Category: Pictures

Department welcomes new Masters students

August 29th, 2014 in 2014, Graduate students, Pictures, Sept-14

The Department of Earth & Environment and the Center for Energy and Environmental Studies welcomes their new 2014-2015 Masters students.

 

 

 

 

 

2014 – 2015 Masters students

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 From left to right: Yang Du, Chris White, Kenneth Lacis, and Michelle Gilmore

Department welcomes new PhD students

August 29th, 2014 in 2014, Aug-14, Graduate students, Pictures

The Department of Earth & Environment welcomes its new PhD students this morning at a brief orientation held in CAS 132.

The students, pictured below, will be working with a variety of Professors in the department including Assistant Professor Michael Dietze, Assistant Professor Lucy Hutyra, and Professor Mark Friedl.

 

 

 

2014-2015 New PhD Students

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From left to right: Andrew Trlica, Alexey Shiklomanov, Elizabeth Cowdery, Paulo Arevalo, Ramona Hihn, and Radost Stanimirova

Kasey Aderhold participates in iMUSH “ultrasound” of Mt. St. Helens

August 8th, 2014 in 2014, Graduate students, July-14, Pictures, Trips

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Kasey Aderhold stands on Mount Margaret with Mount St. Helen in the background. Image credit Kasey Aderhold

 

Getting to know the inner workings of a volcano might seem like a nearly impossible task, but that’s exactly what Earth & Environment Ph.D. candidate Kasey Aderhold and a team of geophysicists set out to do during the two and a half week long experiment dubbed iMUSH, or Imaging Magma Under St. Helens.

As reported by the University of Rice News & Media department, a team of 75 geophysicists covered Mount St. Helens in over “3,500 active seismological sensors and 23 seismic charges” in order to get a “‘clear picture of the mountain’s inner workings.’”

The experiment will help scientists predict when and to what severity Mount St. Helens might potientially erupt in the future.

As part of the team, Aderhold spent the weekend hiking the instruments up and around the mountain for installation.

Read the full article on the experiment from Rice here, or check out the iMUSH website to learn more.

Members of the Department Celebrate The Lunar New Year

January 30th, 2014 in 2014, Events, Graduate students, January-14, Pictures, Researchers

As the Lunar New Year of the Horse approaches, members of the Department of Earth and Environment gathered together to celebrate the traditional holiday.

Graduate students, friends, and alumni work on making dumplings at the Lunar New Year Party.

Graduate students, friends, and alumni work on making dumplings at the Lunar New Year Party.

 

Held this past Saturday, January 25th 2014, the Department’s Lunar New Year Party featured traditional food, drink, and a dumpling wrapping contest.

Participants of the Dumpling Pageant work to make their best dumpling creations.

Participants of the Dumpling Pageant work to make their best dumpling creations.

 

The dumpling wrapping contest featured four winners: the cutest dumpling, the scariest, the most out-of-shape, and the ugliest dumpling.

 

The offerings in the Dumpling Pageant

The offerings in the Dumpling Pageant

 

Participants and spectators voted, and the winners were announced.

The winners of this years Dumpling Pageant. From left to right, Mary Farina, Bahareh Sanaie-Movahed, and Zhe Zhu. Not pictured is also winner Rita Cabral.

The winners of this years Dumpling Pageant. From left to right, Mary Farina, Bahareh Sanaie-Movahed, and Zhe Zhu. Not pictured is also winner Rita Cabral.

 

The party was a hit, and the winning–and losing–dumplings were cooked and enjoyed by all!

The contest winners--and losers--were cooked and enjoyed.

The contest winners–and losers–were cooked and enjoyed.

8th Annual RoBOT Program Final Gathering Held Wednesday Night

December 6th, 2013 in 2013, December-13, Ethan Baxter, Events, Faculty, Pictures, Presentations, Undergraduate

The final gathering of the 8th Annual Rocks Beneath Our Toes (RoBOT) Program was held Wednesday night.

The brain child of Department of Earth and Environment Professor Ethan Baxter, the RoBOT Program brings together local area high school students and BU undergraduates in an effort to learn more about the geology of the area. The students collect and analyze local rock samples and then display their findings at the end of the semester.

This years program was organized by Prof. Baxter and graduate student and Teaching Fellow Emily Stewart. The first step in the program is the collection of rock samples. This took place back in October when Professor Baxter and 13 of his ES 222 Mineralogy students took 20 Acton-Boxborough Regional High School students out on a rock collecting field trip.

Then, two weeks ago, the students came back together to analyze their findings:

Photo provided by Ethan Baxter.

Photo provided by Ethan Baxter.

The students used the Department’s polarized light microscopes to get a closer look at their samples.

 

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Photo provided by Ethan Baxter.

Then, Dr. Joel Sparks helped the students run the X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) system lab.

 

The culmination of the program took place Wednesday night as the 20 high school students returned to campus and were given special tours of our lab facilities:

Photo provided by Ethan Baxter.

Photo provided by Ethan Baxter.

First the students, donning special clean suits, toured our clean lab facilities where Department personnel and students prepare samples for analysis.

 

Photo provided by Ethan Baxter.

Photo provided by Ethan Baxter.

Then, Dr. Denise Honn led the students through a tour of the Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) lab.

Photo provided by Ethan Baxter.

Photo provided by Ethan Baxter.

Finally, Dr. Tom Ireland took the students through a tour of the Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (ICP-MS) facilities.

 

After the tours, the High School students were treated to a presentation of the Mineralogy students’ semester long research on their collected rock samples:

Photo provided by Ethan Baxter.

Photo provided by Ethan Baxter.

Dean Sapiro joined in as well. Here, her and a student discuss the results of the program.

 

Photo provided by Ethan Baxter.

Photo provided by Ethan Baxter.

The final results of the High School students’ and the Mineralogy students’ hard work are now on display in the halls of the Department, on the first floor of the Stone Science Building.

E&E Undergraduates take part in annual UROP Symposium

November 5th, 2013 in 2013, Events, November-13, Pictures, Presentations, Undergraduate

Graduating Geophysics & Planetary Science major Daniel Friedman and Environmental Analysis & Policy minor Sarah Chudnovsky recently took part in the 16th annual Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP) symposium.

Daniel Friedman

The symposium was held in the George Sherman Union Metcalf Ballroom from 11am to 1:30 pm on Friday October 18th, 2013 as part of Parent’s Weekend here at Boston University. Along with over 260 other students, Friedman and Chudnovsky displayed research for the over 600 symposium attendees. All participating students earned two academic credits as part of the research and symposium.

Sarah Chudnovsky's UROP Poster, Bhutan Research 10-18-13 copy

Established in 1997, the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program has “supported the research efforts of approximately 1500 Boston University students” (UROP). The deadline for Spring 2014 research applications are due by noon Friday December 6th.

To learn more information about UROP, visit their website or visit their Facebook page to see more pictures from the symposium.

Photos in this article were taken by Sayaka Yamaki

Prof. Ethan Baxter leads RoBOT program field trip.

October 24th, 2013 in 2013, Ethan Baxter, Faculty, October-13, Pictures, Trips, Undergraduate

This past Saturday, Professor Ethan Baxter led a group of Boston University undergraduates and area high schoolers on a field trip to take samples of local rocks as part of the the Department of Earth and Environment’s “Rocks Beneath Our Toes” (RoBOT) Program.

Twelve  of Dr. Baxter’s ES222 Mineralogy students along with 20 Acton-Boxborough high school students explored several sample sites in the Acton-Boxborough community, collecting rock samples for later analysis. The Mineralogy students carried on into the afternoon collecting samples from sites in New Hampshire, the last of which were outcrops on Dean Virginia Sapiro’s property.

Dr. Baxter and his students will use petrographic microscopes to analyze thin sections from the collected samples over the coming weeks; while RoBOT high school participants perform background research on the geography and underlying geology of the sample locations.  Later this fall, the students will reunite at BU to discuss their findings and analyze the rock samples. The participants will then display their findings in a poster session.

For more information on the RoBOT program, check out Prof. Baxter’s flyer.

For more information about upcoming events at the Department of Earth and Environment see our calendar or check out our recent news.

See pictures from the trip:

Professor Baxter and students explore the unique story that each rock holds about its geologic past.

Professor Baxter and students explore the unique story that each rock holds about its geologic past.

 

Students explore a rock outcrop to find samples for analysis.

Students explore a rock outcrop to find samples for analysis.

Students and Faculty gather for a group shot in front of a rock formation.

Students and Faculty gather for a group shot in front of a rock formation.

Professor Fulweiler’s Message in a Bottle

January 30th, 2013 in 2013, Faculty, January-13, News, Pictures, Robinson "Wally" Fulweiler

BU prof: estuary mud tells dire eco-story

Boston University BU, Robinson Wally Fulweiler, College of Arts and Sciences CAS, Earth Sciences professor, associate director of BU Marine Program, ecology research, faculty Robinson "Wally" Fulweiler, coastal ecology research, estuary sediment, Waquoit Bay, Falmouth, nitrogen global impactFor ecologist and biogeochemist Robinson “Wally” Fulweiler, every pungent vial of coastal muck tells a story. Meticulously pieced together in a laboratory that mimics nature, that story is alarming. As she explains, the life-sustaining chemical balance of the planet’s coastal ecosystems is changing dramatically, a result of ever-climbing levels of nitrogen and phosphorous from soil erosion, mining, urban waste, and synthetic fertilizers. In the coastal estuaries and marshes of the Massachusetts shore, Fulweiler, a College of Arts & Sciences assistant professor of earth and environment and of biology, is charting the impact of this destruction, hoping that her findings will raise an alarm about the need to protect these marine resources from further harm.

From the tidal flats of Plum Island to the National Estuarine Research Reserve at Waquoit Bay in Falmouth, she is, in every sense, knee-deep in experiments probing changes in a range of marine nutrients along the Bay State coast. But her lab’s general mission, its “connecting theme,” as she puts it, is the ways that humans have altered coastal systems. From industrial pollution to sewage contamination to straining of resources, the list is long, and much of the damage irreversible, says Fulweiler, whose research focuses on global as well as local impacts of environmental change.

Funded by the National Science Foundation and Sea Grant, a program underwritten by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Fulweiler’s work led her and several colleagues to create “The Eutrophication Commandments,” an environmental manifesto published this year in Marine Pollution Bulletin. Commandment number one: “Thou shall protect coastal ecosystems to deliver biodiversity and ecological services.”  Click for full article and video on BU Today…

Prof. Baxter Heads RoBOT Outreach Program

October 18th, 2012 in 2012, Ethan Baxter, Faculty, Pictures, Undergraduate

robot10Students look at sedimentary rocks from the age of the dinosaurs in Central Massachusetts

On October 13th, Undergraduates enrolled in ES222 “Mineralogy” were joined by Concord-Carlisle High School (CCHS) students as part of the 7th annual RoBOT “Rocks Beneath Or Toes” Outreach Program run by Prof. Ethan Baxter each Fall. Together, students sampled rocks and sediments from several sites in the Concord-Carlisle area and Massachusetts. The field trip was the first of three RoBOT events this semester, the next two of which will bring CCHS students together with BU students to analyze those samples in our mineralogy and geochemistry labs at BU. Click for more information on the RoBOT Outreach Program…

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Students look at calc-silicate minerals in a old lime quarry in Chelmsford, MA
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The entire group standing on the CCHS pitcher’s mound (which was sampled for analysis)