Resources for Students

The Future of the Textbook according to publishers

February 28th, 2011 in Digital Scholarship, Scholarly Communication, student-resources.

Josh Fischman’s post on “The Wired Campus” section of The Chronicle for Higher Education includes a podcast with William D. Rieders, executive vice president for new media at the publishing company Cengage Learning. Rieders says ““An e-book is not an engaging experience….” Publishers are working to provide much more than simply replicating print textbooks in an electronic format such as homework tools, assessment mechanisims, etc.

http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/podcast-the-future-of-the-textbook-as-seen-by-publishers/30026

Make Textbooks Affordable

October 13th, 2010 in student-resources.

by The Right to Research Coalition

Untitled from The Right to Research Coalition on Vimeo.

Open Access 101

October 13th, 2010 in student-resources.

by The Right to Research Coalition

Open Access 101 from The Right to Research Coalition on Vimeo.

Animated video explaining open access to research and why it’s important.

Animated by Karen Rustad.

The Digital Natives are Getting Restless: The Student Voice of the Open Access Movement

October 13th, 2010 in student-resources.

by The Right to Research Coalition

The Digital Natives are Getting Restless: The Student Voice of the Open Access Movement from The Right to Research Coalition on Vimeo.

The Digital Natives are Getting Restless: The Student Voice of the Open Access Movement from The Right to Research Coalition on Vimeo.

Students today are digital natives. We’ve grown up in a world of unfettered access to digital information, instant gratification in the best possible sense. Yet when we need access to scholarly journals, we’re suddenly locked out. Though our education literally depends on them, we’re often cut off from journals crucial to our research, our papers, and our understanding of both details and the larger picture. However, students, in addition to numerous other stakeholders, are quickly realizing that access barriers to journals are as unnecessary as they are harmful. We’re working to reform the current academic publishing system into one that is open and equitably serves the interests of all who depend on it, not just those who can afford the often high cost of access.

Given by Nick Shockey, Director of the Right to Research Coalition, and Director of Student Advocacy at the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC) at the Apple-sponsored AcademiX 2010 conference.