Introduction to Engineering: Spring 2017

All College of Engineering students must earn 2.0 credits of Introduction to Engineering. The Introduction to Engineering course is scheduled for completion in the freshman year and is intended to provide an introduction to engineering analysis and/or design.

ENG EK 131 and ENG EK 132 are 2.0 credit half-semester courses. ENG EK 131 meets during the first six weeks of the semester. ENG EK 132 meets during the second six weeks of the semester. You must complete either ENG EK 131 or ENG EK 132.

Course Dates

EK 131 begins on January 23 and ends on March 13

  • The last day to add an EK 131 module is Monday, January 30
  • The last day to drop EK 131, without a W, is TBA
  • The last day to drop EK 131, with a W, is TBA

EK 132 begins on March 20 and ends on May 3

  • The last day to add an EK 132 module is Monday, March 27
  • The last day to drop EK 132, without a W, is TBA
  • The last day to drop EK 131, with a W, is TBA

Course Offerings

Professor Frank-Kamenetskii
MW
10:10-11:55am
Enroll Limit: 20
Location: TBA

The module provides students with knowledge and understanding of undergoing revolutionary changes in medical practice due to the advent of DNA-based technologies of diagnostics, prognosis and treatment of various diseases. The fundamental concepts underlying the new developments are explained, such as: DNA and RNA chemical structure, DNA and RNA function in the cell, central dogma of molecular biology, DNA sequencing and the advent of the genome era, etc. Contemporary issues are covered, such as: new technologies of genome editing in vivo, repair of genome defects, cell engineering-based immunotherapy of cancer, the prospects of personalized medicine, etc. Special emphasis is given to serious ethical problems stemming from the advent of the DNA editing technologies. Students will be asked to prepare written essays arguing whether germ cells’ genome editing must be banned or be allowed. Students, whose essays proved to be best articulated, are asked to debate in front of the class with the all other students engaged. At the end of the class the straw poll on the issue will be conducted. (2.0 credits)

Professor Vaina
MW
10:10-11:55am
Enroll Limit: 20
Location: TBA

The focus of this course is on the localization in the human brain of visual, motor and language functions and of their deficits resulting from stroke, schizophrenia, autism, and epilepsy. This will be accomplished by using theories and examples from human neuroanatomy, neurophysiology, neurology cases and behavioral studies. The major emphasis of the class will be on structural and functional magnetic imaging as it applies to contemporary studies of human neuroanatomy, neurology, psychiatry and of normal behavior.We will briefly discuss the principles of MRI/fMRI, structural brain imaging in health and disease, bold physiology and haemodynamics, fMRi experiments and spatio-temporal characteristics. We will emphasize the ethical aspects of the research and clinical applications of functional neuroimaging and of other modern methods of functional brain mapping (MEG, presurgical planning), the difference between these methods and their specific advantages for various aspects of clinical practice. The course consists of lectures, class discussions, writing a scientific essay on applications of functional neuroimaging, and presentations of scientific articles on the use of fMRI for clinical applications. There will be a take home ethics exam. (2.0 credits)

Professor Kotiuga
MW
10:10-11:55am
Enroll Limit: 20
Location: TBA

The electric guitar evolves concurrently with the electrical reproduction of recorded music. This hands-on course uses the electric guitar as a gateway to musical acoustics and electro-acoustics. Before considering how electronics and amplifiers have become an integral “part of the instrument”, we review the basics of hearing, musical scales, resonance and the fundamentals of fretted string instruments. By examining the notions of distortion, compression, and feedback, an understanding is developed, of how the rock guitarist’s effects and multi-track recording are antithetical to the audiophile’s quest. This also provides a means of distinguishing “hi fi” from various notions of “good sound”. The course will be supported by field trips, demos and labs. (2.0 credits)

Professor Horenstein
MW
10:10-11:55am
Enroll Limit: 20
Location: TBA

Without electronics, a robot would be just a pile of mechanical parts. As a student in this module, you’ll build and bring a robot to life by learning the electronics and digital systems essential to motion, control, and decision making, with a focus on the electronics needed to give robots their intelligence. Topics to be studied include microcontroller programming, logic gates, transistors, electromechanical conversion, infrared sensors, control algorithms, and basic traction systems. The course is very hands on and involves soldering, assembling, bread-boarding, and debugging. You’ll build your own small surface robot from basic components, learn about how it works, then propose and complete a design project using your robot as a platform. The robot will be yours to keep at the end of the course. (2.0 credits)

Professor Grace
MW
10:10-11:55am
Enroll Limit: 30
Location: TBA

In this module students will design, build, and test gliders. Students will be introduced to the basics of aerodynamics and flight stability. Students will use computational tools to analyze their airfoil and wing designs in order to determine an optimal design. The flight test results will be compared to predictions. (2.0 credits)

Professor Gopalan
MW
10:10-11:55am
Enroll Limit: 20
Location: TBA

Energy is an essential part of modern society. The world depends on a constant and reliable supply of energy – for homes, businesses and transport, and the consequences of our energy use have measurable global effects. There are many ways we can produce energy, and many factors determine which methods and sources are appropriate for different applications. In this course we will discover how different clean energy technologies work, learn the physical principles and engineering challenges involved, explore the pros and cons of those different technologies, and design solutions to real world problems. Topics will include batteries, biofuels, biomass, combined heat and power, fuel cells, geothermal, landfill gas, photovoltaics, small hydroelectric, solar cooking, solar thermal, waste-to-energy, wave and tidal, wind and more. A hands-on laboratory project will include design, manufacture, and use of simple clean energy systems to power small loads. (2.0 credits)