ENG Graduate Students’ Posters Attain Top Honors

in NEWS

Two College of Engineering graduate students were recently honored with Best Poster Awards by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and the Center for Integration of Medicine & Innovative Technology (CIMIT), respectively.

I-Kuan Lin was selected for his poster, “Elastic and Viscoelastic Characterization and Modeling of Polymer based Structures for Biological Applications,” at the ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition. It was among only five selected out of a pool of 166 posters by more than 300 competing graduate students and industry professionals.

“At a conference that large, it’s a great honor to see the quality of my work recognized by the leading names in mechanical engineering,” I-Kuan, a student in the Mechanical Engineering Department, said.

The poster describes the fundamental characterization of soft polymer materials and their mechanical behavior for biomedical applications in sensors and lab-on-a-chip micro fluidic devices.

“I-Kuan’s work and research tackles important problems in mechanical and biological applications,” said Associate Professor Xin Zhang (ME). “Understanding the fundamental mechanical issues of soft polymer materials can lead to real developments in high-level applications on the micro- and nano-scale.”

Jane Y. Zhang, a biomedical engineering student, was honored at the CIMIT Innovation Congress. Her poster, “In situ Fabrication of Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Substrate in Microfluidic Chip for Ultrasensitive Infectious Disease Detection,” won top honors in the Most Innovative Research category.

The poster describes methods for rapid and highly sensitive detection of infectious disease using a disposable micro-fluidic device. Zhang’s work in Professor Catherine Klapperich’s (ME) lab aims to detect biologically relevant levels of bacteria with disposable polymer chips, particularly for fast and highly sensitive infectious disease screenings at point-of-care testing in low-resource areas.

“Our goal is to detect disease as fast as possible,” Zhang said. “We’re currently detecting the disease at the e-coli level. We hope to eventually evolve to detecting and differentiating between infectious pathogens, such as distinguishing normal flu-like symptoms from more potent diseases such as SARS.”
 

College of Engineering graduate students I-Kuan Lin (top) and Jane Y. Zhang were recently honored with Best Poster Awards from the ASME and CIMIT, respectively.
College of Engineering graduate students I-Kuan Lin (top) and Jane Y. Zhang were recently honored with Best Poster Awards from the ASME and CIMIT, respectively.