Category: Recognition

2014 Best ECE Ph.D. Dissertation Award goes to Dr. Jie Meng

July 10th, 2014 in Alumni, Awards, Graduate Programs, Graduate Student Opportunities, Graduate Students, Recognition, Research, Students

By Donald Rock (COM ’17)

On May 17th, Dr. Jie Meng received a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering and was presented with the 2014 Best ECE Ph.D. Dissertation Award. Her dissertation is entitled Modeling and Optimization of High-Performance Many-core Systems for Energy-Efficient and Reliable Computing and focuses on improving the energy efficiency of many-core processors and large-scale computing systems.

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Accomplishing this goal, as Meng’s thesis argues, requires detailed, full-system simulation tools that can simultaneously evaluate power, performance, and temperature. Her award-winning thesis includes the design of such simulation methods and leveraging these methods for the development of dynamic optimization policies for computing systems.

This prestigious award is just one of a number of awards that the ambitious engineer has received throughout her Ph.D. career. In 2012, Dr. Meng won the Best Paper Award at the High Performance Extreme Computing Conference; in 2011 she won the A. Richard Newton Graduate Scholarship Award with her advisor, Assistant Professor Ayse Coskun (ECE), at the Design Automation Conference; and in 2010 she received the Google Scholarship at the Google GRAD CS Forum. Furthermore, Dr. Meng has won a number of awards from Boston University, including the Outstanding Graduate Teaching Fellow in the School of Engineering and the 2009 ECE Graduate Teaching Fellow of the Year Award.

Professor Ayse Coskun (left) and Dr. Jie Ming (right) at the 2014 College of Engineering Ph.D. Commencement Ceremony (Photo provided by Professor Ayse Coskun).

Professor Ayse Coskun (left) and Dr. Jie Ming (right) at the 2014 College of Engineering Ph.D. Commencement Ceremony (Photo provided by Professor Ayse Coskun).

Dr. Meng started her academic career at the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC), where she earned a Bachelor of Engineering Degree in Electrical Engineering in 2004. She went on to earn a Master of Applied Science in Electrical and Computer Engineering at McMaster University before coming to Boston University in 2008 to pursue her Ph.D.

Dr. Meng simultaneously pursued career advancement while maintaining her academic workload. She landed an internship at the Intel Corporation, and another at Sandia National Laboratories.

Currently, Dr. Meng works as a software engineer at CGG, a French-based geophysical services company. “To be specific, I am working on developing software modules for modeling and imaging geological structures in the exploration [of] seismic field,” Meng clarified in an email correspondence.

When Dr. Meng reflects back on her time at BU, she remembers, “I was very lucky and grateful to have Professor Ayse Coskun as my advisor. [She was] a role model for me.” Professor Coskun felt similarly, noting, “Jie is a very hard-working researcher and she has the necessary perseverance to succeed. Seeing Jie graduate successfully as my first Ph.D. student and continue to her career has been among the most satisfying accomplishments of my time at BU.”

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Bellotti Receives Two Grants for Engineering Advancements

July 8th, 2014 in Awards, Faculty, Grants, News-CE, Recognition, Research, Research-CE

Professor Bellotti Receives Two New Grants to Develop Vertical Power Electronic Devices and Heterogeneous Computer Architectures

Bellotti’s work will benefit a number of industries including railroad transportation and electrical power distribution. The switch concept is expected to improve utility pole efficiency and reduce developmental costs of electric trains. Image provided by Photobucket (GreenThoughts), and Sidewalkbranding.net.

Bellotti’s work will benefit a number of industries including railroad transportation and electrical power distribution. The switch concept is expected to improve utility pole efficiency and reduce developmental costs of electric trains. The left image provided by Photobucket (GreenThoughts); and right image provided by Sidewalkbranding.net.

The Computational Electronics Group led by Professor Enrico Bellotti (ECE, MSE) has been awarded funding for two new programs to study novel power electronic devices based on III-Nitride semiconductors and to develop and evaluate heterogeneous computer architectures to simulate advanced materials and devices.

The new grant from the National Science Foundation will provide Prof. Bellotti with $336,000 over a period of three years to establish the theoretical foundation of vertical power switches based on III-Nitride semiconductors. If successfully developed, the power switches proposed in this program may lead to a number of breakthroughs in the areas of energy conversion that may profoundly change how and to what extent energy is consumed by society. First of all, these devices will aid in the implementation of the smart grid concept, delivering an unprecedented quality of service to the utilities’ customers while reducing transmission losses and increasing the capacity of these systems for wind and solar sources. In the area of transportation systems, they will enable the cost and size effective design of electric drives, not only for cars, but also for large vehicles, such as trucks or buses with immediate environmental benefits. They will reduce the development cost of electric trains, reducing the size of the motor control systems, leading to a further expansion and upgrade of local and regional railway systems.

The Army Research Office (ARO), through a DURIP Award, will provide the Computational Electronics Group with the resources totaling $150,000 to develop a heterogeneous computational hardware platform composed of distributed and shared memory systems integrated with GPUs to evaluate novel simulation methodologies for the design of electronic and optoelectronic materials and devices. Exploiting heterogeneous computing platform may significantly increase the ability of material scientists to predict novel material properties and possibly design new ones with specific properties.

For further information contact Prof. E. Bellotti at bellotti@bu.edu

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Sophomores Win 1st Prize at #HackBostonStrong

June 17th, 2014 in Awards, Events, News-CE, Recognition, Students, Undergraduate Students

Hacking for a Good Cause

By Gabriella McNevin and Donald Rock (COM ’17)

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A year after the tragic Boston Marathon Bombings, a group of engineers and computer scientists wanted to commemorate the tragedy. To help the community, mobile application development firm Intrepid Pursuits organized HackBostonStrong, an event took place to encourage technological advancements to solve marathon-related issues. In an event announcement, Intrepid Pursuits said, “Armed with years of Boston Marathon running data, we’re calling all designers, developers and tech-minded folks to produce the best marathon-related tool.” The event was to take place on Friday, April 18th.

A member of the winning team, working hard through the night.

Winston Chen (ECE ’16) working hard through the night.

On Saturday, April 19th, 3 BU students and a UMass Lowell student were named the winners of HackBostonStrong. Winston Chen (ECE ’16), Dean Shi (ECE ’16), Huy Le (CAS ‘16), and Corey Prak (UMass Lowell ’15) joined the ranks of industry professionals and student-hackers to show their support for the city. The team was one of the few groups that worked through the night to take advantage of the 26.2 hours allotted to each team.

The team worked at Intrepid Pursuits’ design space in Cambridge, MA, which was open to all 6 teams who participated in the event. The organizers kept participants fed and hydrated with meals and snacks throughout the night. Participants brought their own toothbrushes and laptops for “all-night productivity.”

 

The Echo Can prototype. The photo shows the bottom/landing platform of the trash receptacle. The microphone is the black device in the center of the platform.

The Echo Can prototype. The photo shows the bottom/landing platform of the trash receptacle. The microphone is the black device in the center of the platform.

The students worked diligently. Team member Huy Le recalls getting the most sleep of anyone in the group with 5.5 hours. Winston slept 3 hours, Corey slept around 5 hours, and Dean gave into 1 hour of sleep.

Their hard work paid off. The team developed the “Echo Can,” which is a device that could change the way people think about recycling. It is a green bin that sorts recyclable waste from unrecyclable. It tracks the audio signals of an object being dropped into the trashcan. A microphone, placed inside the can, discerns the analog signal, which is later translated into a digital format.

Team members worked together to blend their unique skills. Le and Prak used an open source program to see graphs of the frequencies of the sound waves detected from the platform and were able to find reasonable thresholds to distinguish between recyclable and waste material. Chen and Shi used their ECE skillset to develop the electrical engineering circuits with tools they had learned in Electric Circuit Theory (EK307). The pair also recalled lessons from Intro to Software Engineering (EC327) to apply C-language software programming.

The team was equipped with the few supplies allowed by a college student’s budget. They arrived with supply kits from Chen and Shi’s EK307 course, some resistors, servos they borrowed from BU’s hackerspace, and transistors they purchased at RadioShack. Other than those materials, everything else used were items one would be able to find in a dorm room – batteries, a bin, some cardboard, and tape. As Le explained, “not having the best material and supplies was a real issue.”

The team felt the Echo Can would be more beneficial to the community than any of the marathon-related tools they had conjured. The fine print in the competition rules revealed “if running’s not your jam, you could honor Boston by creating a more general product or prototype that benefits Boston and its citizens as a whole.”

In the end, the underdogs won. They were so surprised to win that Chen joked, “When I first heard them say Echo Can as the grand prize winner, I thought to myself, ‘Who is Echo Can?’”

This image shows the bottom view of the microphone and landing platform. The sound trash makes when dropping onto the platform is recorded. The sound, or analog signal, is then translated into a digital format.

This image shows the bottom view of the microphone and landing platform. The sound trash makes when dropping onto the platform is recorded. The sound, or analog signal, is then translated into a digital format.

Andrea Garvey of Intrepid Pursuits noted that the judges were impressed by Echo Can because it was “an elegant solution to a common problem.” Contests were judged on four criteria: innovation, design, impact, and execution. They were expected to create a practical design that would solve a real problem in a feasible way and could impact a lot of people. Le believes his team was different from his impressive competitors because the team “fulfilled the criteria in an interesting way.” Echo Can addresses a common aversion to recycling and offers a solution that is convenient to potential users.

This win may be the first highlight for the young hackers’ recycling initiative. In addition to their $2,000 prize for winning, Intrepid Pursuits put the team in touch with BigBelly Solar, the company that created the sustainability solar cans found on BU’s campus, to help the students going forward. The team feels that their current design is not ready for a business venture and they look forward to continuing to work on the project without the time and resource restrictions. Le remarked, “an imperfect product doesn’t fulfill our vision.” He continued, “our plan is to improve, perfect, and innovate a polished Echo Can for practical use for the fall, and hopefully, we have something that fits the original goal and vision our team had.”

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ECE Seniors Share an Intention to Improve Societal Issues by Improving Technology

June 12th, 2014 in Alumni, Awards, Courses, Events, Recognition, Senior Design, Undergraduate Students, Video

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 ECE Day 2014

Senior Capstone Design and Honors Thesis students in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) spent May 5, 2014 showcasing projects that represented the culmination of their education at Boston University.

Each presentation accomplished more than just entertain the audience; it earned its creators their due respect. Topics covered technology like a 3D printer scanner, a remote controlled helicopter, and a Mario Kart video game.

During team 6’s presentation, “Danger Zone” by Kenny Loggins blared through the speakers. The big screen streamed a video of a search and rescue remote controlled car, which the team programmed to patrol a fire hazard site for survivors. (Click the controller to listen to “Danger Zone”).

Earlier in the day, the team that created EPIC/ EpiPen Calls concluded their presentation with a spirited Q&A. A number of people –including team members, the client that requested technological support, and a panel of judges– raised their voice to speak about the real-world application and potential of the invention.

Photo by Chitose Suzuki for Boston University Photography © 2010 Boston University all rights reserved.

Photo by Chitose Suzuki for Boston University Photography © 2010 Boston University all rights reserved.

The commercial application that teams intend for their projects were as diverse as the equipment they used. The purpose of the designs ranged from assisting the visually impaired, to improving search and rescue missions, to generating alternative energy harvesting methods.

A panel of ECE alumni judges watched each presentation and asked questions to pick a winner for five of the ECE Day Awards. The judges were well prepared to make the call because each had once walked in the students’ shoes and all are currently executing the engineering skills that they realized during their Senior Capstone Design Course. ECE graduates Peter Galvin, Mikhail Gurevich, Craig Laboda, Ryan Lagoy, George Matthews, Drew Morris, Bradley Rufleth, Dan Ryan and Stephen Snyder served as the 2014 judges. Each missed work –at companies such as General Electric, Microsoft, ByteLite, and Btiometry– to share insight with the graduating class of 2014, and decide the most impressive project.

“Wow,” muttered an impressed audience member after the AutoScan team calmly countered questions posed by judges on the technical depth of the team’s invention. The team’s pothole detection system demonstrated the technical skill that is only achievable by a team of well-matched individuals with different specialties.

The dynamic skill sets within each team is key in assembling the ECE Senior Capstone Design Project teams. Associate Professor of the Practice Alan Pisano (ECE) coordinated 20 well-rounded teams by measuring individual strengths. For example, he placed students that gravitate towards user interface development with those who lean towards sensor analytics or java script programming.

Photo by Chitose Suzuki for Boston University Photography © 2010 Boston University all rights reserved.

Photo by Chitose Suzuki for Boston University Photography © 2010 Boston University all rights reserved.

The team members that created AutoScan contributed either their hardware or software know-how to develop the project that won Best ECE Senior Design Project Award, 2014. The team was also nominated to show a poster of their project at the national Capstone Design Conference in Columbus, Ohio. The mission of the Capstone Design Conference in Columbus is to improve design-based courses around the country. On June 2nd, Professor Pisano and team members Vinny DeGenova, Stuart Minshull, Nandheesh Prasad, Austen Schmidt, and Charlie Vincent flew to Ohio for the two-day event. Professor Pisano led a workshop on assembling strong design teams.

A significant feature of the Senior Design Capstone project is the team client. Each team is paired with a client. The client (who is either a professor or actively working) requests software and/or hardware for a particular problem that will improve a societal issue.

Photo by Chitose Suzuki for Boston University Photography © 2010 Boston University all rights reserved.

Photo by Chitose Suzuki for Boston University Photography © 2010 Boston University all rights reserved.

The principle of a school in Boston that specializes in mentally and physically disabled student academics posed a task for one ECE senior design team. Carter School Principal Marianne Kopaczynski requested a learning tool that would impart fundamental communication and cognitive skills to students. The students created a user-friendly devise called the Automated Announcement System that generates announcements based on each student’s location. Principle Kopaczynski plans to install the system in the school to support location-based feedback learning.

ECE Day Award Winners

Best ECE Senior Design Project Award AutoScan
Entrepreneurial Award Cloud 3D Scanner
Design Excellence Award Cement Impedance Analyzer
Design Excellence Award dDOSI Spectrum Analysis Unit (dSAU)
Michael F. Ruane Award for Excellence in Senior Capstone Design Samuel Howes
Senior Honors Thesis Award Julie Frish, “Development of Low Loss Waveguides for Mid-Infrared Integrated Photonic Circuits”
Center for Space Physics Undergraduate Research Award Andrew Kelley
Teacher of the Year Ajay Joshi
Graduate Teaching Fellow of the Year/Teaching Assistant of the Year Lake Bu

Congratulations, Class of 2014!
Photo by Chitose Suzuki for Boston University Photography © 2010 Boston University all rights reserved.

Photo by Chitose Suzuki for Boston University Photography © 2010 Boston University all rights reserved.

 

By Gabriella McNevin

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Andrew Kelley Wins The Center for Space Physics Undergraduate Research Award

May 19th, 2014 in Alumni, Awards, Events, Recognition, Research, Senior Design, Students, Undergraduate Programs, Undergraduate Student Opportunities, Undergraduate Students, Video

Kelley found his passion while working with the BU Satellite Program & Rocket Group

By Gabriella McNevin

On May 5, 2014, Andrew Kelley (middle) received The Center for Space Physics Undergraduate Research Award at the senior capstone event, ECE Day. Standing to Kelley's left is Associate Professor Semeter, and to Kelley's right is ECE Department Chair Professor David Castañón. Photo by Chitose Suzuki  for Boston University Photography.

From left to right: Associate Professor Semeter, Andrew Kelley (ENG ’14), and ECE Department Chair Professor David Castañón. Photo by Chitose Suzuki for Boston University Photography.

Andrew Kelley (ENG ’14) won The Center for Space Physics Undergraduate Research Award for his contribution to the BU Satellite Program and the Boston University Rocket Propulsion Group. The award recipient was decided by the Director of the BU Center of Space Physics, Professor John Clarke (AS); and Associate Director of the BU Center for Space Physics, Professor Joshua Semeter (ECE).

Kelley’s success was achieved in a relatively short period of time. Kelley entered BU excited to gain a versatile education in computer engineering in an accelerated 3-year program. For his first two years, like many, Kelley was unsure of his passion and did not know what career would best unite his academic skills and interests. He explored the possibilities by researching extracurricular activities that involved computer engineering. Ultimately, Kelley joined his first space program venture after his freshman year, and realized his passion in the field after his second year. It was not until his third and final year at Boston University, that Kelley dove, head-first, into space programs.

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Andrew Kelley showing off one of the BU Rocket Propulsion Group’s model rockets in Amesbury, MA.

A future that blended computer engineering and space programs was first proposed to Kelley at Splash Day his freshmen year. Splash Day is an annual fair that features student organizations. Kelley recalls noticing a ten-foot model rocket hoisted on the shoulders of two students laughing and jogging to the opposite side of the field. He thought to himself, “follow those footsteps!” The name of the student organization in charge of that rocket, now known as the BU Rocket Propulsion Group, was painted on the side.

Before joining a team, Kelley weighed his enthusiasm about the BU Rocket Propulsion Group with his interest in other groups, and his collegiate goals. He spent the remaining year developing relationships with organization members, contemplating rocketry, and discovering how to best manage his time.

At the end of the academic year, Kelley and a member of the Rocket Propulsion Group were chatting about the organization. Kelley’s friend expressed some concern about the group’s leadership. The group insider mentioned that the vice president was expected to graduate with no prospect of a predecessor. Instinctively Kelley responded, “I will do it.”

Two years later, Kelley recalls those four words as the best he ever said. Joining the group helped Kelley to realize his passion for space programs, and introduced him to a network of some of his most trusted advisors, including Professor Semeter and Principal Fellow at Raytheon Missile Systems Joe Sebeny.

Towards the end of his second year at BU, Kelley was at a crossroad. He needed a summer job, and had been denied internships at Google and Microsoft. Uninterested in returning to his home in Texas, Kelley took the advice of Professor Semeter and applied to work at Boston University Student Satellite for Applications and Training program, specifically ANDESITE. It was a pivotal time for the satellite program, as it had recently been awarded an Air Force Research Laboratory grant and joined a national competition to win the opportunity to launch a satellite to orbit. As one of the newest members to the satellite program, the Texan embraced the organization’s mission to design, fabricate, and operate a low-earth-orbiting satellite.

ECE Day

Kelley stands ready to present a poster on his honors thesis research topic at ECE Day. Photo by Chitose Suzuki for Boston University Photography.

In September 2013, the beginning of Kelley’s final year at BU, his extracurricular and academic interests melted into one. Kelley opted to complete his academic capstone requirements by completing an honors thesis, rather than a senior design project. His theses work, entitled “Design and Implementation of a 3-DOF Rocket Autopilot,” advanced both the BU Student Satellite and supported the BU Rocket Propulsion Group.

“Design and Implementation of a 3-DOF Rocket Autopilot” provided an analysis and design investigation of rocket trajectory systems to develop a functioning autopilot. Without trajectory control, a rocket would run the risk of becoming a missile.

After graduation, Kelley will spend a week with his family in Fort Worth, Texas before jet-setting to Los Angles, California to be a Space X intern.  Kelley will be involved in vehicle and systems integration for the Dragon capsule.

Boston University Rocket Propulsion Group Watch the group’s second hot fire test:

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EE Seniors Win GizmoSphere Contest

April 2nd, 2014 in Awards, News-CE, Recognition, Senior Design, Students, Undergraduate Students

Projects Automates Pothole Detection and Management
By Mark Dwortzan

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The AutoScan senior design team consists of Austen Schmidt (systems integration), Nandheesh Prasad (power engineering), Charlie Vincent (networking and GPS),Vinny DeGenova (image processing) and Stuart Minshull (Web application).

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The AutoScan prototype consists of a Gizmo board, depth sensing camera, system battery and other components. The system is designed to be mounted under the front bumper of a city vehicle and scan the road for potholes.

The impact of a  long and stormy winter continues to be felt on the roads. According to the Boston Globe, this year the City of Boston has already filled more than 8,800 potholes, primarily reported by drivers, including one in Cleveland Circle that sent a man to the hospital. Taking a more proactive approach could prevent vehicular damage, injuries and claims against the city while saving time and money for all concerned.

Now a vehicle mounted pothole detection system developed by Electrical Engineering seniors as part of their senior design project aims to do just that. Instead of relying on citizens to report potholes or paying crews to look for them, the system, known as AutoScan, could enable city vehicles to detect them automatically as they go about their daily routes. Coupled with tracking and scheduling software and incorporating a low-cost, embedded technology development platform called a Gizmo board, the system could provide a comprehensive and economical road repair solution.

Reviewers at GizmoSphere, which makes the Gizmo board, agree. Dazzled by a $1,000 prototype of AutoScan, they awarded the team first prize in a video contest.

“The low cost, achieved through the extensive use of open source solutions, made it compelling to the Gizmo community,” said Scott Hoot, president of GizmoSphere. “But the idea of how seamlessly this idea fit into the Internet of Things, made the BU project a winner. Clearly this is a project that takes close to real-time measurements in the physical world, and utilizes those measurements through the open standards available in the Internet.”

The AutoScan senior design team consists of Austen Schmidt (systems integration), Vinny DeGenova (image processing), Nandheesh Prasad (power engineering), Charlie Vincent (networking and GPS) and Stuart Minshull (Web application). The EE seniors developed their prototype under the supervision of ECE Adjunct Professor Babak Kia, who often assumed the role of prospective customer.

While there are several solutions available that can quickly measure potholes on a mobile platform, ranging from lasers to accelerometers, the EE team focused on a “time-of-flight” infrared camera that determines distance between the camera and various points in its field of view.

“Our system is basically an onboard computer that mounts to the bottom of a city vehicle, such as a bus,” said Schmidt. “As the bus goes along, it uses the infrared camera to scan the road for potholes and computes their depth, and sends the data collected on each pothole—volume, GPS coordinates, time and date—over a cellular network to a database hosted by a website. The website interprets data coming in from multiple scanners, displays it on a Google map and updates a Web-accessible road repair schedule.”

Exploiting the Gizmo board and open source software, the team has advanced a prototype of a system that promises to cost a few thousand dollars, far cheaper than alternatives that can range from $10,000 to $100,000. The only sacrifice is a bit of accuracy.

“Our system is a little less accurate than our competitors, because they focus on applications where you really need high-fidelity detection, such as airport tarmacs or bridges,” said Minshull. “We wanted a cheaper way for potholes to be detected without having to worry about tracking millimeter-line cracks in the road.”

To put AutoScan to the test, the team used cardboard boxes to create an elevated road surface with cutouts of different volumes representing potholes. Tests showed that the system accurately measured the volume of each cutout and successfully relayed collected data to the website. Next steps include conducting high-speed tests beyond the lab environment, and finding a way to protect the unit against vibration and adverse weather conditions.

Self-Cleaning System Boosts Efficiency of Solar Panels

March 24th, 2014 in Faculty, Grants, Recognition, Research

ENG team has a creative solution to a costly problem

By Leslie Friday (Video by Joe Chan), BU Today

Within seconds, the transparent EDS sweeps away at least 90 percent of dust and sand atop a solar panel. Photo by Jackie Ricciardi

Within seconds, the transparent EDS sweeps away at least 90 percent of dust and sand atop a solar panel. Photo by Jackie Ricciardi

The energy from the sun that hits the Earth in a single hour could power the planet for an entire year, according to the US Department of Energy (DOE). One of the best places to harness that free, abundant, and environmentally friendly energy is a desert, but deserts, it turns out, come with a nemesis to solar panels: sand. The particulate matter that constantly blows across deserts settles on solar panels, decreasing their efficiency by nearly 100 percent in the middle of a dust storm. The current solution is for solar field operators to spray the dust with desalinated, distilled water.

“That might not sound like a big deal, but if you have millions of square feet of solar panels out in a desert, it ends up being costly—especially if water is a scarce resource,” says John Noah Hudelson (ENG’14), one of several graduate students working to find a better solution with Malay Mazumder, a College of Engineering research professor of electrical and computer engineering and of materials science and engineering, and Mark Horenstein, an ENG professor of electrical and computer engineering. “We’re looking to use just a small amount of electricity to statically push the dust off the surface of the solar panel or the solar mirror.”

The BU team’s answer, called a transparent electrodynamic system (EDS), is a self-cleaning technology that can

Stark (left) and Hudelson taking a specular reflection reading last year on mirrors they installed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, N.M. Photo courtesy of Jeremy Stark

Stark (left) and Hudelson taking a specular reflection reading last year on mirrors they installed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, N.M. Photo courtesy of Jeremy Stark

be embedded in the solar device or silkscreen-printed onto a transparent film adhered to the solar panel or mirror. The EDS exposes the dust particles to an electrostatic field, which causes them to levitate, dipping and rising in alternating waves (the way a beach ball bounces along the upturned hands of fans in a packed stadium) as the electric charge fluctuates.

The entire process takes seconds and uses a minuscule amount of power, generated by the solar device itself—about 1/100th of what it produces daily. In its final version, the EDS will be programmable or will automatically detect the presence of surface dust and switch on. “There’s nothing like this on the market,” Horenstein says.

The inspiration for the EDS came to Mazumder more than a decade ago from an unlikely source: human lungs. He remembers thinking that the organs, outfitted with self-cleaning hairs that sweep dust up and out of the respiratory system, were “ingenious defense mechanisms.” He thought he could mimic that tidy biological system and apply it to other mechanisms.

In 2003, NASA, whose scientists thought the technology could be used on future Mars missions to keep equipment free of cosmic dust, gave him a three-year, $750,000 grant. When that funding expired, a $50,000 Ignition Award from BU’s Office of Technology Development kept Mazumder’s research afloat while he searched for alternative funding. His big break came in 2010, when he gave a presentation on the EDS at an American Chemical Society conference in Boston. News of the technology spread through articles in such publications as the New York Times and the Britain’s Daily Telegraph.

Mazumder received a call from David Powell, a research and development manager at Abengoa Solar, a global pioneer in the construction of CSP (concentrated solar power) and PV (photovoltaic) power plants. The company operates the Solana Generating Station in Gila Bend, Ariz., and the soon-to-open Mojave Solar Project near Barstow, Calif. Each has the capacity to produce 280 megawatts—or the ability to power more than 100,000 homes. With at least two plants in desert locations, Abengoa was keenly interested in the success of the EDS and eager to test Mazumder’s prototypes.

In 2012, Mazumder and Abengoa landed a two-year, $945,000 grant from the DOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy to further test and expand the capacity of the EDS. Horenstein and Nitin Joglekar, a School of Management associate professor of operations and technology management, are co–principal investigators of the grant, and Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, N.M., signed on to help evaluate the prototype’s efficiency and develop larger-scale models. With a $40,000 grant from the Mass Clean Energy Council, the team’s total funding rose to nearly $1 million.

For two months last year, Hudelson and doctoral candidate Jeremy Stark (ENG’14) tested nearly 20 EDS prototypes at the Abengoa and Sandia sites before rain and snow cut their work short. They found that the system performed as expected, removing at least 90 percent of dust particles from solar panel surfaces. Next, the BU team must figure out how to protect the EDS from Mother Nature and to upscale to industrial-sized models.

Mazumder estimates that the United States would need to produce one terawatt (one trillion watts) of solar power to meet household and industry demand. That kind of output is a distant goal, but he sees great potential in getting started by building solar plants in the Southwest—specifically the Mojave Desert. The arid region has an elevation of nearly 5,000 feet, receives regular sun, and has fewer dust storms than other desert regions.

“The Mojave Desert and the Southwest, if fully utilized and assuming the existence of a reliable distribution system,” he says, “could provide most of the US demand with respect to our energy needs.”

Mazumder will submit a proposal soon to the DOE for renewed funding, but he must first identify a manufacturing partner willing to produce industry-scale panels equipped with EDS technology. Once that goal is reached, he thinks, the self-cleaning system could hit the market after two years.

“We must proceed fast,” he says. “The need is there.”

See video.

Klamkin Earns IEEE Senior Membership

March 7th, 2014 in Awards, Faculty, News-CE, News-EP, News-ISS, Recognition

Professor Jonathan Klamkin (ECE, MSE)

Professor Jonathan Klamkin (ECE, MSE)

Professor Klamkin (ECE, MSE) was elevated to the grade of IEEE Senior member, which are bestowed on those who have made significant contributions to the profession.

As a Senior Member, Klamkin has the ability to hold executive IEEE positions and serve as a reference for other applicants for senior membership. In order to eligible to be nominated or apply one must have shown significant performance in at least five years in professional practice.

Klamkin’s research is focused on integrated photonic technologies for optical communications, microwave photonics, and sensing. “The photonic devices and integrated circuits that we develop in the Integrated Photonics Group increase the capacity of fiber-optic networks, enable more efficient communication between and inside data centers, and could revolutionize space communications.”

He felt honored to be recognized as Senior Member of the IEEE. “The IEEE is one of the most recognized professional associations and produces publications and technology standards that strongly influence the field in which I am active.”

Since March 2013, Klamkin has been an Assistant Professor at Boston University. He then received Boston University College of Engineering Dean’s Catalyst Award. Some of his research interests include: integrated photonics, compound semiconductors, and microwave photonics.

- Chelsea Hermond (SMG ’15)

Nominations Open for 2014-2015 Junior Faculty Fellows

February 21st, 2014 in Awards, Faculty, News-CE, News-EP, News-ISS, Recognition

peopleThe Rafik B. Hariri Institute for Computing and Computational Science & Engineering is now accepting nominations for the 2014/2015 class of Junior Faculty Fellows (see the 2011/2012 cohort, the 2012/2013 cohort, and the 2013/2014 cohort).

The Hariri Institute Junior Faculty Fellows program was established both to recognize outstanding junior faculty at Boston University working in diverse areas of the computational sciences, as well as to provide focal points for supporting broader collaborative research in these areas at BU and beyond. Junior Fellows are selected by the Hariri Institute Executive Steering Committee based on nominations received each spring and are appointed for a two-year term.

Nominations can be submitted through the Hariri Institute web site by selecting “Junior Fellow Nomination” from the “Forms” menu at the top of the page.

Who May Submit Nominations: Nominations may be submitted by any BU faculty member.

Eligibility: Tenure-track assistant professors in their second or third year at BU are eligible.

Deadline: The nomination deadline is Friday, April 4, 2014.

Nomination Materials: The nomination form requires the following information (check the nomination form for details):

  • Contact information for the faculty member making the nomination and for the nominee.
  • Nomination letter submitted as a single PDF file that highlights how the candidate might contribute to and benefit from participation in the HIC Junior Faculty Fellows Program.
  • Full curriculum vitae for the nominee, summarizing academic preparation and appointments, honors and awards, and at most 10 most relevant publications.
  • (Optionally) Any supporting materials that may be relevant the evaluation of the nominee, submitted as a single PDF file.
  • Selecting an Institute lab and cluster of interest to the nominee.

Additional Information: If you have any questions about the program or the nomination process, please contact Linda Grosser, Director of Program & Project Development at the Hariri Institute, by email at lgrosser@bu.edu.

Atlas Changing the Workout Experience

February 18th, 2014 in Alumni, Graduate Students, News-CE, News-EP, News-ISS, Recognition, Research, Research-CE, Senior Design, Students, Undergraduate Students

Mike Kasparian (ECE ’12, MS ’13)

As many of us try to stick to our New Year’s resolution of going to the gym more, we often find ourselves looking toward apps and equipment that can help us keep track of our progress.

Jawbone and Nike Fuel Band are just some of the wearable products on the market that allow you to keep track of this data, but what if these devices could be more customizable?

2013-8-9_Michael

Mike Kasparian (ECE ’12, MS ’13)

That’s the idea behind Atlas, the company founded by Mike Kasparian (ECE ’12, MS ’13) and his preschool friend, Peter Li.

Atlas tracks and identifies exercises, counts reps, calculates burned calories, and evaluates form. It also displays workouts live and is compatible with many popular fitness apps such as MapMyFitness.

Said Kasparian: “It’s one thing to come up with a great idea that will disrupt a technology, but it’s another thing to formulate the idea into a business and develop it into something that will one day not only generate revenue but also be in the hands of consumers.”

Li initially came up with the idea and contacted Kasparian to help with the hardware. Techstars, a startup accelerator in Austin, provided them office space, funding, and mentorship.

It was not an easy decision for Kasparian, who had a stable position at Philips Healthcare, to leave his day job. However, he took the risk and now holds the position of Chief Technology Officer (CTO) of the growing company.

The company gained funding through a campaign on indiegogo, a web platform that helps people raise money for new ideas and products. Atlas has surpassed its $125,000 fundraising goal, collecting over $450K.

Even though there is a lot of uncertainty associated with this venture, Kasparian feels that providing people with a personalized workout experience outweighs the risk.

Kasparian, who studied Electrical Engineering at Boston University, attributes the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering’s senior design course as having a significant impact on his career. He said, “It was really the first time I was able to fully apply all of the technical skills from my coursework toward a legitimate project.”

As his advisor, Professor Bakak Kia gave Kasparian invaluable help and guidance during senior design. Kia is very proud of Mike, saying, “To reach this level, where he is competing with some of the most innovative companies in this field, speaks volumes about Mike’s vision, ability, and the value of the education he has received at BU.”

While working on the project, MINSensory, for senior design, Kasparian said he learned the importance of both collaboration and taking feedback. He did both well, too, winning the top team prize, the P. T. Hsu Memorial Award for Outstanding Senior Design Project, and an individual honor, the Michael F. Ruane Award for Excellence in Senior Capstone Design.

Later, his M.S. research project involved designing the hardware platform that would be used in the Atlas wristband. Professor Ajay Joshi (ECE) was Kasparian’s academic and research advisor, and he advised him during the platform design process. Joshi believes “the fitness band market is just picking up” and said he hopes “the Atlas wristband becomes the preferred choice of most fitness enthusiasts.”

Kasparian continues to remain close to the department, serving as one of the judges for senior design last year and graduating with his M.S. in December.

- Chelsea Hermond (SMG ’15)