Category: Faculty

Robert Kaufmann featured in article on current state of world oil markets

January 26th, 2015 in 2014, 2015, Faculty, Jan-15, News, Robert Kaufmann

Robert Kaufmann

Robert Kaufmann

Earth & Environment Professor Robert Kaufmann was recently featured in an article published on Public Radio International.

The article, “How Saudi Arabia can stop America from producing more fuel,” describes the current state of the world oil markets and how American produced oil is one of the “big reasons [] gas prices have plummeted over the last couple of months.”

To read the entire article, click here.

To learn more about the work of Prof. Kaufmann, check out his profile page.

Former Research Professor Xiaowen Li Passes Away

January 23rd, 2015 in 2015, Alan Strahler, Curtis Woodcock, Faculty, Jan-15, News, Researchers

Former Geography Research Professor Xiaowen Li succumbed to illness in Beijing on January 10th at the age of 67. Working closely with Professors Alan Strahler, Curtis Woodcock, and Crystal Schaaf, Professor Li developed a succession of physical models of directional reflectance of forest land cover that saw wide use in land remote sensing. He was also the primary architect of the algorithms underlying the MODIS BRDF/Albedo product. Soon after the MODIS launch, Professor Li transitioned to Beijing Normal University (BNU), where he held the rank of Professor and Dean in the School of Geography, and most recently served there as the Director of the Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems Research Center. He also served as the Director of the Institute of Remote Sensing Applications of the Chinese Academy of Science from 2002-2008, and was the Principal Investigator for several important Key Projects in remote sensing supported by the Chinese Academy of Science under the five-year planning mechanism.

Professor Li’s contributions were recognized with his appointment as Academician of the Chinese Academy of Science in 2001. He also received several prestigious science prizes from that academy and the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology in China.

In contributions to Boston University, Professor Li served as the liaison for an academic exchange program in remote sensing between BU and Beijing Normal, which brought BNU doctoral students to BU. He also generously endowed a fund within the Department of Geography and Environment for assistance to the exchange students.

He is survived by his widow, Wu Chuanqi, and his two daughters, Li Jie and Li Zhung, who reside in the United States.

In recent years, Professor Li’s quiet and self-effacing demeanor, unusual for an Academician, was recognized through social media and earned him the title of the “Cloth Shoes Academician.” Here follows two translations of media reports on his death, kindly provided by Dr. David Jupp of CSIRO, Australia, also a friend and colleague of Professor Li. Text and photographs of Professor Li’s funeral are posted on the web site i.feng.com/news.

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Translated From:  http://www.wenxuecity.com/news/2015/01/10/3937484.html

The “Cloth Shoes” Academician, Li Xiaowen has passed away. From now on the “Humble Sage”1 is no longer with us 

This popular web based image of Academician Li Xiaowen was taken on April 18, 2014 as he delivered a lecture at the Chinese Academy of Sciences university. From his plain monastic dress, unkempt beard and cloth shoes, it is clear how he has become the "Teacher Immortal." (http://www.wenxuecity.com/news/2015/01/10/3937484.html)

This popular web based image of Academician Li Xiaowen was taken on April 18, 2014 as he delivered a lecture at the Chinese Academy of Sciences university. From his plain monastic dress, unkempt beard and cloth shoes, it is clear how he has become the “Teacher Immortal.” (Source)

 

On the 10th [of January 2014], the reporter learned from the web that Academician Li Xiaowen of the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Director of the Centre for Geographic Information at Beijing Normal University, also known popularly as the “Cloth Shoes Academician”, had passed away in Beijing.

Brief summary of academic achievements:

Academician Li Xiaowen graduated from the Chengdu Academy of Telecommunications Engineering in [Sichuan Province, China in] 1968. In 1985 he achieved Master and PhD degrees in Geographic Science, and Master in Computer and Electronic Engineering [in the US] at the University of California at Santa Barbara. He has been Head of the Institute of Remote Sensing Applications at the Chinese Academy of Sciences and Dean and Teaching Professor in the Department of Natural Resources and Environment at Beijing Normal

University. [At the University] He was The Great River Meritorious Professor2, specializing in the fundamental theory of remote sensing science. He is originator of the Li-Strahler geometrical optics model which has been recognised by the International Society for Optical Engineering [SPIE] as a “Landmark achievement”, and he has achieved great fame at home and abroad in Remote Sensing Science.

In 2014, a report and photograph of Academician Li Xiaowen, with his plain and simple clothing and footwear, became popular on the Web, with some Netizens3 feeling that Li Xiaowen looked like a “Humble Sage”: [eg] “with humble demeanour but who from a seemingly inconspicuous role, displayed amazing gifts and brought about miraculous achievements.”

 

Related Report:

The Cloth Shoes Academician gives a lecture at University – the Weibo Netizens “Humble Sage”

Wearing plain and simple monastic dress, without socks, and wearing black cloth shoes, with thin features, grizzled hair and straggling beard, 67 year old Academician Li Xiaowen sits lecturing his works at the Chinese Academy of Sciences University. His humble presence is “like that of an immortal Sage”: Since the end of 1970, Li Xiaowen has been engaged in research into the area of Geography and Remote Sensing Information Science. He was originator of the Li-Strahler Geo-Optical Model, which was selected by the International Society for Optical Engineering [SPIE] as a “Landmark achievement”. The research achievements he and his team have made have advanced the development of quantitative remote sensing science, and made China one of the leaders in the field of quantitative Remote Sensing Science.

____________________

1 Literally, “the sweeping monk”. A monk sweeping the temple yard is in the position of a lowly person and emphasises virtuous unimportance. Apparent unimportance brings little fame and recognition but they are of little importance to a monk.

2 As Great River Professor, Li Xiaowen would have been used to the endless noise of the apes on the banks as he drifted from Baidi City through endless mountains of new ideas.

3 It is wonderful that people in the social media age, where your value is measured by number of friends multiplied the number of likes, can value unimportance, it is also wonderful they recognised the true nature of Li Xiaowen behind the picture.

 

 

 

 

Nathan Phillips authors piece featured on The Conversation

January 23rd, 2015 in 2015, Faculty, Jan-15, Nathan Phillips, News, Pub-15, Publications

Nathan Phillips

Nathan Phillips

Earth & Environment Professor Nathan Phillips has written an article featured on the online new source, The Conversation.

Phillips’ piece”Will Obama’s ‘fugitive methane’ plan reduce or increase our dependence on natural gas?” focuses on “President Obama’s proposal to reduce leaks of methane gas from oil and gas drilling” and highlights how the language of the plan suggests a long term reliance on natural gas, “whose by-product of combustion, carbon dioxide, is the planet’s largest agent of climate change.” Phillips then discusses the ramifications of such a long term reliance and offers alternative solutions to how natural gas should be treated in the coming years.

To read the full article, click on the title above of click here.

To learn more about Phillips’ work, check out his profile page.

Graduate Student Seminars return tomorrow

January 22nd, 2015 in 2015, Department Seminars, Faculty, Graduate students, Guido Salvucci, Jan-15, Sergio Fagherazzi

Nicoletta Leonardi

Nicoletta Leonardi

Angela Rigden

Angela Rigden

Earth & Environment Graduate Student Seminars will begin for the Spring semester this Friday, January 23rd, at 3 PM in CAS 313.

This weeks presenters will be Nicoletta Leonardi presenting on “Salt marsh resistance to violent storms and hurricanes;” Angela Rigden presenting on Multi-decadal estimation of trends in evapotranspiration from weather station data using a new approach;” and Kira Sullivan-Wiley on “What shapes risk perception? An analysis form a high-risk agricultural area of Uganda.”

All students and faculty in the department are expected to attend and audience members will be asked to complete a short evaluation to help provide feedback to the students.

Kira Sullivan Wiley

Kira Sullivan Wiley

Nicoletta Leonardi is a PhD candidate in Earth Science with an emphasis on coastal geomorphology working with Associate Professor Sergio Fagherazzi. Angela Rigden is a PhD candidate in Earth Science with an emphasis on hydrology working with Professor Guido Salvucci. Kira Sullivan-Wiley is a PhD candidate in Geography with an emphasis on valuation and realization of ecosystem services; her advisor is Assistant Professor Anne Short.

 

Sean Mackay, Dave Marchant, and Jen Lamp publish article in Journal of Geophysical Research

January 20th, 2015 in 2015, Dave Marchant, Faculty, Graduate students, Jan-15, Pub-15, Publications

Sean Mackay

Sean Mackay

Earth & Environment PhD candidate Sean Mackay has first authored a new paper published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface.

The article, “Cold-based debris-covered glaciers: Evaluating their potential as climate archives through studies of ground-penetrating radar and surface morphology,” is also coauthored by E&E Professor Dave Marchant and E&E PhD candidate Jennifer Lamp.

Jennifer Lamp

Jennifer Lamp

To read the article, click here.

Dave Marchant

Dave Marchant

To learn more about Dave Marchant’s work, check out his profile page or his list of recent publications.

Ranga Myneni coauthors paper in Global Change Biology

January 20th, 2015 in 2015, Faculty, Jan-15, Pub-15, Publications, Ranga Myneni

Ranga Myneni

Ranga Myneni

Earth and Environment Professor Ranga Myneni coauthored a paper in Global Change Biology with a multi-national group of researchers on the detection and attribution of vegetation greening trend in China over the last 30 years.

The paper can be downloaded from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/gcb.12795/pdf

Wally Fulweiler’s coauthored paper receives press coverage

January 20th, 2015 in 2015, Faculty, Jan-15, News, Pub-15, Publications, Robinson "Wally" Fulweiler

R. Wally Fulweiler

R. Wally Fulweiler

Earth & Environment Associate Professor. R. Wally Fulweiler recently co-authored a paper published in BioScience.

Since its publication, the paper, “Reconsidering Ocean Calamities,” has been featured in two news stories at Nature  News “Deep mysteries” and “Ocean ‘calamities oversold, say researchers.”

To read the paper, click here. To read the articles, click on their respective titles.

To learn more about Fulweiler’s work, visit her lab website or check out a list of her recent publications.

 

Sarabeth Buckley participates in two-week, intensive ecology program at The Cary Institute

January 20th, 2015 in 2015, Faculty, Graduate students, Jan-15, Robinson "Wally" Fulweiler, Trips

Sarabeth Buckley

Sarabeth Buckley

Earth & Environment PhD student Sarabeth Buckley has just returned from an intensive two week ecology seminar at the world-renowned Cary Institute. The prestigious seminar focused on the Fundamentals of Ecosystem Ecology and was taught by leading experts in the field.

Buckley wrote about her experiences at the seminar in a blog post shared on her website. To read the post, click here.

Buckley is a second year student working towards a doctorate in Earth Science. She is advised by Earth & Environment Associate Professor R. Wally Fulwelier.

Wally Fulweiler gives invited seminar at Marine Biological Lab

January 16th, 2015 in 2015, Faculty, Jan-15, Robinson "Wally" Fulweiler, Talks

R. Wally Fulweiler

R. Wally Fulweiler

Earth & Environment Associate Professor R. Wally Fulweiler gave an invited lecture this past Tuesday, January 13th, at the Marine Biological Lab.

The seminar was titled “Shore Nitrogen Cycling – Variation in Space and Time.”

To learn more about Fulweiler’s work, visit her website.

Wally Fulweiler, Phd Candidate Tim Maguire, Alumni Joanna Carey, and Adrien Finzi publish article in Frontiers

January 15th, 2015 in 2015, Alumni, Faculty, Graduate students, Jan-15, Pub-15, Publications, Robinson "Wally" Fulweiler

R. Wally Fulweiler

R. Wally Fulweiler

Earth & Environment Associate Professor Robinson “Wally” Fulweiler has first authored a new paper published in Frontiers in Plant Science.

The paper, “Does elevated CO2 alter silica uptake in trees?“, is the first to examine the impacts of elevated CO2 on the terrestrial Si cycle.

Second author on the paper is Fulweiler’s PhD student Tim Maguire; Earth & Environment alumni Joanna Carey, now working as a postdoctoral associate at the Marine Biological Lab, and Biology Professor Adrien Finzi also co-authored the paper.

The paper is available now online here.

To learn more about Fulweiler’s work, check out her website or check out a list of her recent publications.