Peer Review in Academic Promotion and Publishing: Its Meaning, Locus, and Future

in Scholarly Communication
April 23rd, 2010

Peer Review in Academic Promotion and Publishing: Its Meaning, Locus, and Future. Diane Harley, Ph.D., Principal Investigator, Sophia Krzys Acord, Ph.D., Sarah Earl-Novell, Ph.D.

(Research and Occasional Papers Series)

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Abstract
As part of its Andrew W. Mellon Foundation-funded Future of Scholarly Communication Project, the Center for Studies in Higher Education (CSHE) has hosted two meetings to explore how peer review relates to scholarly communication and academic values. In preparation for an April 2010 workshop, four working papers were developed and circulated. They are presented as drafts here. (The proceedings from the April 2010 meeting will be published at a future date.) The topics covered include assessing the myriad forms peer review takes in the academy, which forms of peer review are used for which specific academic purposes (e.g., tenure and promotion, publishing, extramural funding, national and international stature), the considerable costs to universities in subsidizing the entire peer review process through faculty salaries, and the perception that, although peer review represents the best available system, there are nonetheless a multitude of problems with it, including its inherent conservatism.

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