Winners of ME@BU Image Contest Announced

in NEWS

by Jasmine Carter

While research at Mechanical Engineering generates important discoveries, new ideas, and theories, it also produces beautiful and surreal images that can be appreciated by people who are in the filed of research and those who enjoy art alike.

This summer, BU’s Mechanical Engineering Department sought to show that research at BU can benefit society by the innovations that come from it as well as the artistic images that are produced as a by-product with its first annual Image Contest.

It was no easy task for the guest judge, prolific scientific image photographer, Felice Frankel, to decide on the winners. “I’ve had the pleasure of judging a series of science photography competitions, but I must say, this one was special for me. I was truly surprised to see such fascinating and beautiful work.” 

Top 3 Images

First Place – Charles Lissandrello

A word from our judge Felice Frankel:

“The fact that this image is documenting, in fact, a mistake, makes it even more intriguing for me. Let’s remember, there is always information in images capturing errors. This particular SEM is elegantly colored, without screaming at us…and beautifully composed. I knew it was a winner the moment I saw it.”

"Contamination" Epoxy contamination on a silicon substrate with a polymer structure nearby. Scale bar is 20 microns. Image acquired using a scanning electron microscope. Structure and image by Charles Lissandrello.
“Contamination”
Epoxy contamination on a silicon substrate with a polymer structure nearby. Scale bar is 20 microns. Image acquired using a scanning electron microscope. Structure and image by Charles Lissandrello.

Second Prize – Peter Walls

A word from our judge Felice Frankel:

“Wonderfully lit and carefully combined into a highly informative single photograph. A terrific image.”

"Imbibition" A glass tube filled with glass beads is fully submerged in a bath of silicone oil floating above dyed water. When the tube comes into contact with the water it spontaneously wicks into the tube displacing the oil leaving a fraction trapped behind. Taken by Peter Walls with a Nikon D7000 SLR and 200 mm macro lens
“Imbibition”
A glass tube filled with glass beads is fully submerged in a bath of silicone oil floating above dyed water. When the tube comes into contact with the water it spontaneously wicks into the tube displacing the oil leaving a fraction trapped behind.
Taken by Peter Walls with a Nikon D7000 SLR and 200 mm macro lens

Third Prize – Gabriel Smith

A word from our judge Felice Frankel:

“Most would put the focus of the image smack in the middle, But in this cleverly composed photograph, we pay more attention. And his color adjustments after the image was created is perfectly permissible since the colors in the case are not informational—just differentiating structure.”

Gabriel Smith_Auxetic-Metamaterial
“Auxetic Metamaterial” Photo is of an auxetic metamaterial sample undergoing tension tests, taken by Gabriel Smith using a traditional camera.

Honorable Mentions

"Kaleidoscope" by Aska Mukuti (CFA) High-speed camera to collect several images of liquid jets spontaneously breaking up. Drops were then arranged in a kaleidoscope pattern.
“Kaleidoscope” by Aska Mukuti (CFA)
High-speed camera to collect several images of liquid jets spontaneously breaking up. Drops were then arranged in a kaleidoscope pattern.

Title: Interference Trapped air in an ultra-viscous liquid create bubbles that interfere with one another. The bubble films become thin enough that variations in thickness are visible through optical interference. Here the bubbles are illuminated with two wavelengths of light, blue and red, and these colors interfere with themselves and with each other. Original color taken with Nikon camera. Underlying research is relevant to glass manufacturing and earth science. Photo taken by: Casey Bartlett & James Bird
Title: Interference
Trapped air in an ultra-viscous liquid create bubbles that interfere with one another. The bubble films become thin enough that variations in thickness are visible through optical interference. Here the bubbles are illuminated with two wavelengths of light, blue and red, and these colors interfere with themselves and with each other. Original color taken with Nikon camera. Underlying research is relevant to glass manufacturing and earth science.
Photo taken by: Casey Bartlett & James Bird

"Rise Swell" Douglas Holmes When you put a straw into a liquid, the liquid rises via capillary action - surface tension draws the fluid up while gravity pulls it down. The smaller the straw diameter, the higher the fluid rises. If the walls of that straw are flexible, the fluid rises higher still as surface tension pulls bends the walls closer together. This is what you see when bristles of a paintbrush or wet hairs clump together. Now, if the material is flexible and absorbent, like a sponge, the fluid will swell the walls, causing them to curl apart when wetted. In this image, two flexible and absorbent silicone rubber fibers are dipped into a bath of silicone oil. Initially, a balance between elasticity and capillarity pulls the fibers together, and then the swelling of the fluid into the material slowly curls the fibers apart. Eventually, the swelling-induced bending peeling them off the surface of the fluid bath.
“Rise Swell” Douglas Holmes
When you put a straw into a liquid, the liquid rises via capillary action – surface tension draws the fluid up while gravity pulls it down. The smaller the straw diameter, the higher the fluid rises. If the walls of that straw are flexible, the fluid rises higher still as surface tension pulls bends the walls closer together. This is what you see when bristles of a paintbrush or wet hairs clump together. Now, if the material is flexible and absorbent, like a sponge, the fluid will swell the walls, causing them to curl apart when wetted. In this image, two flexible and absorbent silicone rubber fibers are dipped into a bath of silicone oil. Initially, a balance between elasticity and capillarity pulls the fibers together, and then the swelling of the fluid into the material slowly curls the fibers apart. Eventually, the swelling-induced bending peeling them off the surface of the fluid bath.

 SEM image of a polymer structure printed using two-photon laser lithography. The object was intended to be a bridge, but poor adhesion on the substrate caused the structure to flip over mid print. Dried solvent droplets surround the structure from the development process. Structure and image by Rachael Jayne.
SEM image of a polymer structure printed using two-photon laser lithography. The object was intended to be a bridge, but poor adhesion on the substrate caused the structure to flip over mid print. Dried solvent droplets surround the structure from the development process.
Structure and image by Rachael Jayne.

 The cross section of a 3D printed mouse paw bone was imaged using SEM. Data from a MicroCT scan was used to create a 3D model which was then printed using two-photon polymerization. Intricate contours within the structure arose from the printing process. MicroCT files provided by Elise Morgan and Michael Webster, Structure designed by Jill Wu and Nourin Alsharif, Image by Rachael Jayne.
The cross section of a 3D printed mouse paw bone was imaged using SEM. Data from a MicroCT scan was used to create a 3D model which was then printed using two-photon polymerization. Intricate contours within the structure arose from the printing process. MicroCT files provided by Elise Morgan and Michael Webster, Structure designed by Jill Wu and Nourin Alsharif, Image by Rachael Jayne.

Interlocking polymer chainlinks created using two-photon polymerization in a direct-write 3D lithography system. Scale bar is 10 microns. Image acquired using a scanning electron microscope.  Structure and image by Charles Lissandrello.
Interlocking polymer chainlinks created using two-photon polymerization in a direct-write 3D lithography system. Scale bar is 10 microns. Image acquired using a scanning electron microscope.
Structure and image by Charles Lissandrello.

The image is of pressurized graphene membranes. It is inspired by the famous painting: Squares with concentric rings" by Wassily Kandinsky. The picture uses AFM images from our recent paper Molecular valves for controlling gas phase transport made from discrete angstrom-sized pores in graphene L. Wang, L. W. Drahushuk, L. Cantley, S. P. Koenig, X. Liu, J. Pellegrino, M.S. Strano, and J. S. Bunch, to appear Nature Nanotechnology.  Scott Bunch conceived the idea for the picture, and the picture was created by David Lloyd, BU ME Ph.D. student.
The image is of pressurized graphene membranes. It is inspired by the famous painting: Squares with concentric rings” by Wassily Kandinsky. The picture uses AFM images from our recent paper “Molecular valves for controlling gas phase transport made from discrete angstrom-sized pores in graphene” L. Wang, L. W. Drahushuk, L. Cantley, S. P. Koenig, X. Liu, J. Pellegrino, M.S. Strano, and J. S. Bunch, to appear Nature Nanotechnology.
Scott Bunch conceived the idea for the picture, and the picture was created by David Lloyd, BU ME Ph.D. student.