Category: Events

The Nation’s Top Engineers Visit BU ECE

January 25th, 2016 in ECE, Events, Faculty, Lectures, News-CE, News-EP, News-IDS, Recognition, Research, Uncategorized

Leading Engineers Visit BU as Part of the ECE Distinguished Lecture Series to Discuss Research with Students and Faculty 

By Rebecca Jahnke, COM ’17

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ECE Fall 2015 Distinguished Lecturers Daniel Fleetwood (9/20/2015), Kevin Skadron (10/14/2015), and Ralph Etienne-Cummings (12/2/2015).

BU’s Electrical & Computer Engineering department draws renowned leaders of the field to present as part of the ECE Distinguished Lecture Series. The topics presented are always changing, but consistently span diverse research areas. The Fall 2015 lineup included academics Daniel Fleetwood, Kevin Skadron and Ralph Etienne-Cummings.

Despite Fleetwood, Skadron and Etienne-Cummings’ varying research focuses, the trio has much in common. All are highly decorated IEEE Fellows with many accolades to their names. They hold a collective ten patents between them. Through the groundbreaking publications they’ve authored, the group has effectively written the science today’s students are learning. Work conducted at posts throughout the country – and for some, on sabbatical abroad – further reflects the breadth of their influence.

Fleetwood kicked off this season’s series with a lecture entitled “Moore’s Law and Radiation Effects on Microelectronics” in September. Fleetwood is the Chair of Vanderbilt University’s Department of Electrical Engineering & Computer Science as well as the university’s Olin H. Landreth Professor of Engineering. His lecture examining the effects of Moore’s Law Size and voltage scaling followed his research in nano science and technology as well as risk and reliability. A Fellow of the American Physical Society and an IEEE Fellow, Fleetwood also received the IEEE Nuclear and Plasma Sciences Society’s Merit Award. Having authored over 380 publications, Fleetwood received ten Outstanding Paper Awards and has his research cited upwards of 7000 times.

The series continued with a lecture by Kevin Skadron, University of Virginia Department of Computer Science Chair and Harry Douglas Forsyth Professor. His October presentation, “Automata Processing: Massively-Parallel Acceleration for Approximate Pattern Matching,” provided an overview of the AP architecture and observations from accelerating its applications. Skadron cites his research as exploring processor design techniques for managing power, thermal and reliability constraints, all with a focus on manycore and heterogeneous architectures. He has achieved two patents of his own and over 100 peer-reviewed publications and counting since his college summers spent interning for Microsoft and Intel.

Ralph Etienne-Cummings, Professor and Chair of Johns Hopkins University’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, closed out this semester’s series in December. This final presentation – “I, Robot: Blurring the lines between Mind, Body and Robotics” – suggested new approaches to brain-machine interfaces (BMI). Etienne-Cummings’ research interests include systems and algorithms for biologically inspired and low-power processing, biomorphic robots, applied neuroscience, neutral prosthetics and computer integrated surgical systems and technologies. His high level of curiosity has been evident since he was a child and repaired his own short wave radio to listen to a soccer match. Now the holder of seven patents, Etienne-Cummings is known to make time for diversity and mentoring initiatives intended to awaken a similar curiosity in others.

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ECE and ME Seniors Bring 2015 National SpaceVision Conference to BU

November 23rd, 2015 in Awards, ECE, Events, Faculty, Publications, Recognition, Research, Research-CE, Students, Uncategorized, Undergraduate Programs, Undergraduate Student Opportunities

By Rebecca Jahnke (COM ‘17) and Bhumika Salwan (Questrom ’16)

BU Engineering seniors Mehmet Akbulut (ME ‘16) and Dean De Carli (EE ‘16) served as the SEDS SpaceVision 2015 Chair of Operations and Chair of Programming. Photo by Bhumika Salwan (Questrom ’16).

BU Engineering seniors Dean De Carli (EE ‘16) and Mehmet Akbulut (ME ’16) served as the SEDS SpaceVision 2015 Chair of Programming and Chair of Operations. Photo by Bhumika Salwan (Questrom ’16).

 Boston University hosted over 300 attendees November 12-15th at the Metcalf Trustee Center for the Students for the Exploration and Development of Space (SEDS) SpaceVision 2015 Conference. The  conference is entirely student-run and space-centric. It bills itself as connecting present with future space leaders and is part of international nonprofit SEDS’ larger mission to empower students through the high school, undergraduate and graduate levels to impact space exploration.

BU Engineering seniors Mehmet Akbulut (ME ‘16) and Dean De Carli (EE ‘16) spearheaded conference planning. Both Akbulut and De Carli, who served as the Chair of Operations and Chair of Programming, respectively, had attended the 2013 Arizona SpaceVision Conference. After pondering why the conference had yet to be hosted in a major city like Boston, the pair submitted a bid to post the conference at Boston University and successfully secured the 2015 venue nomination.

Akbulut oversaw logistics, registration, personnel, and general operations of the event while De Carli took charge of programming and speakers. Together, they developed an agenda that featured industry speakers, panels, a business plan competition, and a first-ever peer mentor session. By bringing students together with leaders in the aerospace community, the conference offered attendees invaluable networking opportunities and the chance to view the future of space development through an interdisciplinary lens.

The SEDS,  SpaceVision, Rocket Propulsion, and small satellite efforts at BU are all truly interdisciplinary and interdepartmental. This creates a forum for students in different concentrations to work as a team and further learning in fields such as space research. Both Akbulut and De Carli attribute their success running SpaceVision 2015 to the education and leadership opportunities they’ve had in the College of Engineering and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE).

Six space professionals offered career advice. From left to right, Chair of SEDS-USA Hannah Kerner (moderator), Executive Director of Society of Satellite Professionals International Robert Bell, Advanced Propulsion Manufacturing & Integration Engineer at Virgin Galactic Kevin Zagorski, Avionics Engineer at Firefly Space Systems Drew Kelley, Propulsion Components Engineer at United Launch Alliance Matt Cannella, and Director of Lunar Programs at Way Paver Labs Patrick Gray. Photo by Bhumika Salwan (Questrom ’16).

“ECE has prepared me to help with SpaceVision by giving me the opportunity to lead in student groups such as Boston University Rocket Proposal Group. It’s given me the leadership skills that I have been able to translate into a much larger scale such as being Chair of this conference,” De Carli said.

The College of Engineering, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering and Center for Space Physics jointly sponsored the conference. Outside sponsors included Arizona State University School of Earth and Science Exploration and industry sponsors like Lockheed Martin.

 

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BU Satellite Team Gets Big Boost from NASA

November 10th, 2015 in Awards, ECE, Events, Faculty, Graduate Programs, Graduate Student Opportunities, Recognition, Students, Uncategorized, Video

Wireless Sensors Developed by Interdisciplinary Engineering Team to be Launched into Space

By Rich Barlow Video by Joe Chan for BU Today

On March 10, 1989, a solar eruption blasted plasma toward Earth. Canadian utility Hydro-Quebec noticed a hop-skip-and-jump in the voltage on its grid two days later. On March 13, with plasma sweeping Earth’s magnetic field and causing electric currents in the outer atmosphere, the grid shut down, plunging the province into darkness for nine hours.

Such bolts from the blue (or black) of space rarely wreak such havoc. But less severe irritants—interrupted radio transmissions, disrupted GPS devices, even rusting of pipelines—can result when electric currents course through the magnetic field, says Joshua Semeter, who’d like to know more about this phenomenon (largely because the magnetic field may be an essential ingredient for life on Earth). So would the federal government, which is why NASA has agreed to launch a network of wireless sensors named ANDESITE, developed by Semeter’s College of Engineering students to study changes in Earth’s magnetic field caused by space weather.

It is the final frontier, finally crossed: the first space launch for eight-year-old BU Student-satellite for Applications and Training, overseen by Semeter (ENG’92,’97), an ENG professor of electrical and computer engineering. Colloquially known as BUSAT, the program engages students in designing and operating small satellites. Earlier this year, the BUSAT group was one of the teams from a half dozen universities that beat out nine competitors to continue receiving support from the Air Force, which has contributed more than $500,000 to BUSAT projects. (BU also provided funding.) NASA will set a date for the launch late this year, Semeter says, assuming the agency’s review shows that ANDESITE’s ejecting sensors “won’t blow up their vehicle.”

ANDESITE sensors are DVD-sized boxes packed with electronics boards, and eight of them will hitch a ride on a NASA spacecraft that will spit them out roughly 280 miles above the Earth. Each sensor, traveling at a speed of approximately six miles per second, will complete an orbit of the Earth in roughly 90 minutes. The sensors will measure variations in electrical currents flowing in and out of the upper atmosphere along Earth’s magnetic field. “From this we will learn about how turbulence forms in space plasmas and what the eventual effects of this will be” on things like radio signals, allowing for better modeling of those effects, Semeter says.

ANDESITE’s success has already led to one terrestrial development, he adds. ENG has hired Brian Walsh (GRS’09,’12) as an associate professor of mechanical engineering. Walsh researches small satellites and space technology.

“This whole idea of taking any kind of spacecraft and spitting out small sub-payloads is really experimental,” says Semeter.
“This whole idea of taking any kind of spacecraft and spitting out small sub-payloads is really experimental,” says Semeter, although ANDESITE employs “technology that’s very well established here on Earth. They use it for self-driving cars and finding cabs in a city; Uber uses this kind of thing. This is wireless mesh network technology.…Our innovation was, why can’t we use that in space? What science could you do?”

In July, government representatives visited the students’ lab at the Engineering Product Innovation Center for a demonstration of how the sensors would deploy during an upcoming zero-gravity test flight, a nausea-inducing trial that previous BUSAT students have experienced firsthand. The students rigged a contraption to gently fire sensors into a mesh net, a form of soccer-meets-space.

“Looks like a good setup,” Zane Singleton of the Defense Department’s Space Test Program and tech company MEI Technologies said at the demonstration.

Earlier in the history of miniaturized satellites, “NASA didn’t give a rat’s ass” about them, Semeter says, with one official harrumphing, “Why would somebody who drives a Ferrari care about Matchboxes?” Then the National Science Foundation convinced NASA that solid science research could be done by mini-satellites. Today, ANDESITE is but one government effort to study space weather. Last February, a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellite was launched to record data about solar wind.

Cody Nabong (ENG’15), ANDESITE’s project manager, joined BUSAT on a buddy’s recommendation after being stymied in his search for an internship. (A picture of his friend on a zero-gravity flight was a grabber.) “I’ve been interested in aerospace since I came here, so it wasn’t a hard decision,” says Nabong, who appreciates the hands-on practice of the classroom concepts he’s studied that the team has provided. “The computer program that you use to make your 3-D models—I got a lot of practice with that. And then I learned a bunch about communications stuff that I wouldn’t have been exposed to if I had just had courses.…The biggest thing I’ve learned is how you meet requirements for an engineering project,” he says, referring to the government competitions and reviews the ANDESITE project has hurdled.

If the foregoing sounds uber-Star Trek-y, BUSAT’s members include some liberal arts disciplines majors who came for graduate engineering study through BU’s LEAP (Late Entry Accelerated Program) initiative. One BUSAT alumnus was a building contractor from San Francisco, who was “perfectly suited for this job,” says Semeter. “He’s used to going to the project site, telling people what to do. That’s all we needed. And he was technically competent.”

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Hip to Hacking Square

August 11th, 2015 in Alumni, Awards, ECE, Events, News-CE, Recognition, Uncategorized, Undergraduate Student Opportunities

ECE alums’ class project earns spot at Black Hat USA 2015

By Joel Brown, published in BU Today

Alexandrea Mellen (from left) (photo by Dmellendesigns), John Moore (photo by Chris Welch Photography), and Artem Losev (photo by Alexandrea Mellen).

Alexandrea Mellen (from left) (photo by Dmellendesigns), John Moore (photo by Chris Welch Photography), and Artem Losev (photo by Alexandrea Mellen).

The Square Reader, used by millions of businesses in the United States, could at one point be converted in less than 10 minutes into a skimmer that could steal and save credit card information, according to three recent ENG grads. Their findings will be presented today at the Black Hat USA 2015 cybersecurity conference in Las Vegas.

Computer engineering grads Alexandrea Mellen (ENG’15), John Moore (ENG’15), and Artem Losev (ENG’15) discovered the vulnerability last year in a project for their Cybersecurity class, taught by Ari Trachtenberg, an ENG professor of electrical and computer engineering.“The beauty of the hardware attack itself was that there would be no sure way to know if it was the merchant with the Square Reader that actually took your information,” Mellen says.

The trio also found that Square Register software could be hacked to enable unauthorized transactions at a later date.

“The merchant could swipe the card an extra time at the point of sale,” says Moore. “You think nothing of it, and a week later when you’re not around, I charge you $20, $30, $100, $200… You might not notice that charge. I get away with some extra money of yours.”

Moore, who was valedictorian of his ENG class, says the three reported the vulnerabilities to Square last fall, and the company quickly moved to close them. Square also sent Moore a $500 “bounty” for the software hack.

Moore says there is no evidence that either of the vulnerabilities has been used to scam credit card holders, but warns that the group’s findings raise red flags for the fast-growing mobile commerce field in general.

“This isn’t just about Square,” he says. “Over the past six years, mobile point-of-sale has really taken off…and all of these providers are offering new hardware and software to process payments, and customers are trusting their credit card information to new devices that haven’t been tested as much as traditional point-of-sale devices. They’re interacting with the personal cell phone of the merchant in a lot of cases. There’s just a lot going on.”

The three turned their class project into a paper that submitted to the Black Hat conference and waited two months before learning it had been accepted, which was a huge thing, “because Black Hat is the premiere information security conference in the world,” Mellen says. The weeklong event draws everyone from hackers to government officials. Mellen and Moore will give a 25-minute presentation on their work at the conference, where they get free passes to the briefings at the Mandalay Bay Resort and Casino, worth $2,195.

The Square Reader mobile point-of-sale device is the small white object plugged into the iPad Mini in this photo. Photo courtesy of Square Inc.

The Square Reader mobile point-of-sale device is the small white object plugged into the iPad Mini in this photo. Photo courtesy of Square Inc.

Trachtenberg says students have derived papers from class projects before, but none were undergraduates and none of the conferences have had the stature of Black Hat. “This is a conference with a very high impact,” he says. “There are 10,000 security professionals that pay a lot of money to come to this conference and listen to the latest interesting security research.”

Vulnerabilities in payment software present more of an inconvenience than a financial risk, he says, at least for consumers who check their credit card statements regularly, because losses are generally covered by the credit card companies.

“The bigger reason to be scared is that Square had security in mind from the very beginning and designed these to be secure,” he says. “They should have known better than to have left these kind of holes. It kind of bodes poorly for other vendors who might not be taking security quite as seriously and what kind of problems they might be having.”

Square doesn’t disclose how many businesses use its software or how much revenue it derives by taking a small percentage of their transactions, but Bloomberg quoted one analyst as estimating that the company took in $300 million in merchant fees in 2013.

Mellen and Moore say they made Square aware of the two potential problems late last fall, and the company was receptive to their warning.

Through the winter and spring, Square staffers discussed possible solutions and their difficulties with Moore on a page on the HackerOne platform, and they eventually settled on a solution that would alert the company if the hack was ever used.

Square did not respond in detail and declined to discuss specific solutions on the record with BU Today, but a spokesperson offered a statement: “With so many sellers relying on Square to run their business, we’ve made protecting them a priority. We protect sellers by encrypting transactions at the moment of swipe, tokenizing data once it reaches our servers, and monitoring every transaction to detect suspicious behavior. We’ve also recently migrated the small percentage of remaining sellers who use an out-of-date, unencrypted card reader to new hardware. Today, those unencrypted card readers no longer work. We’re always making advances in security, and we appreciate John Moore’s research, which encouraged us to speed up our deprecation plans.”

All three alums have other plans now. In September, Mellen will return to running her own company, Terrapin Computing LLC in Cambridge, which sells four iOS apps. Moore will start work as a software engineer for Google, and Losev will continue his computer science education at New York University.

Moore says another lesson to draw from their experience has nothing to do with hackers or credit cards and everything to do with the classroom.

“Don’t be afraid to take on a project that goes a little bit above and beyond what’s required,” he says. “We could have done a project that was a lot simpler and easier, but instead we decided to do something that was quite challenging for us. We learned a lot in the process. We put in a lot more time than we expected, and it ended up paying off in the long run.”

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Additional press coverage on ECE alums cyber security discovery: 

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Seeking 2015-16 ECE Senior Design Capstone Projects from Faculty, Industry, and Alumni ‘Customers’

July 31st, 2015 in Alumni, Awards, Courses, ECE, Events, Faculty, Graduate Programs, Graduate Student Opportunities

The Department of ECE is again seeking engineering challenges suitable for undergraduate seniors to address in their required capstone Senior Design project, a year-long, team-based course.  Would you or a colleague be able to suggest a project and serve as a volunteer ‘customer’?  We have a very large class this year so I do hope that you can help. Last year 2 of our teams were selected to compete in the finals round of the Intel-Cornell Cup competition at NASA and brought home First and Second prizes!

Each year Boston University’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering seeks real-world problems from industry, government, non-profits, small businesses, and individuals (especially our Alumni).  These problems are presented to our Senior Design capstone project student teams in early September.  Teams then work through the fall semester to develop a plan for delivering a solution to the problems and begin execution.  In the spring they complete their proposed design, test, and deliver the project prototype.   Many students report that capstone design was the single experience that best prepared them for employment and real-world challenges.

Projects guidelines are listed below, as is a sample one-page description template.  Please contact Professor Alan Pisano (apisano@bu.edu) to submit a project or discuss a potential project idea.  Students return to classes after Labor Day, and we would like to have general problem descriptions available shortly thereafter.  After projects are assigned to the teams, their first responsibility will be to contact their ‘customers’ and learn the details of the problems. We do not require financial support from our “customers” although many choose to donate equipment or other resources.

Helpful Links:

 

BU to Launch a Satellite in the Final Round of a US Air Force Space Challenge

July 28th, 2015 in Awards, ECE, Events, Faculty, Graduate Programs, Graduate Student Opportunities, News-CE, News-EP, Recognition, Research, Research-CE, Research-EP, Undergraduate Programs, Undergraduate Student Opportunities, Undergraduate Students

One of Six Teams Selected

By Gabriella McNevin

ANDESITE team presenting their satellite to a team of judges at the Air Force Final Competition Review (FCR) in Albuquerque, NM, February 2015.   BU was one of 6 schools out of 16 selected to move on.

ANDESITE team presenting their satellite to a team of judges at the Air Force Final Competition Review (FCR) in Albuquerque, NM, February 2015. BU was one of 6 schools out of 16 selected to move on.

ANDESITE, a task force within Boston University’s Small Satellite Program, qualified to launch a self-designed satellite into orbit. The ANDERSITE team is one of six that qualified for the final round of the US Air Force University Nanosat Program competition.

The ANDESITE satellite is on the forefront of an international movement to advance our understanding of “space weather” and its effects on society.  Space weather arises from interactions between the Earth’s plasma environment and the impinging solar wind.   These interactions can damage satellites, harm astronauts in space, render GPS information erratic and unreliable, disrupt ground-space communications, and even cause electricity blackouts on Earth.  In 2013, the White House raised inadequate space weather forecasting to the global agenda, citing the significant  “threat to modern systems posed by space weather events” and “the potential for “significant societal, economic, national security, and health impacts.”

The ANDESITE satellite has been designed to deploy a network of magnetic sensors from a central mother ship. The ejected sensors will operate collectively as a space-based wireless mesh network with the aim of studying fine-scale variations in Earth’s geomagnetic environment caused by space weather events.   The ANDESITE satellite’s scientific and technological innovations place it at the cutting edge of the burgeoning cubesat movement.

A computer generated image of the satellite.

A computer generated image of the satellite.

ANDESITE is a unique interdisciplinary university-wide collaboration.  The team of 16 students is comprised of Astronomy, Electrical, Computer, and Mechanical Engineering scholars. The group is under the guidance of two faculty advisors, Joshua Semeter (ECE/Photonics) and Ray Nagem (ME). Research Engineer Aleks Zosuls also provides support and acts as a liaison with the Engineering Product Innovation Center (EPIC).

The qualifying competition took place in the Kirtland Air Force Base in Albuquerque, New Mexico in February 2015. Now, the qualifiers must shift their focus from satellite fabrication to implementation. The University Nanosat Program will provide Air Force technical guidance and $110,000 to support each of the remaining six competitors.

After returning to Boston from New Mexico, ANDESITE advisor Professor Semeter recalled, “it was a stressful experience for the students with an exciting outcome.”

The University Nanosat Program provides hands-on experience for graduate and undergraduate students and an opportunity to create and launch a satellite with a specific research capacity. The Air Force Research Laboratory’s Space Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Office of Scientific Research and American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics developed the program in 1999.

ENG Alums Create Transforming Display Technology

June 18th, 2015 in Alumni, ECE, Events, Recognition, Research, Video

Prysm’s custom video walls use proprietary LPD technology

By Mark Dwortzan

Amit Jain (ENG'85,'88) beside the Prysm video wall installed in the 44 Cummington Mall lobby. Photo by Dave Green

Amit Jain (ENG’85,’88) beside the Prysm video wall installed in the 44 Cummington Mall lobby. Photo by Dave Green

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Prysm’s Olympic video walls allow architects, designers, and brand managers to create and customize unique, immersive experiences, engaging digital signage and unrivaled audience engagement in any number of environments. Photo courtesy of Prysm

After Amit Jain earned his first bachelor’s degree, in physics, chemistry, and math, in India, his older brother hired him to help out at the audiotape manufacturing company he owned in Kolkata. Despite knowing nothing about how to assemble audiotapes, Jain jumped right in and was soon running the factory floor.

Prysm video walls use up to 75 percent less energy than competing large-format display technologies. Photo courtesy of Prysm

Prysm video walls use up to 75 percent less energy than competing large-format display technologies. Photo courtesy of Prysm

That training later proved invaluable. During his senior year at the College of Engineering, Masud Mansuripur, then an associate professor of electrical engineering (now at the University of Arizona), made him an offer he couldn’t refuse: he would hire Jain as a research assistant and teach him everything he knew about optics if he decided to stay at ENG for graduate study. Jain (ENG’85,’88) accepted, and became one of the first ENG students to graduate with a master’s in electrical engineering with a focus on optics.

Fast forward to 2005. When investors asked Jain and his business partner, Roger Hajjar (ENG’88), to shift from optical networking to large displays, they came up with a new display technology that wound up transforming the industry—despite the fact that neither had prior knowledge of the field.

Jain and Hajjar cofounded Prysm, Inc., and their new display technology laid the foundation for the Silicon Valley–based designer and manufacturer of video wall systems now used across the globe by leading technology, retail, financial services, and media companies, governments, and universities, among them Beijing TV, CNBC, General Electric, and ENG.

“I have learned to never be afraid of trying new things and to go with my gut,” says Jain, 53, now Prysm CEO (Hajjar is CTO). “When we started Prysm, Roger and I had no fear of entering a new industry and no baggage from previous companies on what couldn’t be done—just ideas that could be applied in a new context. Within 18 months we came up with the concept for a new display technology, built a prototype, and shipped our first product.”

Today Prysm designs, assembles, installs, and provides software support for large, modular, interactive video walls of nearly any size, brightness, or resolution, customized to users’ needs, as well as 117-inch and 190-inch standard video walls used in collaboration rooms. The custom video walls enable architects, designers, and brand managers to provide unique, engaging, immersive experiences in lobbies, conference centers, control rooms, stores, and other environments. The collaborative walls empower teams in multiple locations to boost their productivity through real-time interactions, whether through touch or gesture, or by posting, sharing, and editing content uploaded from smartphones, tablets, or other mobile devices.

At the heart of Prysm’s video walls is the company’s proprietary laser phosphor display (LPD) technology, which features a solid-state ultraviolet laser engine, phosphor panel, and advanced optics. Mirrors direct beams from the laser engine across the phosphor panel, which in turn emits red, green, or blue light to form image pixels. The process occurs on multiple 25-inch tiles that fit together to make up a single integrated wall. Compared to conventional LED- and LCD-based technologies, LPD video walls deliver superior image quality, viewing angles, energy efficiency, and environmental impact—resulting in a lower ownership cost. With an an eco-friendly manufacturing process and nontoxic materials and requiring no consumables, they use up to 75 percent less energy than competing large-format display technologies and give off far less heat, eliminating the need for electrical system or HVAC upgrades.

“The Prysm video wall…delivers astounding image quality and ultrawide 178-degree viewing angles,” says Yao Hong, a sales director at the State Grid Corporation of China, which uses a curved, 80-foot-wide-by-11-foot-high wall to monitor the electrical grid system of China’s Jiangsu province. “These attributes combined with the tremendous scalability of LPD technology provide an ideal display solution for the command and control environment.”

Chris Van Name, a regional vice president at Time Warner Cable, chose Prysm to impress customers and minimize environmental impact. “Prysm’s video wall creates a significant ‘wow’ factor for any customer visiting our store and enables us to showcase our technologies in TV, broadband internet, and digital phone in a brilliant and beautiful fashion,” he says.

For Jain, Prysm represents the pinnacle of a 20-year career of growing successful technology-related businesses. Before cofounding Prysm, he was CEO of Bigbear Network and cofounder and CEO of Versatile Optical Networks, which was acquired by Vitesse Semiconductor Corporation; he led the Vitesse Optical Systems Division as vice president and general manager. Previously, he had held several management positions in start-ups and large companies, such as Terastor, Optex Communications, and Digital Equipment Corporation.

Throughout his career, Jain has drawn on expertise in both engineering and business and on lessons learned from an extended family, many also entrepreneurs. While working for his brother in the audiotape business, he imagined inventing technologies rather than just assembling them on the factory floor, so he came to ENG in 1983 to earn a second bachelor’s degree, in electrical engineering.

He learned not only engineering, but also how to communicate effectively to large groups as the first undergraduate teaching assistant of Kenneth Lutchen, a biomedical engineering professor at the time and now dean of ENG.

“Because I already had a bachelor’s degree, Ken gave me the opportunity to teach classes while still an undergraduate,” recalls Jain. “As I faced up to 40 friends and peers, I learned how to explain complex ideas clearly and concisely.”

Fortunately, he had already developed a penetrating voice, capable of drawing attention. “My projectile voice comes from survival of the fittest,” he says. “I have 48 cousins and am second from the bottom in age, so you needed a powerful voice to get your point across.”

After earning both undergrad and grad degrees at BU and an MBA at the University of Maryland, Jain became well-versed in the technological, communications, entrepreneurial, and other skills that are the hallmark of the societal engineer (basically, one who has a sense of purpose and appreciation for how engineering education and its experiences are superior foundations for improving society), a concept he embraces both as CEO of Prysm and as a member of the ENG Dean’s Leadership Advisory Board.

His close relationships with his family and his 200-plus employees, he says, are critical to his success and those relationships are anchored by his religion, Jainism, some of whose tenets—Don’t kill. Ask forgiveness. Respect different views—appear on a card he carries in his pocket.

“Everyone has a viewpoint,” he says. “The important thing is to listen to all views in order to make the right decisions.”

A version of this article appeared in Engineer.

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Remembering Arthur Thompson

June 8th, 2015 in Alumni, ECE, Events, Recognition, Uncategorized

First ENG Dean Put College on Path to Prominence

By Mark Dwortzan

Thompson opening the colleg

Opening of the College of Engineering Building at 110 Cummington Street in February, 1964. Left to right are, Merritt A. Williamson, dean of the College of Engineering and Architecture at Penn State, BU President Harold C. Case and BU College of Engineering Dean Arthur T. Thompson. Williamson gave the Convocation Address at the inaugural ceremony of the College. (Photo by BU Photography)

Arthur T. Thompson, the first dean of Boston University College of Engineering, died on May 9 at the age of 96.

Serving with distinction from 1964 to 1974, Thompson laid the foundation for the College’s accreditation, instituted novel degree programs and considerably expanded the College’s undergraduate and graduate offerings. His achievements helped pave the way for the College to become one of the world’s finest training grounds for future engineers and platforms for innovation in synthetic biology, nanotechnology, photonics and other engineering fields. Since 1964, the College’s position in the US News & World Report’s annual survey of US engineering graduate programs has surged from unranked to the top 20 percent nationally.

 

College of Engineering students in a typical lab setting on Cummington Street in 1964 (Photo by BU Photography)

College of Engineering students in a typical lab setting on Cummington Street in 1964 (Photo by BU Photography)

In 1963, Boston University hired Thompson, then a longtime associate dean of engineering at Penn State University, to become dean of the College of Industrial Technology (CIT). At the time, CIT offered only three degree programs—in technology, aeronautics and management—and occupied a single, four-story building, but Thompson was bullish about CIT’s future. Reflecting on that time during an interview conducted last year in advance of the College’s 50th anniversary, Thompson noted that “the soil was rich for this little technical school to grow.”

He pledged to develop engineers with “the capacity for responsible and effective action as members of our society” at dedication ceremonies on February 27, 1964, when CIT was officially renamed as the Boston University College of Engineering. His primary mission was to transform CIT into an accredited engineering program.

During his deanship, the new Aerospace, Manufacturing and Systems Engineering departments received accreditation. The College also instituted the nation’s first BS degree program in bioengineering and expanded to five BS and three MS programs in five fields.

“Dean Thompson took some major risks and took on the responsibility of starting a small engineering college in the shadow of a very large, world-class college across the river, and did it successfully,” said Dean Kenneth R. Lutchen.

“Art had defined the College—he recruited people willing to start with nothing,” recalled Professor John Baillieul (ME, SE). Key appointments included Richard F. Vidale, who would later head the Systems Engineering program, and Merrill Ebner, who headed the Manufacturing Engineering program.

“Thompson and [Ebner] came up with this idea of manufacturing engineering,” said Louis Padulo, who served as dean from 1975 to 1985. “They had the two first accredited programs in the country in systems engineering and manufacturing engineering—way ahead of their time. The real strength, almost like in any startup, is to do something innovative.”

Thompson left the College in 1974 having accomplished the mission he had signed up for a decade earlier. “I felt I had completed my job because the school had taken off, we were accredited and applications were coming in,” he said.

After serving Boston University as engineering dean, associate vice president and professor of engineering, Thompson became provost at Wentworth Institute of Technology.

He was a fellow of the American Society for Engineering Education and of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers, and a Registered Professional Engineer. In addition, he was a trustee emeritus at Colby College and Wentworth and served on the Academic Board of the US Merchant Marine Academy and as a trustee of Norwich University. His honors include the Education Award of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers and the Outstanding Civilian Service Medal of the US Army, in which he served during World War II.

Thompson received an arts degree from Colby College, an engineering degree from Penn State, amaster’s degrees in engineering from Harvard University and a master of business administration degree from the University of Chicago. He was also awarded honorary doctorates from Colby, Norwich and Wentworth.

Most recently residing in Newton, Thompson was predeceased by his wife of 70 years, Virginia (Deringer) Thompson, and survived by daughters Deborah A. and Harriet T. Thompson of Newton; granddaughter Ashima Scripp and husband Robert Bloomfield of Windham, NH; and great grandson Thatcher Bloomfield.

A memorial service will be held at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, 79 Denton Road, Wellesley on Friday, June 12 at 11 a.m. For tributes and guest book, visit www.duckett-waterman.com.

More information about Dean Thompson’s role in launching the College of Engineering can be found in the brochure ENG @ 50: Moving Society Forward.

The BEST Time to Be an Engineer is Now!

May 20th, 2015 in Alumni, Awards, ECE, Events, Faculty, Graduate Programs, Graduate Student Opportunities, Graduate Students, News-CE, News-EP, News-IDS, Recognition, Research, Students, Uncategorized

College of Engineering Celebrates New Graduates

By Jan A. Smith

Graduate Convocation speaker Farzad Kamalabadi (ECE, MS'94, PhD'01) professor of ECE and Statistics at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), exhorted the new masters and PhD graduates to combine science with policy work.

Graduate Convocation speaker Farzad Kamalabadi (ECE, MS’94, PhD’01) professor of ECE and Statistics at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), exhorted the new masters and PhD graduates to combine science with policy work.

There has never been a better time to be an engineer, because society has never needed these skills more urgently. This was the overarching message in speeches delivered at the College of Engineering’s undergraduate and graduate Commencement ceremonies on May 16.
In the morning, Dean Kenneth R. Lutchen welcomed the 268 graduating seniors and their families by acknowledging their accomplishment in completing what he described as the most challenging curriculum at Boston University.

“The single most important skill in life is the ability to work really hard,” he said. “There isn’t a student in any other college on this campus who has worked as hard as you to earn your place at today’s commencement. Now begins the opportunity to apply what you’ve learned and move society forward.”

2015-ENG-Commencement-Floral_web

The College of Engineering awarded 268 undergraduate degrees on May 16th. At a separate ceremony in the afternoon, Dean Ken Lutchen presented 68 Master of Science and 60 Master of Engineering degrees, and presided over the hooding of 18 PhD students.

Atri Raychowdhury (ECE’15), past Class of 2015 president and this year’s BU IEEE student chapter vice president, echoed this sentiment in his student address. He exhorted all to keep their passion for engineering strong. “Let us use our education to solve the Grand Challenges of society. This truly is our responsibility as Societal Engineers,” he noted to resounding cheers. “The end of our time here marks the beginning of a new journey.”

“Now is the best and most exciting time to be an engineer,” said Commencement speaker Dr. Angela M. Belcher, the W.M. Keck Professor of Energy at MIT’s Biological Engineering Laboratory and leader of a research team that engineers viruses to grow and assemble materials for energy, electronics and medicine. “From clean energy and the environment to healthcare, education, food and water, there has never been a time when we have had more opportunities to make an impact.”

Belcher, who founded Cambros Technologies and Siluria Technologies, has been cited by Rolling Stone, Time and Scientific American for her work’s impact on society.

Dean Lutchen presented Department Awards for Teaching Excellence to asst. professor Ahmad Khalil (BME), lecturer Osama Alshaykh (ECE) and assoc. professor Raymond Nagem (ME), who also received Outstanding Professor of the Year Award. The Faculty Service Award went to professor Joyce Wong (BME).

Later in the day, Lutchen presented 68 Master of Science and 60 Master of Engineering degrees, and presided over the hooding of 18 PhD students.

Farzad Kamalabadi (ECE, MS’94, PhD’01) professor of ECE and Statistics at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), exhorted the new masters and PhD graduates to combine science with policy work. “The world faces multiple problems of diminishing resources, which are all intertwined with social and economic stability,” he said. “You are poised to address these vital questions from a fresh, solutions-oriented perspective. But you can’t do it from within the scientific community alone. We need more engineers in Washington, Brussels, and the other policy centers of the world. It is crucial that the engineering leaders of the future – you – play central roles in social policy.”

ECE Senior Design Team Wins Top ENG Societal Impact Award

May 12th, 2015 in Alumni, Awards, ECE, Events, News-CE, News-EP, Recognition, Senior Design, Students, Undergraduate Programs, Undergraduate Student Opportunities

Project Enhances Learning for Students with Disabilities

By Mark Dwortzan

Each student takes a card (an RFID tag), taps it on the device, and in response they hear a greeting from a teacher or parent.

Each student takes a card (an RFID tag), taps it on the device, and in response they hear a greeting from a teacher or parent.

The students who attend Boston’s William E. Carter School come with major mental and physical disabilities, making learning a challenge. Seeking to enhance the learning environment at the school, the principal, Marianne

Kopaczynski, came up with the idea to install automated announcing systems that would deliver a personalized greeting for each student upon taking a specific action when entering a room. Her rationale: the technology would help the students, who range in age from 12 to 22, to make associations between cause and effect, developing their cognitive skills while making them feel welcome.

ECE seniors Yicheng Pan, Sihang Zhou, Alexis Weaver, Sinan Eren and Jose Bautista with their award-winning card reader at the Carter School.

ECE seniors Yicheng Pan, Sihang Zhou, Alexis Weaver, Sinan Eren and Jose Bautista with their award-winning card reader at the Carter School.

Now an ECE senior design team has designed and built three such devices and installed them in the school, to the delight of students and teachers alike. Each student takes a card (an RFID tag), taps it on the device, triggering a greeting from a teacher or parent, such as “Hi [student’s name], welcome to Art.”

In recognition of this achievement, the College of Engineering has named the team as first-place winners of the annual Societal Impact Capstone Award, which honors outstanding senior design projects aimed at improving the quality of life. Team members are Yicheng Pan, Sihang Zhou, Alexis Weaver, Sinan Eren and Jose Bautista.

“What possibly could be more societal than to provide a system to make a student who struggles with severe physical and mental challenges just to smile, make them feel comfortable, and at the same time help them understand cause and effect?” said Associate Professor of the Practice Alan Pisano (ECE), who advised the team and runs the ECE Senior Design Program.

To develop the system, the ECE seniors drew on their knowledge and skills in remote sensing, circuit design, application and database development and user interface development. Adhering to all applicable safety standards and taking advantage of resources at the Engineering Product Innovation Center (EPIC), they produced custom handheld and wearable RFID tags for each student; a desktop application and database to enter each student’s identification information; and a rugged, durable, user-friendly interface that can be updated and maintained by the school.

“For our students to acquire a skill, repetition is needed in everything we do,” said Kevin Crowley, an instructor at the Carter School who was a 2015 Massachusetts Teacher of the Year semifinalist. “The technology is easy to use, helps establish a consistent routine and will benefit our school greatly.”

Two previous ECE senior design teams took on the principal’s challenge but were unsuccessful.

“This team succeeded where prior teams failed, even solving last-minute problems and working around the clock to fix them,” said Pisano. “They visited the school on many occasions and stand ready to provide support if any operational issues arise. We plan to do additional projects for the school next year.”

The 2015 Societal Impact Capstone Award second place winners are “Pressure Profile for Kidney Stone Removal” by Nikolaos Farmakidis, Alexandros Oratis, Syed Shabbar Shirazi, John Subasic and See Wong, who assisted a Massachusetts General Hospital physician in determining the most suitable surgical procedure for medium kidney stone removal.

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