Category: Department Seminars

Dr. Birendra Jha to speak tomorrow at Solid Earth Seminar

May 19th, 2014 in 2014, Department Seminars, May-14

Dr. Birendra Jha will be in the department tomorrow, May 20th, 2014, to give a talk as part of the Solid Earth Seminar Series.

His talk, “Geomechanics of faults and induced seismicity,” will be held at 12:30 in room 141c.

Dr. Birendra Jha is a post-doc at MIT.

Kira Sullivan-Wiley and Paul Lyons to give talks as part of Graduate Student Seminar Series

May 8th, 2014 in 2014, Department Seminars, Graduate students, May-14

Earth & Environment Graduate Students Kira Sullivan-Wiley and Paul Lyons will be giving talks tomorrow, Friday May 9th, as part of the Graduate Student Seminar Series.

Their talks will be held at 3:30 pm in STO 453.

Refreshments will be served following the talks.

 

The abstracts of the talks are as follows:

 

“The roles of information, institutions, and space in disaster risk reduction” by Kira Sullivan-Wiley

Kira’s work looks at the way that people see and manage for particular risks and benefits in their environments. It assesses the role of formal programs, the flow of information, and spatial heterogeneity in shaping these perceptions and behaviors. It’s a complex system, and Kira looks at it in an area of high environmental risk (landslide) and benefit (agriculture) in Uganda.

 

“Predicting Demand for Electric Vehicle Infrastructure in Massachusetts” by Paul Lyons

As an alternative to traditional vehicles with inefficient internal combustion engines powered by liquid fossil fuels, plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) hold great promise, capable of travelling 70 to 110 miles per gallon (MPG) and using a wide range of efficient electricity sources which are readily available, including renewable wind and solar resources. Who is purchasing electric vehicles in Massachusetts, where do they live, and is the infrastructure being built to accommodate them?  Paul will explain what tools he is using to answer these questions, and what the early results indicate.

Two guest speakers to give talks Thursday as part of Special Solid Earth Seminar

May 7th, 2014 in 2014, Department Seminars, Ethan Baxter, Faculty, May-14

Associate Professor Ethan Baxter will be hosting two guest lectures tomorrow, Thursday May 8th, as part of a Special Solid Earth Seminar.

The first lecture will be held at 10:00 am in CAS 141C. It will feature Dr. Lenka Baratoux of the IRD in Toulouse, France. Dr. Baratoux’s talk is titled “Tectono-metamorphic evolution of the West-African granite-greenstone terrains during the Eburnean orogeny (~2.2-2.0 Ga).”

The second lecture will be held at 1:00 pm in CAS 141C. It will feature Prof. David Baratoux of the Université de Toulouse, France. Prof. Baratoux’s talk is titled “The formation and evolution of the Martian crust.”

All are welcome to attend!

Conor Gately & Mary Farina to give talks as part of Graduate Student Seminar Series

May 1st, 2014 in 2014, Department Seminars, Graduate students, Ian Sue Wing, Lucy Hutyra, Mark Friedl, May-14

The Department of Earth & Environment Graduate Student Seminar Series will feature talks this week by graduate students Conor Gately and Mary Farina.

This week’s seminar will be held at 3:30 pm this Friday, May 2nd, in STO 453.

Refreshments will be served following the talks.

Conor Gately is a PhD Candidate being advised by Associate Professor Ian Sue Wing and Assistant Professor Lucy Hutyra.

Mary Farina is receiving her Masters in Geography this year and is an advisee of Professor Mark Friedl.

 

Abstracts of the talks:

“CO2, Cars and Cities: Does Driving Diminish with Density?” by Conor Gately

The talk will present recent results from the development of a new, multi-decadal, high-resolution inventory of U.S. on-road CO2 emissions. Analysis of emissions trends in urban and rural areas reveals a complex relationship between road travel, CO2 emissions, and population density. These results have implications for urban growth scenarios, as well as for policies to mitigate vehicle emissions and reduce traffic congestion in major urban areas.

“Relationships between tree rings and satellite-based canopy greenness in mixed temperate forests” by Mary Farina

This project examines links between ground-based and satellite-based measures of tree growth in the Northeast United States.  Correlations between tree ring widths, Landsat vegetation indices, and Landsat-based phenology records are investigated.

Bardy Hardiman to speak as part of Terrestrial Biogeoscience Seminar Series

April 30th, 2014 in 2014, April-14, Department Seminars, Researchers, Talks

Earth & Environment Post-doc Brady Hardiman will be giving a lecture later today, April 30, as part of the Terrestrial Biogeosciences Seminar Series.

Hardiman’s talk will be held at 3:30 pm in CAS 442; refreshments will be served immediately following.

To learn more about department related events, check out our calendar of events.

Ann Dunlea and Nicolette Leonardi to give talks as part Earth & Environment Graduate Student Seminar Series

April 24th, 2014 in 2014, April-14, Department Seminars, Faculty, Graduate students, Rick Murray, Sergio Fagherazzi

Graduate Students Ann Dunlea and Nicolette Leonardi will be giving talks tomorrow, April 25th, at 3:30 pm in STO453 as part of the Earth & Environment Graduate Student Seminar Series.

Ann Dunlea is a PhD candidate working with Professor Rick Murray. Her focus is on Marine Biogeochemistry.

Nicolette Leonardi is a PhD candidate working with Associate Professor Sergio Fagherazzi. Her focus in on Coastal Geomorphology.

Refreshments will be served following the talks.

Abstracts of the presentations are as follows:

 

“Paleoceanography of the South Pacific Gyre” by Ann Dunlea

The South Pacific Gyre (SPG) is Earth’s largest oceanic desert due to its low levels of biological productivity.  It also has the slowest sedimentation rates of the global ocean. The geochemistry of SPG sediment provides clues to large-scale changes in this vast ocean region and surrounding continents throughout the past 100 million years, including the formation of Australia’s deserts, Southern Hemisphere volcanism, and the opening of major oceanic gateways.

 

“How waves shape salt marshes” by Nicoletta Leonardi

We used cellular automata simulations and high resolution field measurements of five sites along the United States Atlantic Coast to investigate the erosion of marsh boundaries by waves. Our results justify the unpredictability of erosion events and the possibility of large failures episodes of marsh boundaries despite of a low exposure to wave action.

Peter Raymond to give talk as part of the Terrestrial Biogeosciences Seminar Series

April 23rd, 2014 in 2014, April-14, Department Seminars

Peter Raymond of Yale University will be in the building later today, April 23rd, to give a talk as part of the Terrestrial Biogeosciences Seminar Series.

Raymond’s talk is titled “The Pulse-Shunt-Concept: A new conceptual framework for understanding biogeochemistry of drainage basins.” It will be held at 3:30 pm in CAS 442; refreshments will be served immediately following.

To learn more about department related events, check out our calendar of events.

Edward Cunningham to give talk as part of Terrestrial Biogeosciences Seminar Series

April 16th, 2014 in 2014, April-14, Department Seminars, Edward Cunningham, Faculty, Talks

Earth & Environment Assistant Professor Edward Cunningham will be giving a talk later today, April 16th, as part of the Terrestrial Biogeosciences Seminar Series.

Cunningham’s talk will be held at 3:30 pm in CAS 442; refreshments will be served immediately following.

To learn more about department related events, check out our calendar of events.

Dylan Mikesell to give talk as part of Solid Earth Seminar

April 14th, 2014 in 2014, April-14, Department Seminars

Dylan Mikesell of MIT will be in the Department tomorrow, April 15th, to give a talk as part of the Solid Earth Seminar Series.

Mikesell’s talk, “An introduction to seismic interferometry and imaging seismic noise,” will begin at 12:00 and be in Room 141C.

Mikesell is a post-doctoral associate at MIT and currently teaches ES360 Geodynamics here in the Department of Earth & Environment.

To learn more about department related events, check out our calendar of events.

Jared Woolacott and Dan Gianotti to give talks Friday at 3:30 in STO453 as part of Graduate Student Seminar Series

April 8th, 2014 in 2014, April-14, Department Seminars, Graduate students

This Friday marks the return on the Department of Earth & Environment Graduate Student Seminar Series.

The  seminar will take place beginning at 3:30 pm and will feature presentations by Earth & Environment Graduate Students Jared Woolacott and Dan Gianotti.

Jared Woolacott will begin the seminar with his talk titled “Modeling ecosytem dynamics in general equilibrium.”

Dan Gianotti will immediate follow with his talk titled “Real weather, Fake weather, and the California Drought.”

Refreshments will be served immediately following the event.

To learn more about upcoming Graduate Student Seminars, visit the Department of Earth & Environments calendar.

Abstracts of the talks:

“Modeling ecosystem dynamics in general equilibrium” by Jared Woollacott

This work adapts optimization-based, input-output modeling techniques of economic general equilibrium theory to a biophysical setting. The bioenergetic general equilibrium (BGE) model developed here offers a novel contribution to the theoretical biology literature and, through integration with economic general equilibrium models, has the potential to significantly advance integrated assessment modeling. The model is ideal for assessing human-environment interactions and the policies that guide them.

 

Real weather, fake weather, and the California Drought” by Dan Gianotti

Dan’s current research is on using “Stationary Stochastic Weather Models” in comparison with real precipitation data to study the climatic predictability of rain.  This presentation will show applications of these methods for looking at the current California drought to attempt to determine how “unusual” it really is.