Applying the Control Theory to Red Blood Cell Counts

in Events, Lectures, Research
April 4th, 2014

Simplification and Customization
Chelsea Hermond (SMG ’15)

Hollot-small

Professor C.V. Hollot, Department Head of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Massachusetts in Amherst.

“I wanted to do something that would impact the world,” exclaimed Professor C.V. Hollot, Department Head of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Hollot appeared as part of Boston University’s Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering Distinguished Lecture Series in early March. His forum focused on the regulation of cell populations in individuals using feedback-based drug-dosing protocols.

Dr. Hollot explained the drug protocol that he promotes by comparing it to the current drug-dosing system. Currently, a doctor guides the drug-dosage that is administered to a patient through a manual protocol. If one cell population is irregular, a doctor will use a chart to determine the specific drug dose to prescribe. In other words, if the cell count is between A and B, the doctor will administer the corresponding dose as is it shown on the chart.

In contrast to current standards, Dr. Hollot’s research suggests a more efficient drug-dosing process: automatic regulation of cell populations through feedback mechanisms. Dr. Hollot lectured that feedback-based mechanisms could potentially replace doctors using the feedback loop. The automatic dosing protocol is supported by Dr. Hollot’s research on real patients that were prescribed a drug named EPO, which regulates red blood cells in individuals with chronic kidney disease.

In summary, Hollot touted simplification and customization; “we need to be able to individualize protocol for each patient.”

To see a PDF file of Dr. Hollot’s slideshow, click here.

 

ECE will host Dr. Filbert Bartoli, Chandler Weaver Chair, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Lehigh University as the next distinguished lecturer:

  • Wednesday, April 9, 2014 at 4:00 pm
  • Photonics Center, 8 Saint Mary’s Street, Room 211
  • Topic: Interferometric Plasmonic Biosensor Arrays for High-Performance Label-Free Biomolecular Detection.
  • To learn more, please see the event flyer.