Mobile App Developers Win College’s Third Imagineering Competition

in Awards, Events, Undergraduate Student Opportunities
April 29th, 2014

By Mark Dwortzan

Downtyme, an app that makes it easier for college students and other overscheduled people to get together offline, won the $2,500 first prize at the College of Engineering's third annual Imagineering Competition. The team includes Timothy Chong (BME/CE'16), Luke Sorenson (CE/EE'16), John Moore (CE'16), Nick Sorenson (SMG'14) and Barron Roth (CE'16) (not pictured here).

Downtyme, an app that makes it easier for college students and other overscheduled people to get together offline, won the $2,500 first prize at the College of Engineering’s third annual Imagineering Competition. The team includes Timothy Chong (BME/CE’16), Luke Sorenson (CE/EE’16), John Moore (CE’16), Nick Sorenson (SMG’14) and Barron Roth (CE’16) (not pictured here).

Downtyme, an app that makes it easier for college students and other overscheduled people to get together offline, won the $2,500 first prize at the College of Engineering’s third annual Imagineering Competition.

Held April 17-18 at Ingalls Engineering Resource Center, the competition fielded entries from nine undergraduate engineering students or student teams that applied their creativity and entrepreneurial skills to build working prototypes of technologies aimed at improving the quality of life. Developed in the Singh Imagineering Lab and other on-campus facilities, this year’s projects ranged from a lab-crafted electric guitar to a stairway safety monitor for senior citizens.

Incorporating more than 25,000 lines of code, the Downtyme app displays friends on your screen in order of proximity and closeness of relationship to you.

Incorporating more than 25,000 lines of code, the Downtyme app displays friends on your screen in order of proximity and closeness of relationship to you.

Competitors described, demonstrated and defended their work before a panel of four judges—Associate Dean for Administration Richard Lally; Associate Dean for Educational Initiatives/Professor Thomas Little (ECE, SE); Jonathan Rosen, the College of Engineering’s director of Innovation Programs; and Associate Professor Daniel Cole (ME). The judges assessed each project for originality, ingenuity and creativity; quality of design and prototype; functionality; and potential to positively impact society.

From Facebook to Face-to-Face
Scoring high marks in all four categories, Downtyme enables Facebook friends with free time to find each other by uploading their calendars, selecting one friend or group of friends who are free and close by during a specified window of time, and inviting them to share a meal, study, play basketball, hang out, and more. Incorporating more than 25,000 lines of code, the app displays friends on your screen in order of proximity and closeness of their relationship to you.

“We think there’s a discrepancy between the time people spend on social media and the time they’d like to spend interacting in the real world,” said Luke Sorenson (CE/EE’16), who

Incorporating more than 25,000 lines of code, the Downtyme app displays friends on your screen in order of proximity and closeness of relationship to you.

Incorporating more than 25,000 lines of code, the Downtyme app displays friends on your screen in order of proximity and closeness of relationship to you.

developed Downtyme in the past four months with teammates John Moore (CE’16), Timothy Chong (BME/CE’16) and Barron Roth (CE’16).

“Our solution was to make a smartphone app that saves you from your smartphone,” added Moore. “Our idea is that you take out your phone, go to the App Store, and 30 seconds later you make plans with your friends.”

After the team launched a startup (Downtyme LLC) and rolled out a Beta version of the app for iPhones and Android mobile devices this spring, more than 1,200 users (mostly college students in Greater Boston) downloaded it and are now putting it to the test. The team plans to market the app to college students around the country, companies seeking to coordinate meetings, and other users looking for a convenient way to transact face-to-face connections.

Adrian Tanner (ME'15) (left) and Rhonda Silva (BME'15) (middle) won the $1,000 third place prize for their entry.

Adrian Tanner (ME’15) (left) and Rhonda Silva (BME’15) (middle) won the $1,000 third place prize for their entry.

“The Downtyme mobile app shows a highly developed awareness of how important personal contact is in an increasingly digital world,” said  Rosen. “All three winning projects show how our students are becoming Societal Engineers as they apply their engineering skills, creativity and entrepreneurship to improve the quality of life.”

Better Robots and Lab Experiments
The second prize winner, Konstantinos Oikonomopoulos (ME’14), received $1,500 for his project, “Hexapteron – A Six Degree of Freedom, Parallel, Semi-Decoupled Robotic Manipulator.” Oikonomopoulos shared first prize last year  for his automatic transmission-equipped “Smart Bike” and won second prize in the first Imagineering Competition for his highly-accurate, affordable, easy-to-assemble desktop 3D printer.

The Hexapteron can both translate and rotate objects about the x, y and z axes with three sets of software-controlled, carbon-fiber arms that move in parallel. It’s a next-generation, six-degrees-of-freedom manipulator with a unique design and properties that make it suitable for a wide range of applications, including affordable, desktop 3D printing on curved surfaces, multi-axis machining and multi-axis robotic assembly.

“The Hexapteron has never been built before,” said Oikonomopoulos, who took only a month to make the prototype, which occupies a workspace of 20 cubic centimeters and costs about $1,000. “I think this kind of device will one day replace many industrial robots.”

Adrian Tanner (ME’15) and Rhonda Silva (BME’15) won the $1,000 third place prize for their entry, “LickDat,” a device that monitors how frequently a laboratory mouse sucks on a water bottle containing a sweet, addictive, liquid food sample. Consisting of an Arduino (an open source electronics prototyping platform), LCD screen and liquid dispenser suitable for small rodents, the device was designed to support studies conducted by the Boston University Medical School Laboratory of Addiction Genetics on addictive behaviors towards food including obesity and compulsive eating disorders.

Whereas conventional lab equipment costs more than $300 and runs current through the mouse to detect each lick of the water bottle, LickDat costs less than $100 and uses capacitance sensors—a common technology in touchscreen surfaces—to detect licks.

Other entries included an automated diagnostic platform that communicates results via a smartphone app; a “Smart Mat” that adjusts heating, cooling, and lighting levels when someone steps into a room; a solar powered Stirling Engine designed to power cell phones and other low-energy devices; and an “Electronic Personal Trainer” that provides feedback to improve weightlifting performance.

Sponsored by John Maccarone (ENG’66), the competition was designed to reinforce the ideal of creating the Societal Engineer by spotlighting student efforts to design, build and test new technologies that promise to positively impact society.

Imagineering Lab programming is supported by the Kern Family Foundation and alumni contributions to the ENG Annual Fund.

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