Category: Michael Dietze

Istem Fer, Elizabeth Cowdery, and Mike Dietze publish in Biogeosciences

October 4th, 2018 in 2018, Faculty, Graduate students, Michael Dietze, News, Oct-18, Pub-18, Publications, Researchers

Postdoc Istem Fer, PhD candidate Elizabeth Cowdery, and Associate Professor Mike Dietze have co-authored “Linking big models to big data: efficient ecosystem model calibration through Bayesian model emulation” in Biogeosciences. “Bayesian methods provide a rigorous data assimilation framework for these applications, especially for problems with multiple data constraints,” the authors note. “However, the Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques underlying most Bayesian calibration can be prohibitive for computationally demanding models and large datasets. We employ an alternative method, Bayesian model emulation of sufficient statistics, that can approximate the full joint posterior density, is more amenable to parallelization, and provides an estimate of parameter sensitivity.”

Associate Professor Mike Dietze to deliver NSF Distinguished Lecture

September 20th, 2018 in 2018, Events, Faculty, Michael Dietze, News, Presentations, Sept-18

On September 27 Associate Professor Mike Dietze will deliver the Distinguished Lecture for the National Science Foundation, hosted by the Directorate for Biological Sciences and Division of Biological Infrastructure. His talk is entitled “Solving the Challenge of Predicting Nature: How Close Are We and How Do We Get There.”

Is nature predictable? If so, how can we better manage and conserve ecosystems? Near-term ecological forecasting is an emerging interdisciplinary research area that aims to improve researchers’ ability to predict ecological processes on timescales that can be validated and updated.

Professor Dietze will discuss the challenges and opportunities in near-term ecological forecasting, which span advances in environmental monitoring, statistics and cyberinfrastructure. He will present a framework to understand the predictability of ecological processes and highlight ongoing efforts to build an ecological forecasting community of practice.

Professor Dietze will address the current state of and potential for developing forecasts for a wide range of ecological processes, including:

    • Vegetation phenology and land-surface fluxes
    • Ticks, tick-borne disease and small mammal hosts
    • Soil microbiome
    • Aquatic productivity and algal blooms
    • Advancing statistical and informatic tools for ecological forecasting.

Associate Professor Mike Dietze hosts NOAA webinar on predicting nature

September 11th, 2018 in 2018, Events, Faculty, Michael Dietze, News, Presentations, Sept-18

Associate Professor Mike Dietze hosts “Solving the Challenge of Predicting Nature: How Close Are We and How Do We Get There?” as part of NOAA’s National Ocean Service Science Seminar Series.

Wednesday, September 12, 12-1PM EDT

Is nature predictable? If so, can we use that understanding to better manage and conserve ecosystems? Near-term ecological forecasting is an emerging interdisciplinary research area that aims to improve our ability to predict ecological processes on timescales that can be meaningfully validated and iteratively updated. In this talk I argue that near-term forecasting is a win-win for accelerating basic science and making it more relevant to society. I will focus on the challenges and opportunities in this field, spanning advances in environmental monitoring, statistics, and cyberinfrastructure. I will present a first-principles framework for understanding the predictability of ecological processes and synthesizing this understanding across different systems. Finally, I will highlight ongoing efforts to build an ecological forecasting community of practice.

Access: Mymeeting webinar uses phone for and internet. Audio is only available over the phone: dial toll-free from US or CAN:1-877-708-1667. Enter code 7028688# Skype sometimes works with a good connection. For the webcast, go to www.mymeetings.com Under “Participant Join,” click “Join an Event,” then add conference number 744925156. No passcode is needed for the web. Be sure to install the correct plugā€in for WebEx when logging on – the temporary webex application works fine.

Research led by E&E alum Arnold Fernandes highlighted in EOS

April 9th, 2018 in 2018, Alumni, Apr-18, Faculty, Graduate students, Michael Dietze, Pub-18, Publications, Sergio Fagherazzi

A new publication by E&E alum Arnold Fernandes and E&E PhD student William Kearney has been highlighted in Earth & Space Science News. In their article, “Declining Radial Growth Response of Coastal Forests to Hurricanes and Nor’easters,” published in the Journal of Geophysical Research – Biogeosciences, Fernandes, Kearney, and their colleagues “adopt a dendroclimatic and statistical modeling approach to understand the response and resilience of a coastal pine forest to extreme storm events, over the past few decades.” They suggest their results “can help predict vegetation response patterns to similar disturbances in the future.” Their co-authors include E&E faculty members Michael Dietze and Sergio Fagherazzi.

Associate professor Michael Dietze wins Hariri Incubation Award

February 9th, 2018 in 2018, Awards, Faculty, Feb-18, Michael Dietze, News

Associate professor Michael Dietze and Abraham Matta of the Hariri Institute for Computing have received a Hariri Research Incubation Award for their project “A Scalable and Secure Cyberinfrastructure for the Repeatability of Ecological Research.”

Associate professor Michael Dietze publishes on ecological forecasting in PNAS

January 31st, 2018 in 2018, Faculty, Jan-18, Michael Dietze, News, Pub-18, Publications

Associate Professor Michael C. Dietze and his colleagues have just published “Iterative near-term ecological forecasting: Needs, opportunities, and challenges” in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States (PNAS). “Near-term forecasts provide the opportunity to iteratively cycle between performing analyses and updating predictions in light of new evidence,” Dietze and his co-authors argue. “This iterative process of gaining feedback, building experience, and correcting models and methods is critical for improving forecasts.”

Associate professor Michael Dietze publishes in Global Change Biology

September 18th, 2017 in 2017, Faculty, Michael Dietze, Pub-17, Publications, Sept-17

Associate professor Michael Dietze has co-authored “Vegetation Demographics in Earth System Models: a review of progress and priorities” in the journal Global Change Biology. “…We review the developments that permit the representation of plant demographics in [Earth System Models],” writes Dietze and his colleagues, “and identify issues raised by these developments that highlight important gaps in ecological understanding.” Click here to read the full article.
 

New book by associate professor Michael Dietze now available

May 17th, 2017 in 2017, Faculty, May-17, Michael Dietze, News, Pub-17, Publications

Associate Professor Michael Dietze has published Ecological Forecasting through Princeton University Press. “Dietze shows us how to approach forecasting using models based on large datasets and how to make the results easy to digest,” writes one reviewer. “This book is certain to be a benchmark in the science of ecological forecasting for decades to come.”

 

 

Read the update on Michael Dietze’s tickborne disease research

March 23rd, 2017 in 2017, Faculty, Grants, Mar-17, Michael Dietze, News

“To protect personnel on Southeastern military installations from tickborne diseases, a federal program has awarded a five-year, $2.45 million grant to a team of researchers with the University of Florida Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and other institutions.” That includes BU and Associate Professor Michael Dietze.

Click to read the full release.

Congratulations to former EE postdoc Christine Rollinson on new research position

January 17th, 2017 in 2017, Faculty, Jan-17, Michael Dietze, News, Researchers

Christine Rollinson, a former postdoctoral associate with Associate Professor Michael Dietze, has joined the Morton Arboretum’s Center for Tree Science as their Forest Ecologist.