Category: August-13

Professor Hutyra Nominated to NACP Scientific Steering Committee

August 28th, 2013 in 2013, August-13, Faculty, Joining Team/Committee, Lucy Hutyra

he North American Carbon Program (NACP) is a multidisciplinary research program to obtain scientific understanding of North America’s carbon sources and sinks and of changes in carbon stocks needed to meet societal concerns and to provide tools for decision makers. Successful execution of the NACP will require an unprecedented level of coordination among observational, experimental, and modeling efforts regarding terrestrial, oceanic, atmospheric, and human components. The NACP is supported by a number of different federal agencies through a variety of intramural and extramural funding mechanisms and award instruments. NACP will rely upon a rich and diverse array of existing observational networks, monitoring sites, and experimental field studies in North America and its adjacent oceans. Integrating these different program activities and maximizing synergy amongst them, will require expert guidance beyond the norm for large field programs in Earth system science and global climate change.

Click for the NACP website…

Rita Cabral – First Author In Nature Paper

August 19th, 2013 in 2013, 2013, August-13, Graduate students, Publications

Anomalous Sulphur Isotopes in Plume Lavas Reveal Deep Mantle Storage of Archaean Crust

Basaltic lavas erupted at some oceanic intraplate hotspot volcanoes are thought to sample ancient subducted crustal materials1, 2. However, the residence time of these subducted materials in the mantle is uncertain and model-dependent3, and compelling evidence for their return to the surface in regions of mantle upwelling beneath hotspots is lacking. Here we report anomalous sulphur isotope signatures indicating mass-independent fractionation (MIF) in olivine-hosted sulphides from 20-million-year-old ocean island basalts from Mangaia, Cook Islands (Polynesia), which have been suggested to sample recycled oceanic crust3, 4. Continue reading at Nature.com…