Kevin Smith

smithProfessor
Department of Physics
College of Arts and Sciences

PhD, Yale University

ksmith@physics.bu.edu
(617) 353-6451
webpage

Research Interests:

Synchrotron-radiation based x-ray spectroscopic studies of the electronic structure of materials. Systems of fundamental scientific and technological interest are investigated, with definitive measurements made of their surface, bulk, interface, and nano-scale electronic properties. Among the spectroscopies used are angle resolved photoemission, soft x-ray emission, resonant inelastic x-ray scattering, and x-ray absorption. See theĀ Novel Materials Laboratory site for more information.

Brief Biography:

Kevin Smith is a Professor of Physics and Professor of Chemistry at Boston University. He received a BA in Physics from Trinity College Dublin in 1983, and a PhD in Applied Physics from Yale University in 1988. He then spent three years as a postdoctoral research associate with the University of Oregon. He was based full time at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory for two of those three years. He joined the Department of Physics at Boston University in 1991. His research program focuses on the soft x-ray spectroscopic study of the surface and bulk electronic structure of novel materials. The primary techniques used in his research are soft x-ray emission spectroscopy, resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering, and photoemission spectroscopy. All of his research is undertaken at synchrotron radiation facilities, primarily the National Synchrotron Light Source and the Advanced Light Source. The material systems presently under investigation include correlated and low dimensional solids, thin film organic semiconductors, transparent conducting oxides, and thin film rare-earth nitrides. He has co-authored over 100 publications and has delivered 112 invited talks. Aside from his research accomplishments, Kevin Smith is a prize winning teacher, having been awarded the Boston University Metcalf Cup and Prize for Excellence in Teaching in 1999, and was named the Massachusetts Professor of the Year by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching in 2001. He has numerous national and international collaborations, and spent his most recent sabbatical at the Advanced Light Source, and as a Visiting Professor with the Department of Physics, Uppsala University, in Sweden. He is a member of the American Physical Society, the Materials Research Society, and a Fellow of the American Vacuum Society.