Ian Sue Wing

wingAssociate Professor
Department of Earth and Environment
Research Affiliate, Center for Energy and Environmental Studies
College of Arts and Sciences

PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

isw@bu.edu
(617) 353-5741
webpage

Research Interests:

  • Carbon emission policy
  • Modeling energy technical change

Courses Taught:

CAS GE325 & EE425/625 Environmental Policy Analysis
CAS GE425/EE320 US Environmental Policy
CAS GG512 Climate Change Policy Analysis and Modeling
CAS IR292 Fundamentals of International Economics

Brief Biography:

Dr. Ian Sue Wing is an Associate Professor in the Department of Earth and Environment at Boston University (BU), a research affiliate of the Centers for Energy & Environmental Studies and Transportation Studies at BU, the Joint Program on the Science & Policy of Global Change at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), and a 2005-6 REPSOL-YPF Energy Fellow at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government. He holds a PhD in Technology, Management & Policy from MIT and a MSc in economics from Oxford University, where he was the 1994 Commonwealth Caribbean Rhodes Scholar. Dr. Sue Wing conducts research and teaching on the economic analysis of energy and environmental policy, with an emphasis on climate change and computational general equilibrium (CGE) analysis of economies’ adjustment to policy shocks. His current research includes investigation of the impacts at the state and regional level of current U.S. proposals to mitigate climate change, sources of long-run change in the energy intensity of the U.S. economy, the theoretical and empirical analysis of induced technological change, the long-run effects of trade-mediated international productivity spillovers for global carbon emissions and leakage, and the implications of different methods of representing endogenous technological change in CGE models for climate change policy analysis. He has been supported by grants from the California Energy Commission and the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science, and has been a member of advisory panels for the DOE, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the National Research Council.