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CuPID (Cusp Plasma Imaging Detector), scheduled to launch in 2019, will use the first wide-field-of-view x-ray detector to study the interaction between the sun and Earth's magnetic field.
CuPID (Cusp Plasma Imaging Detector), scheduled to launch in 2019, will use the first wide-field-of-view x-ray detector to study the interaction between the sun and Earth's magnetic field.

Assistant Professor Brian Walsh (ME) plans to develop and launch a small x-ray imaging spacecraft to study the interaction between solar wind and the Earth’s magnetic field under a 4-year, $2.4 million NASA grant.

The goal of Cusp Plasma Imaging Detector (CuPID) is to use a wide-field-of-view x-ray telescope to learn how energy from the sun is transferred into the near-Earth space environment. Though astronomers have long used x-ray technology to collect data in space, Walsh’s approach is unique.

“In the past, x-ray telescopes on satellites have only had tiny, pencil-beams fields of view, which limited them to only collecting data in their immediate area,” says Walsh. “We have created the first wide-field-of-view x-ray detector, which will allow us to look at the big picture all at once. This will allow us to gain an understanding of the interaction between the sun and the Earth’s magnetic field and will assist in designing future spacecraft that can withstand the harsh space environment.”

Walsh, who is concurrently working with Professor Joshua Semeter (ECE) on small satellite research, will spearhead the project. He anticipates that researchers and students across a variety of disciplines at BU will work together to build the spacecraft while collaborating with partner institutions.

The mission, which is scheduled for launch in 2019, is being led by Boston University and involves collaborations from the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Johns Hopkins University, Drexel University and Merrimack College.

Assistant Professor Brian Walsh (ME)
Assistant Professor Brian Walsh (ME)