Bring in ’da Noise

in Events, Faculty, Graduate Programs, Graduate Student Opportunities, Graduate Students, Lectures, News-ISS, Research, Research-ISS, Students, Undergraduate Programs, Undergraduate Student Opportunities, Undergraduate Students
November 6th, 2013

Professor George J. Pappas, University of Pennsylvania, spoke as part of the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering Distinguished Lecture Series, which aims to bring groundbreaking engineers to the university to speak about their work.

Professor George J. Pappas, University of Pennsylvania, spoke as part of the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering Distinguished Lecture Series, which aims to bring groundbreaking engineers to the university to speak about their work.

Each day, we find ourselves sharing our personal information across the internet – whether it’s to pay a bill or buy a gift on Amazon.

As we send more of our data through these channels, there is a growing concern about privacy. Earlier this month, a breach at Adobe, for example, impacted more than 38 million users. Cases like this are not uncommon and as a result, cyber security has become a major area of research for electrical and computer engineers.

Last week, Professor George J. Pappas, the Chair of the Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania, visited Boston University and shared his own work on the topic.

Pappas is looking at how differential privacy, a method that aims to maximize the accuracy of information extracted from databases while also minimizing the chance of records being identified, can be applied to systems like smart grids and intelligent transportation systems.

“Privacy breaches are generally due to side information that a company collects,” Pappas explained. He believes that by using a differentially private mechanism to transfer information, it’ll be possible to hide secure data.

“You’re trying to hide in the noise and make it hard to know who’s who,” he said.

Pappas spoke as part of the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering Distinguished Lecture Series, which aims to bring groundbreaking engineers to the university to speak about their work.

Students, faculty members, and other members of the BU community listened to Pappas speak on October 23.

Students, faculty members, and other members of the BU community listened to Pappas speak on October 23.

Pappas believes that one of the greatest challenges is figuring out how to give companies like Google and eBay the information they need without the sensitive data they don’t.

An advantage of differential privacy, he said, is that once you indicate a particular segment of information is private, it stays private even after the data is sent to another system. Pappas believes that by adding noise during the streaming process, secure information can be blocked. The trick is figuring out how much noise should be added.

Pappas is a Fellow of IEEE and has received several awards including the Antonio Ruberti Young Research Prize, the George S. Axelby Award, and the National Science Foundation PECASE. In addition to differential privacy, his research focuses on control theory and, in particular, hybrid systems, embedded systems, hierarchical and distributed control systems, with application to unmanned aerial vehicles, distributed robotics, green buildings, and biomolecular networks.

Pappas’s talk was the second in the three-part Fall 2013 Distinguished Lecture Series. The next talk will feature Professor Larry A. Coldren, University of California, Santa Barbara, who will speak on the topic, “Photonic Integrated Circuits as Key Enablers for Coherent Sensor and Communication Systems.” Hear him on Wednesday, November 20, at 4 p.m. in PHO 211.

-Rachel Harrington (rachelah@bu.edu)