Category: Robinson “Wally” Fulweiler

Amanda Vieillard and Robinson Fulweiler published in Ecology Today

July 15th, 2014 in 2014, 2014, Alumni, Faculty, July-14, Publications, Robinson "Wally" Fulweiler

Amanda Vieillard, who recently earned her MS with Robinson Fulweiler here at Boston University, was published by the Ecological Society of America.

The paper, “Tidal pulsing alters nitrous oxide fluxes in a temperate intertidal mudflat,” co-written by Robinson Fulweiler, can be read here.

Amanda Vieillard is currently working towards her Ph.D. at UCONN. You can see more of her articles here.

 

Wally Fulweiler’s “The Immortal Life of Nitrogen” lecture available online

June 10th, 2014 in 2014, Events, Faculty, June-14, News, Presentations, Robinson "Wally" Fulweiler, Talks

Earth & Environment Associate Professor Robinson “Wally” Fulweiler‘s recent New England Aquarium lecture titled “The Immortal Life of Nitrogen” is now available online.

It can be accessed via our department media section by clicking here; Fulweiler’s lecture is the first video available on the playlist.

You can also see the entire New England Aquarium Lecture Series on their YouTube Channel.

You can learn more about the work of Assoc. Prof. Fulweiler by visiting her lab website or checking out her recent publications and grants.

You can view other department media including short news stories and more in-depth lectures by visiting our Department Media Section.

 

 

Reminder: Wally Fulweiler’s talk tomorrow at New England Aquarium at 7:00 pm

June 2nd, 2014 in 2014, Faculty, June-14, Robinson "Wally" Fulweiler, Talks

Associate Professor Robinson “Wally” Fulweiler will be at the New England Aquarium tomorrow, Tuesday June 3rd, at 7:00 pm to give a lecture on “The Immortal Life of Nitrogen.”

It will be open and free to the public.

To learn more about the event, visit the New England Aquarium Lecture Series website.

Click here to get directions to the aquarium.

 

Read the talk’s abstract below:

Without nitrogen there would be no life—no me, no you, no blue whale, no Atlantic cod, no Antarctic krill. But too much nitrogen leads to a series of negative consequences. Human activities have more than doubled the amount of nitrogen cycling through the biosphere in the past 100 years, and in doing so we have introduced large amounts of nitrogen to coastal waters. This excess nitrogen has led to eutrophication, loss of submerged aquatic vegetation, harmful algal blooms, increased low oxygen conditions and dead zones, fish kills, and loss of biodiversity. Fortunately, we can take steps to mitigate this excess nitrogen and to decrease future inputs to marine waters. Fulweiler will tell the story of how one of the greatest inventions of the 20th century transformed our planet and how each of us can help save our coastal ocean through simple, easily adaptable changes.

 

Wally Fulweiler attends, chairs session at Joint Aquatic Sciences Meeting

May 29th, 2014 in 2014, Faculty, May-14, Meeting, Presentations, Robinson "Wally" Fulweiler, Talks, Trips

Last week, Earth & Environment Associate Professor Robinson “Wally” Fulweiler was in Portland Oregon attending the Joint Aquatic Sciences Meeting 2014.

The meetings held May 18th to 23rd focused on the topics of “Bridging genes to ecosystems: aquatic science at a time of rapid change.

During the event, Fulweiler co-chaired a session titled “We’ve got a nitrogen fixation! Exploring, integrating, and understanding N fixation along the freshwater to marine continuum.”

At the session she co-chaired, Fulweiler delivered a talk titled “The observer effect: quantifying the impact of the acetylene reduction assay on marine sediment n-fixers.”

Additionally, along with five other authors including past and present BU alums, Fulweiler co-authored a talk titled “Sediment N2 production from shore to shelf–a methods comparison.” It was delivered at the session titled, “Nitrogen transformation mechanisms at the sediment-water-interface in aquatic ecosystems over a range of latitudes,” a session chaired by lead author of the talk, Amber Hardison of the University of Texas Marine Science Institute.

To learn more about Professor Fulweiler’s work, check out her recent publications or her lab website.

You can also access additional stories about Professor Fulweiler here.

Wally Fulweiler to give public talk at New England Aquarium Tuesday June 3rd

May 29th, 2014 in 2014, Events, Faculty, June-14, News, Robinson "Wally" Fulweiler, Talks

Earth & Environment Professor Robinson “Wally” Fulweiler will be at the New England Aquarium this coming Tuesday June 3rd, 2014 to give a talk on “The Immortal Life of Nitrogen” as part of the New England Aquarium’s Lecture Series.

The talk will be begin at 7:00 pm and last one hour.

It will be open and free to the public.

To learn more about the event, visit the New England Aquarium Lecture Series website.

Click here to get directions to the aquarium.

 

Read the talk’s abstract below:

Without nitrogen there would be no life—no me, no you, no blue whale, no Atlantic cod, no Antarctic krill. But too much nitrogen leads to a series of negative consequences. Human activities have more than doubled the amount of nitrogen cycling through the biosphere in the past 100 years, and in doing so we have introduced large amounts of nitrogen to coastal waters. This excess nitrogen has led to eutrophication, loss of submerged aquatic vegetation, harmful algal blooms, increased low oxygen conditions and dead zones, fish kills, and loss of biodiversity. Fortunately, we can take steps to mitigate this excess nitrogen and to decrease future inputs to marine waters. Fulweiler will tell the story of how one of the greatest inventions of the 20th century transformed our planet and how each of us can help save our coastal ocean through simple, easily adaptable changes.

Wally Fulweiler, former student publish paper in Frontiers in Plant Science

May 28th, 2014 in 2014, 2014, Faculty, May-14, Publications, Robinson "Wally" Fulweiler

Earth & Environment Associate Professor Robinson “Wally” Fulweiler has published a new paper in the journal Frontiers in Plant Science.

The article, “Silica uptake by Spartina–evidence of multiple modes of accumulation from salt marshes around the world,” is a joint project between Fulweiler and lead author and former Earth & Environment Ph.D. student Joanna Carey.

The article was published online May 20, 2014 and can be accessed here.

Joanna Carey graduated with a Ph.D. in Earth Sciences in 2013 and is now a post-doctoral associate at Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole.

The paper is a product of Carey’s dissertation here at Boston University.

To learn more about the work of Wally Fulweiler, check out her recent publications or visit her lab website.

You can also read other new stories about Professor Fulweiler here.

 

 

 

Sergio Fagherazzi, Wally Fulweiler, and students publish paper

May 14th, 2014 in 2014, 2014, Faculty, Graduate students, May-14, Publications, Robinson "Wally" Fulweiler, Sergio Fagherazzi, Undergraduate

Earth & Environment Associate Professor Sergio Fagherazzi first authored and Associate Professor Robinson “Wally” Fulweiler co-authored a new paper in the journal Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science.

The paper, “The relationship among hydrodynamics, sediment distribution, and chlorophyll in a mesotidal estuary,” was published in the 144 volume of the journal on May 1st, 2014. The article can be read by clicking the title.

Working with Fagherazzi and Fulweiler are current and former Earth & Environment students G. Mariotti, A. T. Banks, and E. J. Morgan.

To learn more about Fagherazzi’s work, check out his list of recent publications and grants.

To learn more about Fulweiler’s work, check out her list of recent publications and grants.

 

Wally Fulweiler promoted to Associate Professor

May 8th, 2014 in 2014, Awards, Faculty, May-14, Robinson "Wally" Fulweiler

Earth & Environment’s Robinson “Wally” Fulweiler has been promoted from Assistant Professor to Associate Professor with tenure.

The announcement of her promotion is featured in a BU Today article published this morning.

To read the BU Today article, click here.

To learn more about Fulweiler’s work, visit her profile page or her lab website; or check out her list of recent publications and grants.

Congratulations to Wally!

 

Grad Student Sarabeth Buckley presents work at New England Estuary Research Society

May 6th, 2014 in 2014, Faculty, Graduate students, May-14, Robinson "Wally" Fulweiler, Talks, Trips

First year Earth & Environment Ph.D. student Sarabeth Buckley gave a talk this past weekend as part of the New England Estuary Research Society (NEERS) Spring Meeting in Salem, MA.

Buckley’s talk was titled “Salt Marshes and Sea Level Rise in Long Island Sound: A Synthesis.”

Buckley is advised by Assistant Professor Robinson “Wally” Fulweiler.

Also presenting at the NEERS Spring Meeting was another one of Prof. Fulweiler’s students, first year Biology Ph.D. student Tim Maguire. Maguire’s talk, “Urbanized Watersheds – Potential Sources of Silica to Receiving Waters” won honorable mention for best graduate student talk.

To learn more about Wally and her students check out her website, or see her recent publications and grants.

 

Graduate Student Sarah Foster Awarded National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship

April 29th, 2014 in 2014, April-14, Awards, Faculty, Graduate students, Robinson "Wally" Fulweiler

Earth & Environment Graduate Student Sarah Foster was recently award the highly competitive National Defense Science and Engineering (NDSEG) Graduate Fellowship.

The fellowship will support Foster’s Ph.D. work for the next three years starting this September.

Foster is a Ph.D. candidate working with Assistant Professor Robinson “Wally” Fulweiler on coastal biogeochemistry.

To learn more about Prof. Fulweiler and Sarah Foster’s work, visit Wally’s profile, or check out her lab website.