News

Giles’ Commitment to Advancing Industry Prowess and Advocating for Diversity Inclusion

By gmcnevin
December 1st, 2015 in Awards, ECE, Faculty, News-CE, Recognition, Uncategorized.

Giles has recently accepted key roles aimed at progressing the field of astronomy and of supercomputing; all while, continuing his role as a STEM diversity advocate.

By Gabriella McNevin and Rebecca Jahnke (COM ‘17)

ECE Professor Roscoe Giles

ECE Professor Roscoe Giles

Roscoe Giles is a Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Boston University (BU). Within the last few months, Giles has become involved with a $864-million cooperative agreement to manage the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). He has also accepted an invitation to aid in the development of U.S. supercomputing policies.

In October, 2015, Giles started a two-year term as Chair of the Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI) Board of Trustees. The following month, NSF approved the largest cooperative agreement the astronomy division has ever granted. A 10-year, $864-million cooperative contract with AUI to manage the NRAO. This record breaking contract will tie AUI leadership to the core goals of astronomical research embraced by NRAO.

Also in October, Giles was invited to the White House’s National Strategic Computing Initiative (NCSI) Workshop. NCSI was established by President Obama’s executive order to ensure the United States continues its role as a supercomputing pioneer in the coming decades. The workshop sought to jumpstart ideas for a cohesive, multi-agency strategy. While at the workshop, he and other industry, academic, and government leaders discussed the challenges and opportunities associated with the increase in computing demands and the heightened role of big data in the ever-evolving technological landscape.

Giles is no stranger to government policy. Having served as Chairman of the United States Department of Energy’s Advanced Scientific Computing Advisory Committee from 2008 to 2015, Giles directly influenced the management and direction of federal scientific computing programs.

Giles’ expansive research interests provide a broad foundation to draw upon. Giles started his education studying physics. He obtained his Bachelor’s of Arts degree with honors from the University of Chicago and received Master’s of Science and Ph.D. degrees from Stanford University.

Giles shifted his focus to electrical and computer engineering upon joining Boston University in 1985. Giles is focused on advanced computer architectures, distributed and parallel computing and computation science.

On LinkedIn, Roscoe Giles describes himself simply as an optimist intent to push “the envelope of computing and science in the large.”

Giles is well acquainted with national initiatives to increase diversity in STEM fields. Giles is listed by the Career Communications Group as one of the “50 Most Important Blacks in Research Science,” and was the first African American to earn a theoretical physics PH.D. from Stanford. Additionally, Giles was the first ever African American conference chairman of the Supercomputing Conference, which took place in Baltimore, Maryland in 2002

To that effect, Giles has been lauded not just for his research, but also for his community outreach. Giles was a Founder and Executive Director for the Institute of African American E-Culture. The foundation worked to open access to information technology to minorities and disadvantaged communities across the country. Giles won the Computing Research Association (CRA) A. Nico Habermann Award for his service as a faculty adviser and Minority Engineers Society Mentor.

At the Boston University Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Giles has received recognition including Scholar-Teacher of the Year in 1992. In 1996, Giles won Boston University’s College of Engineering Award for Excellence in Teaching.

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ECE PhD Student Wins ACM Research Competition in Design Automation

By gmcnevin
December 1st, 2015 in Awards, ECE, Faculty, Graduate Programs, Graduate Student Opportunities, Graduate Students, News-CE, Research-CE.

By Rebecca Jahnke (COM ’17) 

CoskunOnur

ECE PhD student Onur Sahin (left) and advisor Professor Ayse Coskun (right) stand in the Performance and Energy-Aware Computing Laboratory (PeacLab) at Boston University.

ECE PhD student Onur Sahin won first prize this November at the Association for Computing Machinery’s (ACM) Special Interest Group on Design Automation (SIGDA) Student Research Competition. Sahin, who is advised by ECE Professor Ayse Coskun, won for his project on providing sustainable performance to mobile device users, titled “Pushing QoS-Awareness into Thermal Management for Sustainable User Experience in Mobile Devices

Sahin soared through the competition’s multiple rounds at the International Conference on Computer Aided Design (ICCAD) in Austin. Contestants had entered by submitting a write-up describing their research focuses, the novel aspects of their approaches and the impact their projects could have on society. Sahin was among the 20 entrants invited to the poster presentation at the ICCAD, and the five subsequently selected by industry and academic judges to proceed. Those five delivered 10-minute presentations before a judging panel, where they were assessed for their knowledge of their areas, contributions of their research and the quality of their presentations. Judges named Sahin winner following this round.

Sahin’s project idea is a response to modern mobile devices that have significantly increased computational abilities, but generate significant amounts of heat and power dissipation. Unlike other computation devices, mobile devices’ limited battery-life and small size limit their cooling capabilities. This poses a problem for the many users who run computationally intensive applications – like gaming, browsing, media and data processing – for extended durations.

Currently, mobile devices employ a thermal throttling mechanism to slow the devices and reduce their temperatures. However, this reduces performance levels and degrades the user experience.

Sahin’s project addresses the drawbacks of current thermal throttling techniques to mitigate thermal limitations on smartphones. By instituting techniques that prevent an application from boosting performance beyond what is actually required to run that application, Sahin proposes that heating can be slowed. This will allow users to interact with their devices for longer at higher performance levels. Having experimented with real-life smartphones, Sahin and his team reassure that their technology can be easily integrated into current mobile devices.

This competition is one of the several student research competitions annually co-located with ACM sponsored conferences. Each conference focuses on a different major area of computing. The competition is sponsored by Microsoft Research and allows undergraduate and graduate students across computing disciplines to gain visibility for their research projects and finesse their abilities to effectively communicate their ideas.

Sahin will join winners from all conferences to compete in the ACM Grand Final against researchers from all computing areas. From there, the top three contenders and their advisors will receive formal recognition at the ACM Awards Banquet, where the Turing Award – the highest distinction in computer science – is presented annually.

Further information regarding the competition and the winners are provided at http://src.acm.org/winners.html.

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ECE and ME Seniors Bring 2015 National SpaceVision Conference to BU

By Bhumika Salwan
November 23rd, 2015 in Awards, ECE, Events, Faculty, Publications, Recognition, Research, Research-CE, Students, Uncategorized, Undergraduate Programs, Undergraduate Student Opportunities.

By Rebecca Jahnke (COM ‘17) and Bhumika Salwan (Questrom ’16)

BU Engineering seniors Mehmet Akbulut (ME ‘16) and Dean De Carli (EE ‘16) served as the SEDS SpaceVision 2015 Chair of Operations and Chair of Programming. Photo by Bhumika Salwan (Questrom ’16).

BU Engineering seniors Dean De Carli (EE ‘16) and Mehmet Akbulut (ME ’16) served as the SEDS SpaceVision 2015 Chair of Programming and Chair of Operations. Photo by Bhumika Salwan (Questrom ’16).

 Boston University hosted over 300 attendees November 12-15th at the Metcalf Trustee Center for the Students for the Exploration and Development of Space (SEDS) SpaceVision 2015 Conference. The  conference is entirely student-run and space-centric. It bills itself as connecting present with future space leaders and is part of international nonprofit SEDS’ larger mission to empower students through the high school, undergraduate and graduate levels to impact space exploration.

BU Engineering seniors Mehmet Akbulut (ME ‘16) and Dean De Carli (EE ‘16) spearheaded conference planning. Both Akbulut and De Carli, who served as the Chair of Operations and Chair of Programming, respectively, had attended the 2013 Arizona SpaceVision Conference. After pondering why the conference had yet to be hosted in a major city like Boston, the pair submitted a bid to post the conference at Boston University and successfully secured the 2015 venue nomination.

Akbulut oversaw logistics, registration, personnel, and general operations of the event while De Carli took charge of programming and speakers. Together, they developed an agenda that featured industry speakers, panels, a business plan competition, and a first-ever peer mentor session. By bringing students together with leaders in the aerospace community, the conference offered attendees invaluable networking opportunities and the chance to view the future of space development through an interdisciplinary lens.

The SEDS,  SpaceVision, Rocket Propulsion, and small satellite efforts at BU are all truly interdisciplinary and interdepartmental. This creates a forum for students in different concentrations to work as a team and further learning in fields such as space research. Both Akbulut and De Carli attribute their success running SpaceVision 2015 to the education and leadership opportunities they’ve had in the College of Engineering and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE).

Six space professionals offered career advice. From left to right, Chair of SEDS-USA Hannah Kerner (moderator), Executive Director of Society of Satellite Professionals International Robert Bell, Advanced Propulsion Manufacturing & Integration Engineer at Virgin Galactic Kevin Zagorski, Avionics Engineer at Firefly Space Systems Drew Kelley, Propulsion Components Engineer at United Launch Alliance Matt Cannella, and Director of Lunar Programs at Way Paver Labs Patrick Gray. Photo by Bhumika Salwan (Questrom ’16).

“ECE has prepared me to help with SpaceVision by giving me the opportunity to lead in student groups such as Boston University Rocket Proposal Group. It’s given me the leadership skills that I have been able to translate into a much larger scale such as being Chair of this conference,” De Carli said.

The College of Engineering, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Center for Space Physics jointly sponsored the conference. Outside sponsors included Arizona State University School of Earth and Science Exploration and industry sponsors like Lockheed Martin.

 

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Industry Partners Established for Massachusetts Open Cloud (MOC)

By Bhumika Salwan
November 13th, 2015 in ECE, Faculty, News-CE, Research-CE, Uncategorized.

MOC successfully rallies academia, government and industry in developing new cloud.

By Rebecca Jahnke (COM ’17)

MOC Cloud is the first Open Cloud Exchange implemented and designed in Massachusetts. Graphic by Corelyn Blog.

The Massachusetts Open Cloud (MOC) project – led by ECE Professor Orran Krieger – just announced a set of core industry partners, spanning key hardware, software and services industry sectors. The MOC is an ambitious project that aims to create a public cloud, based on a revolutionary model for a multi-provider Open Cloud eXchange (OCX).

In existing public clouds one provider operates the entire cloud.  In contrast, the OCX model underlying the MOC allows for multiple entities to provide computing resources and services in a level playing field. Having multiple providers – all with their own specialties – participating in the same cloud will enable a broader range of users and applications to be supported.

The core corporate partners of the MOC – Brocade, Cisco, Intel, Lenovo, Red Hat and Two Sigma – have made financial commitments as well as in-kind commitments, ranging from computer infrastructure in support of MOC deployment and operation, to engineering expertise to support the development of OCX functionality. The companies have also pledged executive sponsors to keep company and project goals aligned and to support MOC’s development. These new partnerships underscore the strong and growing industry support for the project, which has already secured in excess of  $14 million of funding – more than quadruple the $3 million in seed funding that the MOC received from the Mass Tech Collaborative in 2014.

ECE Professor Orran Krieger is the head of the MOC Project.

ECE Professor Orran Krieger is the head of the MOC Project.

Incubated at and seed-funded by the Hariri Institute for Computing at BU (as part of the Cloud Computing Initiative led by its Director, Orran Krieger), this complex project has benefitted from strong BU institutional and administrative support, including the offices of the Provost, Corporate Relations, General Council, and IS&T Research Computing.  Anchored at BU, the project is a collaboration that also involves Harvard University, MIT, UMass, and Northeastern University, as well as the Massachusetts Green High-Performance Computing Center (MGHPCC).  The project leverages and builds on current and prior research by a number of ECE and CS faculty members at BU including Jonathan Appavoo, Azer Bestavros, Ran Canetti, Ayse Coskun, and Orran Krieger.

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Kulis Named First Levine Career Development Professor

By Rebecca Jahnke
November 12th, 2015 in Awards, Courses, ECE, Faculty, News-CE, Recognition, Research, Research-CE, Students, Undergraduate Student Opportunities.

ECE Assistant Prof is Rising Star in Machine Learning

By Michael S. Goldberg

Brian Kulis

Assistant Professor Brian Kulis (ECE). Photo by Cydney Scott.

To Brian Kulis, advances in machine learning and artificial intelligence bring with them the opportunity to mesh theory with real-world applications, like driverless cars and computers that can describe aloud the objects in front of them.

“You want computers to be able to recognize what they are seeing in images and video,” says Kulis, a College of Engineering assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering. “For instance, can it recognize all the objects in a picture? Or a more difficult problem would be, can it look at a video and describe in English what is happening in the video? That is a major application area for machine learning these days.”

Kulis’ expertise in machine learning, along with his research in computer vision systems and other applications, brought him to BU this fall and has earned him the University’s inaugural Peter J. Levine Career Development Professorship, which will be awarded annually to rising junior faculty in the electrical and computer engineering department. The professorship’s three-year stipend will support scholarly and laboratory work. It was established by a gift from Peter J. Levine (ENG’83), a partner at the Silicon Valley venture capital firm Andreesen Horowitz and a part-time faculty member at Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business.

Kulis is a rising star in the machine learning field and the Levine professorship speaks to BU’s recognition of his achievements thus far, says Kenneth R. Lutchen, dean of ENG, and is a commitment to helping Kulis build on his world-class research and teaching.

Lutchen adds that Kulis, who earlier this year also received a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award for research into machine learning systems, will be a critical faculty member of ENG’s new master’s degree specialization in data analytics.

“We think it will be one of the most popular specializations we have, and it will be accessible not just to students in this department, but also to biomedical, mechanical engineering, and systems engineering students who will want to have this same specialization. Brian’s expertise is perfectly aligned with teaching this,” Lutchen says.

Also a College of Arts & Sciences assistant professor of computer science, Kulis earned a bachelor’s degree in computer science and mathematics at Cornell University and a doctorate in computer science at the University of Texas at Austin. He did postdoctoral work at the University of California, Berkeley, then spent three years on the faculty of Ohio State University before coming to BU.

Millions or billions of data points

Data science is about managing huge data sets—think millions or billions of data points, from an array of sources—and programming computers to analyze the data and make predictions based on identified patterns. Advances in storing and analyzing these growing collections of information has made Big Data a hot field in both academia and industry, with Harvard Business Review pronouncing data scientist “the sexiest job of the 21st century.”

Those advances include artificial intelligence and machine learning, and they are what enable Kulis to develop exciting connections between theory and action. “There is a nice combination between the mathematics and the theoretical aspects of machine learning. It’s a very applied field, trying to solve real problems,” he says. “That balance is pretty rare.”

He describes his specific area of research as scalable nonparametric machine learning. While a traditional statistical model for analyzing a large amount of data would establish a model for performing the analysis, Kulis pursues a different method. In his research, the data itself determines how simple or complicated the analysis should be.

An example of this approach, he says, is analyzing a large collection of documents for the content they contain. A parametric model would establish 10 clusters of documents to analyze, one each on a set topic. A nonparametric model would instead analyze all of the documents and determine how many topics should be included in the analysis. “You want the data itself to guide the discovery process, and so if there is a lot to say, then you want your algorithm to reveal that structure,” he says. “It’s a more flexible way to do analysis.”

The field is ripe for approaches that allow researchers from different fields–biology and business, for example–to apply machine learning techniques to develop new ways of looking at the data they collect. Kulis says he is looking forward to working with faculty and students from different BU departments both in research and in his courses. “Machine learning brings together a lot of fields that for a long time have been fairly disjoined. When it comes to teaching, a lot of my excitement is in trying to bridge these different disciplines and to teach courses that bring together people from different areas,” he says.

The curriculum, Lutchen says, has relevance to the world at large: “As an engineering faculty, we want people to understand how these new tools and techniques can help society.”

Michael S. Goldberg can be reached at michaelscottgoldberg@gmail.com.

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BU Satellite Team Gets Big Boost from NASA

By gmcnevin
November 10th, 2015 in Awards, ECE, Events, Faculty, Graduate Programs, Graduate Student Opportunities, Recognition, Students, Uncategorized, Video.

Wireless Sensors Developed by Interdisciplinary Engineering Team to be Launched into Space

By Rich Barlow Video by Joe Chan for BU Today

On March 10, 1989, a solar eruption blasted plasma toward Earth. Canadian utility Hydro-Quebec noticed a hop-skip-and-jump in the voltage on its grid two days later. On March 13, with plasma sweeping Earth’s magnetic field and causing electric currents in the outer atmosphere, the grid shut down, plunging the province into darkness for nine hours.

Such bolts from the blue (or black) of space rarely wreak such havoc. But less severe irritants—interrupted radio transmissions, disrupted GPS devices, even rusting of pipelines—can result when electric currents course through the magnetic field, says Joshua Semeter, who’d like to know more about this phenomenon (largely because the magnetic field may be an essential ingredient for life on Earth). So would the federal government, which is why NASA has agreed to launch a network of wireless sensors named ANDESITE, developed by Semeter’s College of Engineering students to study changes in Earth’s magnetic field caused by space weather.

It is the final frontier, finally crossed: the first space launch for eight-year-old BU Student-satellite for Applications and Training, overseen by Semeter (ENG’92,’97), an ENG professor of electrical and computer engineering. Colloquially known as BUSAT, the program engages students in designing and operating small satellites. Earlier this year, the BUSAT group was one of the teams from a half dozen universities that beat out nine competitors to continue receiving support from the Air Force, which has contributed more than $500,000 to BUSAT projects. (BU also provided funding.) NASA will set a date for the launch late this year, Semeter says, assuming the agency’s review shows that ANDESITE’s ejecting sensors “won’t blow up their vehicle.”

ANDESITE sensors are DVD-sized boxes packed with electronics boards, and eight of them will hitch a ride on a NASA spacecraft that will spit them out roughly 280 miles above the Earth. Each sensor, traveling at a speed of approximately six miles per second, will complete an orbit of the Earth in roughly 90 minutes. The sensors will measure variations in electrical currents flowing in and out of the upper atmosphere along Earth’s magnetic field. “From this we will learn about how turbulence forms in space plasmas and what the eventual effects of this will be” on things like radio signals, allowing for better modeling of those effects, Semeter says.

ANDESITE’s success has already led to one terrestrial development, he adds. ENG has hired Brian Walsh (GRS’09,’12) as an associate professor of mechanical engineering. Walsh researches small satellites and space technology.

“This whole idea of taking any kind of spacecraft and spitting out small sub-payloads is really experimental,” says Semeter.
“This whole idea of taking any kind of spacecraft and spitting out small sub-payloads is really experimental,” says Semeter, although ANDESITE employs “technology that’s very well established here on Earth. They use it for self-driving cars and finding cabs in a city; Uber uses this kind of thing. This is wireless mesh network technology.…Our innovation was, why can’t we use that in space? What science could you do?”

In July, government representatives visited the students’ lab at the Engineering Product Innovation Center for a demonstration of how the sensors would deploy during an upcoming zero-gravity test flight, a nausea-inducing trial that previous BUSAT students have experienced firsthand. The students rigged a contraption to gently fire sensors into a mesh net, a form of soccer-meets-space.

“Looks like a good setup,” Zane Singleton of the Defense Department’s Space Test Program and tech company MEI Technologies said at the demonstration.

Earlier in the history of miniaturized satellites, “NASA didn’t give a rat’s ass” about them, Semeter says, with one official harrumphing, “Why would somebody who drives a Ferrari care about Matchboxes?” Then the National Science Foundation convinced NASA that solid science research could be done by mini-satellites. Today, ANDESITE is but one government effort to study space weather. Last February, a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellite was launched to record data about solar wind.

Cody Nabong (ENG’15), ANDESITE’s project manager, joined BUSAT on a buddy’s recommendation after being stymied in his search for an internship. (A picture of his friend on a zero-gravity flight was a grabber.) “I’ve been interested in aerospace since I came here, so it wasn’t a hard decision,” says Nabong, who appreciates the hands-on practice of the classroom concepts he’s studied that the team has provided. “The computer program that you use to make your 3-D models—I got a lot of practice with that. And then I learned a bunch about communications stuff that I wouldn’t have been exposed to if I had just had courses.…The biggest thing I’ve learned is how you meet requirements for an engineering project,” he says, referring to the government competitions and reviews the ANDESITE project has hurdled.

If the foregoing sounds uber-Star Trek-y, BUSAT’s members include some liberal arts disciplines majors who came for graduate engineering study through BU’s LEAP (Late Entry Accelerated Program) initiative. One BUSAT alumnus was a building contractor from San Francisco, who was “perfectly suited for this job,” says Semeter. “He’s used to going to the project site, telling people what to do. That’s all we needed. And he was technically competent.”

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BU Hackathon Draws 500, Co-Sponsored by ECE & CAS

By gmcnevin
November 5th, 2015 in ECE, Uncategorized.

By Rich Barlow, BU Today

The movies’ mad genius took something unappetizing—bits and pieces of bodies—and stitched them into an equally unattractive monster. By contrast, ScareBear’s BU student inventors started with an adorable teddy bear and, through the magic of computer science, transformed it into a furry fiend, its eyes flashing demonic red while it growled, “I’ve got something for you,” in ghoulish tones.

But while Frankenstein labored in solitude, ScareBear was born amid 500 student hackers who packed Metcalf Hall for BU’s Halloween weekend hackathon. While competitors worked on their own projects—an app to summon a ride home if you were too drunk to drive, an online stick figure aping the gestures of a person standing before a motion detector—ScareBear’s four BU creators disemboweled their teddy to install hardware, plucked its brown glass eyes to place red lights underneath, and designed the app putting the scare in ScareBear.

“OK, so it smells a little bit,” shrugged Nicholas Maresco (ENG’17), after hot glue spilled on wiring, exuding a burning stink. “Only you can prevent forest fires,” quipped teammate Brian Tan (ENG’16), pushing the bear motif. Later, Maresco confessed, “That’s our second Raspberry Pi. We fried the first one.” He wasn’t talking about lunch. Raspberry Pi is a credit-card sized computer, and the team needed one to communicate with the creature-controlling app.

The project punctuated what the BU organizers called a “Hacky Halloween,” the University’s third annual computer competition. This year’s event outdrew the previous two, with even two busloads of Canadian participants coming in.

Creating a demonic teddy bear were, clockwise from upper left, Nicholas Maresco, Doug Roeper, Brian Tan, and Pablo Velarde. Photo by Kristyn Ulanday

Creating a demonic teddy bear were, clockwise from upper left, Nicholas Maresco, Doug Roeper, Brian Tan, and Pablo Velarde. Photo by Kristyn Ulanday

 

The hackathon stretched from Saturday afternoon to Sunday afternoon, when the hackers hunched over their laptops like medieval monks transcribing scripture, racing to complete their projects. (Those who were conscious, that is. Several heads slumped on the tables, napping after little or no sleep overnight. One table had an inflatable mattress on standby on the floor.)

“Sleep isn’t a huge concern,” said Sean Smith (CAS’17), one of the event organizers. “It’s kind of the culture. You get together and you have 24 hours and the time pressure and adrenaline of working with other people, and having this deadline makes you get a lot done.”

Hackathons, which have sprouted on many campuses in the last decade, offer computer enthusiasts opportunities they can’t always get in classes. “It’s really intense, but when you have an idea, it’s fun to go and really knock it out,” said Ben Lawson (CAS’17), whose team project was to use texting, rather than the internet, to code a computer. Lawson pointed out that the event’s corporate sponsors are often a good bet for internship and job possibilities.

“Hackathon” may be a bit of a misnomer, evoking for nontechies an image of information thievery. But “the connotation of the term is changing a lot,” said Smith. “Facebook and Mark Zuckerberg really have championed this term of hacking as a collaborative way of coding quickly. And really, what it means is taking all these tools that you have available and figuring out how to put them together well. Whole companies are built doing the things that people are doing at hackathons.”

After 24 hours of hacking, ScareBear’s cuddly exterior masked a computer-generated, ghoulish growl. Photo by Rich Barlow

After 24 hours of hacking, ScareBear’s cuddly exterior masked a computer-generated, ghoulish growl. Photo by Rich Barlow

 

Indeed, several major corporations, among them Microsoft, Liberty Mutual, and Capital One, sponsored the hackathon. With some additional funding from BU, the companies covered a budget of about $100,000, including meals and a $12,500 rented generator to power all those computers whose batteries died during the marathon competition. The event was organized by the student group MakeBU, which organizes weekly hack nights on campus and hackathons at BU and elsewhere, along with BUILDS, another student hacking group, and it was sanctioned by Major League Hacking, the NFL of competitive student coding.

Teams came up with their own projects, which were evaluated by 15 judges, mostly from the technology industry. Completing a project was less important that the quality and feasibility of the idea. “If you didn’t finish a project,” Smith said, “but you have this awesome idea and you can show some functionality, then you could probably be a strong contender. Things that are easy, things that have been done before, are generally not going to do that well in the judging.”

The top prize went to a team from Purdue, Carnegie Mellon, and New York University, which built an app that breached the telephone/internet barrier, enabling a telephone caller to converse with a search engine, Bing, and find medical advice. The advice was converted from text to speech and relayed back to the user over the phone.

Neither ScareBear nor any BU team walked away with prizes for top projects, but for the organizers, winning wasn’t the point. “We want it to be fun and collaborative,” said Smith. “We don’t want it to be competitive or cutthroat. We want people to work together and meet new people and learn new things and maybe have something that they can put on their résumé.”

As ScareBear cocreator Doug Roeper (ENG’17) put it, “It’s like, whatever we want, we can implement, whether it works or not. We could try.”

ECE’s Quantum Code Master

By Bhumika Salwan
November 2nd, 2015 in ECE, Faculty, News-CE, Research, Research-CE.

Using the strange laws of quantum mechanics to encrypt the world’s most secret messages

By Kate Becker, originally published in BU Research

Alexander Sergienko, a professor of electrical and computer engineering, is working to keep encrypted information safe, even over long distances. Photo by Cydney Scott

Alexander Sergienko, a professor of electrical and computer engineering, is working to keep encrypted information safe, even over long distances. Photo by Cydney Scott

Just outside Washington, DC, a heavily armored truck, protected by armed guards, rumbles toward the Pentagon. Its cargo is critical to keeping the most sensitive government communications secret. But it’s not what you might expect. That precious cargo is nothing but numbers.

Though the details are a government secret, according to Alexander Sergienko, a Boston University College of Engineering professor of electrical and computer engineering, trucks like this are one likely way that the United States government might transport the numbers that are at the heart of the only unbreakable encryption technique in the world: the one-time pad. The one-time pad is a string of random numbers, also called a key, which a sender uses to encrypt her message.

But the one-time pad has one big weakness: the random numbers that are the key to coding and decoding it have to be physically transported from one place to another. Sending them over the internet, encrypted by traditional security measures, would be like locking the keys to Fort Knox inside a child’s piggy bank. If the numbers are intercepted, the code is worthless. So, how can you get random numbers from place to place with absolute security? The answer isn’t more armed guards and armored trucks, says Sergienko, who also has an appointment as a professor of physics in BU’s College of Arts & Sciences. It’s quantum mechanics, the bizarre set of rules that governs the subatomic world, where the everyday norms we take for granted—that an object should have a well-defined location and speed, for instance, and that it can only be in one place at a time—go out the window.

The one-time pad encryption method dates back to before World War II, and was used to secure diplomatic communiqués and wartime dispatches. The sender encrypts her message by taking each letter, or bit, of the original message and combining it mathematically with successive random numbers from the key, transforming it into a sequence of totally random numbers. (The longer the message, the longer the key must be: a message that’s 100 letters long requires a key of at least 100 digits.) The encrypted message is now absolutely secure: the sender can broadcast it over a radio or even scream it from the rooftops, if she wants. Only someone with an identical copy of the key can crack the code, by subtracting a matching set of numbers from the broadcast to unlock it. But the key is unbreakable only if it is used just once; if used a second time, code breakers can begin to reverse-engineer the random-number list. With every additional use, the code gets weaker and weaker, so the bank of random numbers must be constantly refilled to keep secure government communication going. That means more numbers, more armored trucks—and more effort and expense.

Sergienko is one of a group of physicists and computer scientists at BU and beyond working to solve this problem with an encryption technique called secure quantum key distribution. They are harnessing cutting-edge technology to implement basic protocols that are some 30 years old. Quantum key distribution exploits the strange laws of quantum mechanics to create a truly random key that is totally secure from eavesdroppers.

Here’s how it works. Each “bit” of the key is encoded in the polarization of a single photon—essentially, the direction in which the light particle is “waving.” It can be up, down, or anything in between. In this case, though, each photon is prepared set in only one of two “bases”—horizontal/vertical, where horizontal might represent a one and vertical a zero; or tilted at an angle, with 45 degrees up representing one and 45 degrees down representing zero.

Sergienko maps out how it works using three characters well known to physics students: Alice, who’s sending the message; Bob, who is receiving it; and Eve, an eavesdropper out to covertly intercept it. To read out the state of each incoming photon, Bob has to pick the correct base. Alice can’t tell him the bases in advance, so he guesses randomly. Later, Alice reports the bases she used for each photon, and Bob throws away the readings for which he picked the wrong base. The result: Bob and Alice end up with identical, random strings of ones and zeros that they can use as a fresh key for their future communications.

If eavesdropper Eve tries to intercept photons traveling from Alice to Bob, Bob will notice a shortage of incoming photons. Eve could attempt to hide the theft by copying the polarization of each stolen photon and sending it on to Bob, but the laws of quantum mechanics, which make it impossible to perfectly “clone” the quantum state of a photon, get in her way, so she is bound to make mistakes that betray her presence. So, not only do Alice and Bob have truly random keys in hand, they also have the ultimate security against eavesdroppers: the laws of physics.

That’s the easy part, from Sergienko’s point of view. The hard part: making this technique work over practical distances. That’s because, to retain the quantum properties that make them so useful for secure communication, photons have to be kept isolated from all external disturbances. Another challenge: the same “no-cloning” law that thwarted Eve prohibits the use of any amplifiers, standard in traditional telecommunications, on the optical lines that transmit the photons. “One single photon has to travel from point A to point B,” says Sergienko. It’s as if the code were written on eggshells. How can you send millions or billions of those eggshells, far and fast?

“It’s a dilemma,” says Sergienko. “The quantum realm gives you more opportunities, but to make these opportunities work for people, you have to solve the problem of how the quantum state will survive in the classical environment,” the messy reality in which it’s nearly impossible to avoid interacting with other fields and particles.

Today’s “best of the best” technology can create a few million quantum states per second, says Sergienko. But the farther you try to send them, the more of them will “crack” like broken eggshells—that is, get absorbed into the line and disappear—before they reach their destination. So while some physicists are chasing distance records, dispatching quantum states across hundreds of kilometers, Sergienko is more interested in finding the optimal balance between transmission distance and the rate at which new states can be created. Today, data rates of about 100 kHz are possible within a modest city-sized network. Not exactly telecom speed—typical home broadband connections run 10 or 100 times faster—but good enough to transmit the bits of a robust key that guarantees the highest level of secure communication.

In 2003 and 2004, Sergienko and Gregg Jaeger, an associate professor of natural sciences and mathematics in BU’s College of General Studies, led a BU team that partnered with researchers at Harvard University and BBN Technologies (now a part of Raytheon) to build just such a system. With support from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the military’s advanced research arm, they used standard commercial fiber optic cables in the ground to send photons between three sites in the greater Boston area: one at BU, one at Harvard, and a third at BBN’s headquarters, near Fresh Pond in Cambridge. The system spanned about 18 miles end-to-end. “We showed that this secure communication can be established between three nodes through the metropolitan fiber, and can go 24/7,” says Sergienko. Even though the data rate was not high—just about 1,000 bits per second, slower than a dial-up modem—over time, each site would build up a long enough key to enable secure communication on demand. The system ran for three years, and was followed several years later by similar, independent demonstration networks in Europe, Japan, and China.

What happened next? That’s a government secret. But Sergienko is confident that secure quantum key distribution networks are live today somewhere in the United States. The likeliest spots: Washington, DC, where such a network could enable secure communication between government agencies, eliminating the need for all those trucks; and Wall Street, where it would guarantee absolute privacy for transactions between financial institutions.

Today, Sergienko is trying to narrow the gap between quantum and classical data rates. With fiber quality nearly as good as it can get, and the rate at which new quantum states can be created almost maxed out, Sergienko and his colleagues around the world are taking a new tack: encoding more bits of information in a single photon. While photon polarization can only represent zero or one, a different property of photons, called orbital angular momentum, can encode at least 10 different distinguishable states, and possibly more. Instead of simple binary bits, cryptographers would have a whole mini alphabet to work with.

As for those armored trucks? Though they might still be standard for transporting secret keys to remote locations, Sergienko wouldn’t be surprised if they are no longer pulling up to the Pentagon. But the secrets of the unbreakable code are still just that: secret.

This research is a continuation of work done by Professor Sergienko in 2013, information on which can be found here.

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ECE Research is Critical to DARPA Sponsored “Bio-Foundry” Contact

By Rebecca Jahnke
November 2nd, 2015 in Awards, ECE, Faculty, Grants, News-CE, Recognition, Research, Research-CE.

Densmore’s Contributions Part of a $32 Million DARPA Contract to Cutting Edge Synthetic Biology Effort

By Rebecca Jahnke (COM ’17)

Douglas Densmore

Douglas Densmore, Professor in Boston University Computer Engineering, played a key role in helping MIT’s DARPA Sponsored “Bio-Foundry” Land a $32 million contract.

A $32 million contract from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) was awarded to “The Foundry” (http://web.mit.edu/foundry/), a DNA design and manufacturing facility at the Broad Institute of MIT to support the engineering of novel biological systems. Boston University Computer Engineering Professor Douglas Densmore’s role in automating the facility’s design process with software inspired by electrical and computer engineering was key in establishing novel, large scale, parallel design processes that landed the contract.

The Foundry focuses on designing, testing and fabricating large sequences of genetic information. The intent is to create DNA nucleotide arrangements that can be applied widely for medical, industrial and agricultural purposes.

Engineers at the Foundry work with chains containing millions of nucleotides, all of which are specified using only the letters A, T, G and C. The Foundry sought Densmore’s computer aided design expertise to help automate complex processes because the feat is impossible for an engineer writing out such vast sequences by hand.

Densmore’s contributions will allow the Foundry to significantly increase its output of DNA designs beyond what would have been possible relying on conventional design techniques. The Foundry’s work will lead to greater advances faster – tackling issues like delivering nitrogenous fertilizer to cereal crops and converting compounds that naturally occur in human bacteria into therapeutic drugs.

DNA Graphic

Densmore automated the complex processes by which The Foundry designs, tests and fabricates vast sequences of genetic information.

Douglas Densmore is a Kern Faculty Fellow, Hariri Institute for Computing and Computational Science and Engineering Junior Faculty Fellow, and Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Boston University. He also acts as the director of the Cross-disciplinary Integration of Design Automation Research (CIDAR) group at Boston University, where his team develops computational and experimental tools for synthetic biology. His research facilities include both a computational workspace in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering as well as experimental laboratory space in the Boston University Biological Design Center. Densmore is the President of the Bio-Design Automation Consortium, Nona Research Foundation, and Lattice Automation, Inc.

For more information, please see the Broad Institute of MIT press release.

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Invisible Glass Films to Protect Solar Mirrors and Panels from Dust, Boost Energy Output

By Bhumika Salwan
October 26th, 2015 in ECE, Faculty, News-CE, Research, Research-CE, Students.

U.S. Department of Energy’s SunShot Initiative Awards Boston University in Partnership with Sandia National Laboratories $1.15 million

By Rebecca Jahnke (COM ’17) and Bhumika Salwan (Questrom ’16)

The photo in the upper left hand corner shows the development of a transparent electrodynamic screen (EDS) at a Boston University laboratory.  In the image below, the transparent electrodynamic screens have been installed on solar mirrors at the Sandia National Laboratories.

The photo in the upper left hand corner shows the development of a transparent electrodynamic screen (EDS) at a Boston University laboratory. In the image below, the transparent electrodynamic screens have been installed on solar mirrors at the Sandia National Laboratories.

Boston University has been awarded $1.15 million from the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative to advance self-cleaning solar collector technology and bring the new application to solar fields across the country. With partner Sandia National Laboratories, BU aims to improve high efficiency operations of large solar plants in semi-arid and desert lands. Industrial partners of BU include Corning Inc., Eastman Kodak, Industrial Technology Research Institute (Taiwan) and Geodrill (Chile).

When solar mirrors are first placed in fields, they have very high efficiency rates. However, when dust accumulates on the surface of these solar collectors, their efficiency decreases – the dust obstructs sunlight, thus reducing the amount of energy a solar plant can produce and, in turn, the revenue the plant can generate.

Students and faculty from the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and Questrom School of Business are developing a transparent electrodynamic screen (EDS) film technology that can retrofit solar collectors with a transparent film and protect them from dust. Leading the graduate students are ECE research professor of electrical and computer engineering and materials science and engineering Malay Mazumder, ECE professor of electrical and computer engineering Mark Horenstein and Questrom associate professor of operations and technology management Nitin Joglekar. A team of four graduate and five undergrad students are working on this project at BU.

The team’s developments are especially important given that, in the United States, solar plants are most commonly located in southwestern states with dry and semi-dry climates that have a high dust deposition rate and little rain. Until now, the most common solution has been to clean solar collectors by deluge spray, washing with water and detergent. Under this process, cleaning a 300 MW plant in the southwest would require more than one million gallons of water and cost upwards of $1 million dollars every year in an area already subject to drought. By advancing solar mirrors’ self-cleaning abilities, solar plants could significantly lower their costs.

Through the EDS film technology, voltage pulses would activate the EDS film and allow the electric field to charge dust particles on its surface. Electrodynamic traveling wave motion created by the pulsed phase voltages would then remove the particles. The intent is for the EDS film to activate the film as frequently as needed without requiring water, thus allowing the solar devices to maintain maximum efficiency. By keeping panels clean, heightening operational efficiency and conserving water, the EDS film would have the double effect of driving down solar electricity’s cost and conserving natural resources.

The SunShot Initiative is a collaborative national effort that supports innovation by private companies, universities and national laboratories seeking to make solar energy fully cost-competitive with traditional energy sources before the end of the decade.

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