 2 (1990)
  • “Reproducing Women in The Awkward Age,” Representations (1992)
  • “The Politics of Temporality in The Bostonians,” Nineteenth-Century Literature (1985)
Work in Progress
  • Book project on Risk and Contemporary American Culture
  • Book Project on Sexuality and Celebrity in American Cinema
  • A Novel in Four Acts
Honors, Grants, and Awards
  • Boston University Humanities Foundation Senior Fellowship (2008–2009)
  • Guggenheim Fellowship (2001–2002)
  • Distinguished Teaching Award, Boston University Honors Program (2001)
  • Fletcher S. Jones Fellowship, Huntington Library (1995)
  • National Endowment for the Humanities Fellowship (1990–1991)
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