Singh Equipment

Imagineering Competition

Winner's Circle

Before the Singh Imagineering Lab was launched in October, 2011, Dean Kenneth R. Lutchen envisioned the facility as a place where College of Engineering students could cultivate their entrepreneurial spirit and develop as Societal Engineers who apply their expertise to advance our quality of life. Since the Lab’s opening, more and more undergraduates have taken advantage of its tools and machinery to pursue their own ideas on how to do just that—including those who have vied for top prizes in the College’s annual Imagineering Competition.

Sponsored by John Maccarone (ENG’66), the competition was designed to reinforce the ideal of creating the Societal Engineer by spotlighting student efforts to design, build and test new technologies that promise to positively impact society. Imagineering Lab programming is supported by the Kern Family Foundation and alumni contributions to the ENG Annual Fund.

2014 Winners

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First Prize

Downtyme, an app that makes it easier for college students and other overscheduled people to get together offline, won the $2,500 first prize. Downtyme enables Facebook friends with free time to find each other by uploading their calendars, selecting one friend or group of friends who are free and close by during a specified window of time, and inviting them to share a meal, study, play basketball, hang out, and more. Incorporating more than 25,000 lines of code, the app displays friends on your screen in order of proximity and closeness of relationship to you. Team members include Timothy Chong (BME/CE’16), Luke Sorenson (CE/EE’16), John Moore (CE’16), Nick Sorenson (SMG’14) and Barron Roth (CE’16) (not in photo). Click here for more details.

 

Second Prize

The second prize winner, Konstantinos Oikonomopoulos (ME’14), received $1,500 for his project, “Hexapteron,” a robotic manipulator that can both translate and rotate objects about the x, y and z axes with three sets of software-controlled, carbon-fiber arms that move in parallel. It’s a next-generation, six-degrees-of-freedom manipulator with a unique design and properties that make it suitable for a wide range of applications, including affordable, desktop 3D printing on curved surfaces, multi-axis machining and multi-axis robotic assembly.

 

Third Prize

Adrian Tanner (ME’15) and Rhonda Silva (BME’15) won the $1,000 third place prize for their entry, “LickDat,” a device that monitors how frequently a laboratory mouse sucks on a water bottle containing a sweet, addictive, liquid food sample. Consisting of an Arduino (an open source electronics prototyping platform), LCD screen and liquid dispenser, the device was designed to support studies on food addiction conducted by the BU Medical School Laboratory of Addiction Genetics. Conventional lab equipment costs more than $300 and runs current through the mouse to detect each lick of the water bottle; LickDat costs less than $100 and uses capacitance sensors—a common technology in touchscreen surfaces—to detect licks. Here Tanner (left) and Silva (middle) offer Associate Professor Daniel Cole (ME) (right) the opportunity to put LickDat to the test by lightly touching the straw at the end of the water bottle.

Other 2014 Imagineering Contest Projects

2013 Winners

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First Prize

Smart Bike by Konstantinos Oikonomopoulos (ME’14) and Lanke A. Fu (ME’14)

 

Second Prize

Roommate Friendly Alarm Clock by John Aleman (ME’14) and Benjamin Corman (EE’14)

 

Third Prize (Tie)

Can of Corn by Yingming Wang (EE’13), Ajith Prasad (SMG’13) and Lalitha Kumaresan (EE’13)

Smart Medicine Cabinet by Benjamin Graham (ME’16)

 

2012 Winners

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First Prize

Low-cost Sounding Rocket by David Harris (ME’15)

 

Second Prize

Highly accurate, affordable, easy-to-assemble, desktop 3D printer by Konstantinos Oikonomopoulos (ME’14)

 

Third Prize

Low-cost personal wind turbine by Alex Kithes (EE’14) and Matthew Pollack (ME’14)