Calendar

  • MATLAB (MATrix LABoratory) is a numerical computing environment developed by MathWorks, Inc. In short, MATLAB is a highly optimized interpreted programming language designed for intuitive and fast development of scientific computing software. This “hands-on” tutorial will introduce the MATLAB programming environment and the basic tools you will need to write your own MATLAB programs. Topics include matrix variables and operations, reading/writing data, plotting, loops, conditional statements, scripts, and functions. No prior programming experience in any language is required to attend this course.

  • There are many actions researchers can take to increase the openness and reproducibility of their work. Please join us for a workshop, hosted by the Center for Open Science, to learn easy, practical steps researchers can take to increase the reproducibility of their work. The workshop will be hands-on. Using example studies, attendees will actively participate in creating a reproducible project from start to finish.

    This workshop is aimed at graduate students, postdocs, and faculty across disciplines, who are engaged in quantitative research. The workshop does not require any specialized knowledge of programming. Participants will gain a foundation for incorporating reproducible, transparent practices into their current workflows.

    Attendees will need to bring their own laptop in order to fully participate.

    Date: Sept. 20, 2017
    Location: Mugar Library Estin Room (302)
    Time: 9:00-12:00

    Register

  • Good data organization is the foundation of any research project. We organize data in spreadsheets in the ways that we as humans want to work with the data, but computers require that data be organized in particular ways. In order to use tools that make computation more efficient, such as programming languages like R or Python, we need to structure our data the way that computers can read. In this lesson, you will learn: Good data entry practices - formatting data tables in spreadsheets; How to avoid common formatting mistakes; Approaches for handling dates in spreadsheets; Basic quality control and data manipulation in spreadsheets; and Exporting data from spreadsheets.

    Attendees will need to bring their own laptop in order to fully participate.

    Date: Sept. 21, 2017
    Location: Mugar Library Estin Room (302)
    Time: 12:30-1:30

    Register

  • Autodesk Maya 2017 is a powerful state-of-the-art 3D modeling and animation software package. It has a wide variety of modeling, animation, special effects, and rendering tools. It has a customizable graphical user interface as well as a scripting language for optimal flexibility in problem solving and production. In this tutorial we will show you how to get started using Maya. We will teach you the basic workflow for modeling, creating and applying materials, animation, and rendering. We will also cover the basics of importing scientific geometric data and creating high quality renderings and animations from it. Ordinarily Maya is considered to have a steep learning curve, but in this tutorial we will present a workflow which will provide a sound foundation for pursuing more complex projects.

  • This Perl tutorial, offered on the BU Medical Campus, is designed with some possible bioinformatical applications of the language in mind. It is oriented towards those who have little or no prior programming experience and would like to get a solid start. It will introduce Perl through an integrated approach, covering all of the fundamentals of the Perl language, from code design and implementation to debugging and execution. It will also include information on the Perl help system, to ease the learning curve and provide an entry point for continuous exploration of the language. The tutorial itself will focus mostly on methodology and concepts; however, it will make an effort to achieve this goal through several quite simple, yet representative, code examples. The entire tutorial will be divided into two sessions. The first session will give students a brief overview and general information about Perl, with some hands-on exercises. The second session will focus on some frequently used language features, such as file I/O, string processing, regular expressions, and even some more advanced features, such as code reuse. All of the features will be introduced through some real bioinformatical examples. Please remember to sign up for both sessions to complete the tutorial.

  • Sept 22, 2017

    This tutorial is primarily aimed at those who have some experience working in a Linux environment and programming in R. The topics covered in this tutorial: debugging and profiling R code, choosing the right functions to speed-up your code, parallelization techniques, tuning your code for faster performance on the SCC cluster.

  • The OpenMP application program interface (API) provides simple and flexible tools to develop parallel software for shared-memory multiprocessor systems. The basic approach to parallelizing with OpenMP is to insert special comments (directives) into the code that assist the compiler in mapping computation onto the CPUs. The beauty of this approach is that it is often possible to create efficient parallel code with only minor modifications to a serial code. This tutorial covers the major features of OpenMP through discussion and examples in C and Fortran. Some experience in C or Fortran programming is assumed. Understanding of parallel programming in general is helpful, but not required.

  • MATLAB programs can be exceptionally fast if they are well-designed, and painfully slow if not. Fortunately, it does not take a professional programmer to write an efficient MATLAB program or to take advantage of multi-core processors and computer clusters. This tutorial will introduce (1) using MATLAB on the BU SCC, and (2) optimizing MATLAB codes. The first part will cover how to use the MATLAB platform remotely and how submitting batch jobs for MATLAB works. In the second part, some useful skills for removing unnecessary computation and optimizing memory usage will be introduced. The skills you learn should enable you to solve bigger problems faster using MATLAB.

  • For those who are planning or who are currently conducting clinical or translational research, CTSI-sponsored open consultation sessions are held for study design and statistical analysis. Meet with Howard Cabral, MPH, PhD, SPH Biostatistics, Christine Chaisson, MPH, SPH Data Coordinating Center and Eric Jones, SPH Data Coordinating Center. Accommodations can be made for those unable to attend drop-in sessions. CRC researchers are encouraged to confirm anticipated attendance. Please contact Howard Cabral at hjcab@bu.edu with any questions. Drop-in sessions are held every Tuesday, from 11 am to 12 pm, room E747, Evans (E) Building.

  • Originally designed to render computer graphics, GPUs now provide the ability to accelerate scientific applications traditionally handled by CPUs. This tutorial is an introduction to general programming using GPUs. We will explore the applications that would benefit the most from GPU acceleration, go over different languages and software tools available on our Linux cluster, and discuss their benefits for different types of applications.

  • Sept 26, 2017

    On contemporary computers, speeding up computations is most often achieved by employing multiprocessors concurrently on shared memory, multicored nodes or multiprocessor distributed memory clusters. MPI is a library of communication functions to enable and enhance multiprocessing on these computer architectures. This tutorial introduces many of the basic MPI functions through practical examples. Working knowledge of C or Fortran is required to attend the course. Basic knowledge of Unix/Linux will be helpful.

  • This tutorial covers a high level overview and best practices for managing projects on the Shared Computing Cluster (SCC). Topics include compute resources, project creation, project management, storage/SU allocation management, and the Buy-In Program. Recommended for new research faculty/staff, Lead Project Investigators (LPIs), Administrative Contacts, and active researchers on the SCC.

  • This tutorial will show you how to do calculations with CUDA C/C++, an API for programming massively parallel GPUs. In this tutorial you will learn to do the following tasks in CUDA: write a basic “Hello, World!” program; write and launch CUDA C kernels; manage GPU memory; run parallel kernels in CUDA C; parallel communication and synchronization; race conditions and atomic operations. C/C++ programming experience is required for this tutorial. You do not need prior parallel programming or graphics experience.

  • OpenRefine (originally Google Refine) is a free, open source tool with powerful features to help you clean and transform your data. Following Data Carpentry's OpenRefine lesson this introduction to Open Refine will cover:

    + What OpenRefine is and why you should use it
    + OpenRefine's major features
    + How to launch OpenRefine and create a project
    + How to facet, filter, and sort data

    Attendees will need to bring their own laptop in order to fully participate. This is the first part of a two part series. Please arrive with OpenRefine already installed!

    Installation guides and "office hours" for installation assistance will be provided after registration.

    Date: Sept. 28, 2017
    Location: Mugar Library Estin Room (302)
    Time: 12:30-1:30

    Register

  • The MATLAB Parallel Computing Toolbox allows you to write programs that leverage multi-core processors, GPUs, and computer clusters by dividing up work between independent cores. Converting serial MATLAB applications to parallel MATLAB applications usually requires few code modifications and no programming in a low-level language. This tutorial will introduce MATLAB parallel processing tools, such as parfor, spmd, and distributed array types.

  • Compiling a working executable from C or Fortran source code can be a frustrating experience for new programmers. This “hands-on” tutorial will introduce the basic steps for compiling small- to medium-sized projects. Topics include working with multiple source files, header files, and external libraries, options for debugging and optimization, and automation using Make and Autotools (configure). For simplicity, we will only cover the build process for systems with a Linux operating system (such as the BU Shared Computing Cluster). Familiarity with the Linux command line is assumed. Familiarity with C or Fortran will be helpful, but is not required.

  • SPSS (Statistical Package for the Social Sciences) is a widely used program for analyzing data. SPSS uses windows and dialog boxes to manipulate data and perform statistical analyses. This hands-on tutorial will introduce you to the basics of SPSS and will give you one hours’ practice using SPSS on Microsoft Windows. After completing this tutorial, you will be able to: enter data into SPSS, use SPSS to transform data, use SPSS to perform basic statistical analyses.

  • ImageJ is a popular open source tool for image analysis and processing. In this tutorial we will cover the use of ImageJ for basic image manipulation, writing ImageJ macros, and quantitative measurements of a fluorescent image. The details of different image file formats and using ImageJ in preparing and formatting images for publication will also be covered.

  • Our second session on OpenRefine will continue with Data Carpentry's OpenRefine lesson and will cover:

    + Examining numbers in OpenRefine
    + How to document data cleaning in OpenRefine
    + Applying scripts to our data sets
    + Exporting our work from OpenRefine

    Join us in Mugar Library's Estin Room (room 302) at 12:30. Space is limited. Attendees will need to bring their own laptop in order to fully participate and are highly encouraged to attend our first session (or have some familiarity with OpenRefine). Please arrive with OpenRefine already installed!

    Date: Oct. 5, 2017
    Location: Mugar Library Estin Room (302)
    Time: 12:30-1:30

    Register

  • Transform your writing using Pandoc and Markdown! In this workshop you'll learn the basics of writing in Markdown - a simple and powerful markdown language - and how to convert your text to html, pdfs, and more using Pandoc. Using these two tools you'll find a new freedom for writing by removing overhead software and working in simple plain text. In this lesson you'll learn:

    + The working principles for this writing methodology
    + The basics of Markdown
    + How to use Pandoc
    + A few command line basics

    Please arrive with Pandoc installed! Installation guides and "office hours" for assistance will be provided after registration.

    Join us in Mugar Library's Estin Room (room 302) at 11:00. Space is limited. Attendees will need to bring their own laptop in order to fully participate.

    Date: Oct. 12, 2017
    Location: Mugar Library Estin Room (302)
    Time: 11:00-12:00

    Register

  • Oct 19, 2017

    Jupyter Notebooks are probably one of the coolest things ever developed - if you're interested in research, coding, and sharing your work. With Jupyter Notebooks you can write code (both simple and complex), document as well as distribute your work, and post it online. In this lesson you'll learn:

    + Jupyter Notebook's features
    + How to launch a new notebook
    + How to execute code and write documentation
    + How to share your work with others

    Please arrive with Jupyter already installed! Installation guides and "office hours" for assistance will be provided after registration.

    Join us in Mugar Library's Estin Room (room 302) at 12:30. Space is limited. Attendees will need to bring their own laptop in order to fully participate.

    Date: Oct. 19, 2017
    Location: Mugar Library Estin Room (302)
    Time: 12:30-1:30

    Register

  • In this session, we will focus upon fundamental concepts and skills to begin using GIS software and online platforms in Digital Humanities. We will talk about GIS, and spatial data (concept, and format). We will explore different ways to collect spatial data and to convert spatial data into a GIS friendly version. A list of GIS online platforms and programs will be introduced which we can utilize in digital humanities and social science projects. We will look into some examples of GIS projects in digital humanities and explore the programs and platforms to create these projects.

  • The shell, or command line, is likely the most powerful (and intimidating) tool on your computer. It is probably the most underutilized too. This workshop is designed to help you "get to know your" shell. We will be using the Software Carpentry lesson "The Unix Shell" to learn:

    + What the shell is and why it exists
    + How to navigate files and directories
    + Using pipes and filters
    + How to find things

    **Note: If you're comfortable manipulating files, using grep, and writing simple scripts, this session is unlikely to benefit you.

    Installation guides and "office hours" for assistance will be provided after registration.

    Join us in Mugar Library's Estin Room (room 302) at 12:30. Space is limited. Attendees will need to bring their own laptop in order to fully participate.

    Date: Oct. 26, 2017
    Location: Mugar Library Estin Room (302)
    Time: 12:30-1:30

    Register

  • Downloading files from websites is a routine part of research today. However, too many researchers spend precious time clicking and downloading items one at a time. Wget is a command line tool researchers can use to automate downloading files from websites, archives, and other online sources. This session will use a mix of the Programming Historian lessons "Automated Downloading with Wget" and "Applied Archival Downloading with Wget" to help you learn:

    + What Wget is and its features
    + How to download files and folders
    + How to mirror a site
    + How to approach downloading archival materials

    Installation guides and "office hours" for assistance will be provided after registration.

    Join us in Mugar Library's Estin Room (room 302) at 12:30. Space is limited. Attendees will need to bring their own laptop in order to fully participate.

    Date: Nov. 2, 2017
    Location: Mugar Library Estin Room (302)
    Time: 12:30-1:30

    Register

  • Working with large data sets in numerous files requires rethinking how you approach your initial analysis. Using the Programming Historian lesson "Counting and Mining Research Data with Unix" this session will give you a few tools to analyze your data sets in a way that simply cannot be done using a spreadsheet program like Libre Office or Excel. In this session you will learn:

    + How to generate counts across files
    + How to use grep to mine data
    + How to conduct basic data transformations
    + Why you should properly manage your data

    Installation guides and "office hours" for assistance will be provided after registration.

    Join us in Mugar Library's Estin Room (room 302) at 12:30. Space is limited. Attendees will need to bring their own laptop in order to fully participate.

    Date: Nov. 9, 2017
    Location: Mugar Library Estin Room (302)
    Time: 12:30-1:30

    Register

  • Topic models hold power for answering questions about textual corpora at scale. All the same, getting started with topic modeling can be intimidating—and working with topic models without understanding the theory behind them can easily lead to misinterpretations. In this introductory session, we will discuss what topic models can do, how they work, their potential and limitations. We will share several examples of research projects and processes using topic models and work with participants to determine how they might frame their own research questions in ways that could be answered with topic modeling. The session will give participants a solid understanding of how topic modeling works, so that they can decide whether they want to go further with learning how to use topic models in their research.

  • If you are interested in setting up a free website that is easy to maintain and preservable you will want to attend this session. Using the Programming Historian's lesson "Building a static website with Jekyll and GitHub Pages" this session will provide you with the basic tools needed to build your own website. Participants will learn:

    + The benefits of a static website
    + How to build a local website with Jekyll
    + How to use GitHub pages
    + Some basic git commands

    Installation guides and "office hours" for assistance will be provided after registration.

    Join us in Mugar Library's Estin Room (room 302) at 12:30. Space is limited. Attendees will need to bring their own laptop in order to fully participate.

    Date: Nov. 16, 2017
    Location: Mugar Library Estin Room (302)
    Time: 12:30-1:30

    Register

Past News

  • There are many actions researchers can take to increase the openness and reproducibility of their work. Please join us for a workshop, hosted by the Center for Open Science, to learn easy, practical steps researchers can take to increase the reproducibility of their work. The workshop will be hands-on. Using example studies, attendees will actively participate in creating a reproducible project from start to finish.

    This workshop is aimed at graduate students, postdocs, and faculty across disciplines, who are engaged in quantitative research. The workshop does not require any specialized knowledge of programming. Participants will gain a foundation for incorporating reproducible, transparent practices into their current workflows.

    Attendees will need to bring their own laptop in order to fully participate.

    Date: Sept. 20, 2017
    Location: Mugar Library Estin Room (302)
    Time: 9:00-12:00

    Register

  • MATLAB (MATrix LABoratory) is a numerical computing environment developed by MathWorks, Inc. In short, MATLAB is a highly optimized interpreted programming language designed for intuitive and fast development of scientific computing software. This “hands-on” tutorial will introduce the MATLAB programming environment and the basic tools you will need to write your own MATLAB programs. Topics include matrix variables and operations, reading/writing data, plotting, loops, conditional statements, scripts, and functions. No prior programming experience in any language is required to attend this course.

  • This is a basic introduction to the essential features of Python. This tutorial includes a brief introduction to basic types (Integer, Float, String, and Boolean), if-statements, functions, lists, dictionaries, loops, and modules. We’ll look at some simple interactive tasks. After this tutorial you’ll be ready to explore all the amazing modules Python has to offer.

  • For those who are planning or who are currently conducting clinical or translational research, CTSI-sponsored open consultation sessions are held for study design and statistical analysis. Meet with Howard Cabral, MPH, PhD, SPH Biostatistics, Christine Chaisson, MPH, SPH Data Coordinating Center and Eric Jones, SPH Data Coordinating Center. Accommodations can be made for those unable to attend drop-in sessions. CRC researchers are encouraged to confirm anticipated attendance. Please contact Howard Cabral at hjcab@bu.edu with any questions. Drop-in sessions are held every Tuesday, from 11 am to 12 pm, room E747, Evans (E) Building.

  • In this hands-on session, participants will learn the basics of XML (eXtensible Markup Language) and semantic text encoding, and will be briefly introduced to commonly used encoding standards. We will discuss why you might want to encode text, and look at some tools that can help you visualize encoded text. Participants should bring laptops or tablets to work on.

  • Whether you are writing source code or a manuscript, keeping track of changes is a critial part of a successful project. Version control software, like Git, automates the process of backing up and annotating previous versions of your evolving projects. In conjunction with online hosting services like Github, it also greatly simplifies the logistical difficulties of working in parallel with collaborators. This “hands-on” tutorial will cover basic usage of the popular version control software Git and the online hosting service Github.

  • This tutorial will introduce the basics of Data Analysis with Python and its powerful libraries such as Pandas and Matplotlib. What you will learn: Importing and Exporting the data; Basic data processing, cleaning, and manipulation; Basic inferential statistical analysis; Data Visualization techniques. Prerequisite: basic familiarity with the Python environment or one of our Introduction to Python tutorials.

  • Perl is a powerful and versatile programming language that can be used for a wide variety of programming tasks, including, but not limited to, text/data processing, system administration, and Web applications. Combing elements of C, Unix shell scripting languages, as well as text-processing utilities such as sed and awk, Perl can be used for both large scale projects and for small applications. Some experience in a command line environment (e.g. Unix) is helpful, but the basics of Perl are simpler than those of other languages making it accessible to a new programmer. Attending our Introduction to Linux tutorial or equivalent background is recommended. Please remember to sign up for all four sessions to complete the tutorial.

  • Sept 15, 2017

    This tutorial is aimed at those who want to learn to read, write, and modify C++ code. Although previous programming experience in languages such as C, MATLAB, or Python would be helpful, it is not mandatory. In this tutorial series we will cover basic syntax, object-oriented programming concepts, and basic C++ language features. This is a hands-on tutorial and we will write, compile, and run some simple codes using the Code::Blocks integrated development environment. Please remember to sign up for all four sessions to complete the tutorial.

  • Sept 14, 2017

    This tutorial is the third in a series of R tutorials. It introduces basic R programming, debugging and optimization techniques and develops practices of proper and efficient R coding. It covers the following topics: if-else and switch statements; types of loops (for, while, repeat) and loop control statements (next, break); user functions and argument definitions; local and global variables&semi apply function family&semi sourcing, timing, compilation and debugging&semi code profiling and optimization.

  • Prerequisite: zero programming experience. We will go slowly so that everyone understands programming concepts, like loops and functions. This is an introduction to the essential features of Python. This tutorial includes a brief introduction to basic types (Integer, Float, String, and Boolean), if-statements, functions, lists, dictionaries, loops, and modules. We’ll look at some simple interactive tasks. After this tutorial you’ll be ready to explore all the amazing modules Python has to offer. This is a two part tutorial, so please sign up for both parts.

  • Sept 12, 2017

    This tutorial is primarily aimed at those who have some experience programming in another language, such as MATLAB, and want to learn to read, write, and modify C codes in a Unix environment. Although previous programming experience would be helpful, it is not mandatory. In this tutorial we will cover basic syntax, and write, compile, and run some simple codes. Basics of makefiles will also be covered. Please remember to sign up for all four sessions to complete the tutorial.

  • Sept 12, 2017

    R provides extensive and powerful graphics options that allow for the production of publication-ready, high quality diagrams, and plots. This tutorial introduces R graphics libraries and functions. After completing this tutorial you will: understand what to expect from R's graphics capabilities; be able to create, modify, and customize graphs and plots used in statistical analysis; find appropriate libraries, download, and use them for your visualization needs.

  • Communities are increasingly recognized as critical determinants of health and well-being. Commensurate with growing scholarship in the area, several leading health professional schools have developed academic concentrations in community health sciences. This emerging field includes a breadth of disciplines ranging from anthropology to sociology and an array of content foci ranging from social context and health behaviors to maternal and child health. Not only does this diverse field provide tremendous opportunities, but it also presents complex new challenges.

  • For those who are planning or who are currently conducting clinical or translational research, CTSI-sponsored open consultation sessions are held for study design and statistical analysis. Meet with Howard Cabral, MPH, PhD, SPH Biostatistics, Christine Chaisson, MPH, SPH Data Coordinating Center and Eric Jones, SPH Data Coordinating Center. Accommodations can be made for those unable to attend drop-in sessions. CRC researchers are encouraged to confirm anticipated attendance. Please contact Howard Cabral at hjcab@bu.edu with any questions. Drop-in sessions are held every Tuesday, from 11 am to 12 pm, room E747, Evans (E) Building.

  • Communities are increasingly recognized as critical determinants of health and well-being. Commensurate with growing scholarship in the area, several leading health professional schools have developed academic concentrations in community health sciences. This emerging field includes a breadth of disciplines ranging from anthropology to sociology and an array of content foci ranging from social context and health behaviors to maternal and child health. Not only does this diverse field provide tremendous opportunities, but it also presents complex new challenges. The Dean's Symposium will bring together faculty from across the nation to discuss the future of community health sciences, aiming to better map the remit and scope of the field. Featuring Robert M. Kaplan, Former Chief Science Officer, US Agency for Health Care Research and Quality; Research Director, Clinical Excellence Research Center, Stanford School of Medicine and Nina Wallerstein, Director, Center for Participatory Research, and Professor of Public Health, College of Population Health, University of New Mexico.

  • Sept 11, 2017

    R is the most powerful, rapidly developing, highly reliable, open source statistical language. It is widely used among statisticians for the development of statistical software and for data analysis. New features appear every few months. This tutorial introduces the R environment for statistical computing and will cover the following topics: operators and arithmetic operations; atomic types, variable rules and built-in constants; scalar and vector function overview; working with data (workspace setup as well as reading, creating, exploring, and saving data); working with R data types (vectors, matrices, lists, data frames); working with script files; installing and loading R extension packages and getting help; overview of functions for data analysis. After completing this tutorial you will: know the basics of the R environment, get a solid understanding of various data types and objects used in R, be able to create, load and analyze data, find appropriate functions and get necessary help and examples for these functions.

  • This tutorial will provide some more advanced techniques and common strategies used for interacting with the Shared Computing Cluster and its resources. The topics discussed during the tutorial include: customizing your environment, parallel computing on the SCC, jobs monitoring (CPU and memory usage), profiling programs for performance optimization, general optimization strategies. Recommended prerequisite: some prior experience with high performance computing or attendance of our Introduction to BU’s Shared Computing Cluster tutorial.

  • How did digital humanities start? What have humanities and social sciences practitioners done in it so far? What are they doing these days? In what ways is it useful to modern-day researchers in these fields? What venues exist for scholarly communication in DH? We will speak specifically to fields represented in the room. We will then introduce some basic activities that make up digital scholarship, applicable to both students and faculty-level researchers in the humanities and social sciences. Participants will leave with a list of suggested resources to follow up on if they wish.

  • An intensive, three day meeting utilizing the unique data from the Framingham Heart Study (FHS). The mission of this three-day workshop is to enable young clinical investigators and clinician scientists (MDs and PhDs) with the tools and resources to use epidemiological data to perform cardiovascular translational research, using data from FHS as an example. The meeting will be a combination of discussion sessions and hands on training. Lecture sessions will focus on key topic areas led by leaders in the field where they will discuss how they have accessed FHS data to answer career-building questions. The hands-on experience on the computer will include instruction on how to access FHS data, how to analyze the data, and how to evaluate the utility of the data for collaborations and grant applications. In addition, individual career counseling sessions will be offered by senior investigators.

  • David Liebesman Associate Professor of Philosophy & Linguistics University of Calgary (and former BU Assistant Professor of Philosophy) Abstract: Counting and measuring seem quite different: one requires enumerating distinct entities, while the other requires assigning a particular value along a conventional scale (e.g. weight). This seeming difference is reflected in most semantic accounts of number words ("three") and measure phrases ("three pounds"). I argue that when we examine the nature of counting with mixed fractions ("two and a half") we discover that our semantic accounts of counting and measuring should be continuous. I then propose a semantics of number words that incorporates this discovery.

  • This tutorial will give attendees a hands-on introduction to Linux. Topics covered will include a short history of Linux, logging in with ssh, the Bash shell and shell scripts, I/O redirection (pipes), file system navigation, and job control. Time permitting, attendees will edit, compile, and run a simple C program.

  • This tutorial will introduce Boston University’s Shared Computing Cluster (SCC) in Holyoke, MA. This Linux cluster has more than 6000 processors and over two petabytes of storage available for Research Computing by students and faculty on the Charles River and BUMC campuses. A very large number of software packages for programming, mathematics, data analysis, plotting, statistics, visualization, and domain-specific disciplines are available as well on the SCC. You will get a general overview of the SCC and the facility that houses it and then a hands-on introduction covering connecting to and using the SCC for new users. This tutorial will cover a few basic Linux commands but we strongly encourage people to also take our more extensive “Introduction to Linux” tutorial.

  • High-performance computing (HPC) or supercomputing (SC) refers to the practice of aggregating computing power in order to solve large problems in science, engineering, or business. In this tutorial, the following questions will be discussed: Why a computer cluster is necessary? What is the basic structure of a computer cluster? What resources does an HPC system provide? How to measure computer performance? What are the most powerful computers in the world? What scientific disciplines benefit from HPC? What is parallel computing? In particular, the nation-wide HPC resource XSEDE (eXtreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment) will be introduced. This tutorial will also guide you to other RCS tutorials being offered this semester that might be helpful to your particular study or research work.

  • For those who are planning or who are currently conducting clinical or translational research, CTSI-sponsored open consultation sessions are held for study design and statistical analysis. Meet with Howard Cabral, MPH, PhD, SPH Biostatistics, Christine Chaisson, MPH, SPH Data Coordinating Center and Eric Jones, SPH Data Coordinating Center. Accommodations can be made for those unable to attend drop-in sessions. CRC researchers are encouraged to confirm anticipated attendance. Please contact Howard Cabral at hjcab@bu.edu with any questions. Drop-in sessions are held every Tuesday, from 11 am to 12 pm, room E747, Evans (E) Building.

  • Allon Klein, PhD Assistant Professor of Systems Biology, Harvard University.

  • Do you need study design or statistical analysis help for a study plan, grant proposal or manuscript submission? The CTSI offers free help with study design and statistical analysis.

  • Do you need study design or statistical analysis help for a study plan, grant proposal or manuscript submission? The CTSI offers free help with study design and statistical analysis.

  • Do you need study design or statistical analysis help for a study plan, grant proposal or manuscript submission? The CTSI offers free help with study design and statistical analysis.

  • Statistical signal processing is an important area of research with extensive applications to many fields such as communications, radar/sonar, biomedical engineering, economic, and so on. This talk introduces some new contributions to statistical signal processing theory and several applications. The topics covered include optimal radar waveform design, detection of nonstationarity in space-time adaptive processing, complex parameter Rao test theorem and applications, Bayesian exponentially embedded family (EEF) rule for model order selection and its applications, and Brain Computer Interface.

  • Do you need study design or statistical analysis help for a study plan, grant proposal or manuscript submission? The CTSI offers free help with study design and statistical analysis.

  • This one hour webinar will give you the tools you need to create an effective discussion guide for focus groups and key informant interviews. You will gain an understanding of how to start from a general research question and develop it into a practical and organized questioning route so that you’ll get the answers you need. We will cover all phases of development from brainstorming, to phrasing and sequencing questions, to pilot testing. You will learn best practices so that your groups and interviews will be maximally informative. This will be an interactive webinar with multiple opportunities to ask questions of the presenter.

  • From Professor Rinner: "In this talk I will give an overview of privacy challenges in visual data. I will then present selected key achievements from our ten years' research in privacy-aware cameras. A key approach for privacy protection is to deteriorate the image quality of selected areas or entire frames. We have developed "e;cartooning" as an onboard protection method which requires low computational resources and keeps the utility of the protected video high. In another research thread we have investigated adaptive privacy filters which modify the strength of the deterioration based on the captured scenes. I will conclude the talk by demonstrating our TrustEYE, an embedded smart camera which performs onboard privacy filtering and secures all delivered data with dedicated hardware."

  • Do you need study design or statistical analysis help for a study plan, grant proposal or manuscript submission? The CTSI offers free help with study design and statistical analysis.

  • The Informatics for Integrating Biology with the Bedside data system (www.i2b2.org) integrates diverse clinical data into a de-identified, standards-based, longitudinal clinical data repository. BU-i2b2 has data dating back to 1999 and is connected to three national networks to facilitate national collaboration across more than 25 partner institutions.

  • Do you need study design or statistical analysis help for a study plan, grant proposal or manuscript submission? The CTSI offers free help with study design and statistical analysis.

  • IP scholars from across the country will share their research on patent examination and regulation and trade secret licensing.

  • Do you need study design or statistical analysis help for a study plan, grant proposal or manuscript submission? The CTSI offers free help with study design and statistical analysis.

  • Do you need study design or statistical analysis help for a study plan, grant proposal or manuscript submission? The CTSI offers free help with study design and statistical analysis.

  • The Boston Nutrition Obesity Research Center Annual Symposium and Poster Session will be on July 10, 2017. Speakers include Graham A. Colditz, James O. Hill, and Rudolph L. Leibel.

  • HPC Futures is a one day exploration of ideas and planning for future computational research at the Boston area universities, institutes, hospitals, libraries and companies. Future needs may be driven both by ambitious research goals, by increasing needs to work across traditional academic and institutional boundaries, by increasing interaction with national and international cyberinfrastructures and by technological advances such as IoT, cloud computing, deep learning, computer hardware advances and cybersecurity considerations. We examine these issues within a celebration of the most exciting and important research happening in the Boston area.

  • June 23, 2017

    This tutorial is primarily aimed at those who have some experience working in a Linux environment and programming in R. The topics covered in this tutorial: debugging and profiling R code, choosing the right functions to speed-up your code, parallelization techniques, tuning your code for faster performance on the SCC cluster.

  • The 16th Annual BU-CMD Symposium on Molecular Discovery: From Chemical Synthesis to Biological Applications will be held on June 23, 2017. Speakers include Professor Robert Langer (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Professor Frances H. Arnold (California Institute of Technology), Professor Benjamin List (Max-Planck-Institut), and Professor Dirk Trauner (New York University).

  • June 22, 2017

    This tutorial is the third in a series of R tutorials. It introduces basic R programming, debugging and optimization techniques and develops practices of proper and efficient R coding. It covers the following topics: if-else and switch statements; types of loops (for, while, repeat) and loop control statements (next, break); user functions and argument definitions; local and global variables&semi apply function family&semi sourcing, timing, compilation and debugging&semi code profiling and optimization.

  • June 21, 2017

    R provides extensive and powerful graphics options that allow for the production of publication-ready, high quality diagrams, and plots. This tutorial introduces R graphics libraries and functions. After completing this tutorial you will: understand what to expect from R's graphics capabilities; be able to create, modify, and customize graphs and plots used in statistical analysis; find appropriate libraries, download, and use them for your visualization needs.

  • Whether you are writing source code or a manuscript, keeping track of changes is a critial part of a successful project. Version control software, like Git, automates the process of backing up and annotating previous versions of your evolving projects. In conjunction with online hosting services like Github, it also greatly simplifies the logistical difficulties of working in parallel with collaborators. This “hands-on” tutorial will cover basic usage of the popular version control software Git and the online hosting service Github. Basic knowledge of a the Linux command line is assumed.

  • June 20, 2017

    R is the most powerful, rapidly developing, highly reliable, open source statistical language. It is widely used among statisticians for the development of statistical software and for data analysis. New features appear every few months. This tutorial introduces the R environment for statistical computing and will cover the following topics: operators and arithmetic operations; atomic types, variable rules and built-in constants; scalar and vector function overview; working with data (workspace setup as well as reading, creating, exploring, and saving data); working with R data types (vectors, matrices, lists, data frames); working with script files; installing and loading R extension packages and getting help; overview of functions for data analysis. After completing this tutorial you will: know the basics of the R environment, get a solid understanding of various data types and objects used in R, be able to create, load and analyze data, find appropriate functions and get necessary help and examples for these functions.

  • Compiling a working executable from C or Fortran source code can be a frustrating experience for new programmers. This “hands-on” tutorial will introduce the basic steps for compiling small- to medium-sized projects. Topics include working with multiple source files, header files, and external libraries, options for debugging and optimization, and automation using Make and Autotools (configure). For simplicity, we will only cover the build process for systems with a Linux operating system (such as the BU Shared Computing Cluster). Familiarity with the Linux command line is assumed. Familiarity with C or Fortran will be helpful, but is not required.

  • June 19, 2017

    This tutorial is aimed at those who want to learn to read, write, and modify C++ code. Although previous programming experience in languages such as C, MATLAB, or Python would be helpful, it is not mandatory. In this tutorial series we will cover basic syntax, object-oriented programming concepts, and basic C++ language features. This is a hands-on tutorial and we will write, compile, and run some simple codes using the Code::Blocks integrated development environment. Please remember to sign up for all four sessions to complete the tutorial.

  • MATLAB programs can be exceptionally fast if they are well-designed, and painfully slow if not. Fortunately, it does not take a professional programmer to write an efficient MATLAB program or to take advantage of multi-core processors and computer clusters. This tutorial will introduce (1) using MATLAB on the BU SCC, and (2) optimizing MATLAB codes. The first part will cover how to use the MATLAB platform remotely and how submitting batch jobs for MATLAB works. In the second part, some useful skills for removing unnecessary computation and optimizing memory usage will be introduced. The skills you learn should enable you to solve bigger problems faster using MATLAB.

  • The MATLAB Parallel Computing Toolbox allows you to write programs that leverage multi-core processors, GPUs, and computer clusters by dividing up work between independent cores. Converting serial MATLAB applications to parallel MATLAB applications usually requires few code modifications and no programming in a low-level language. This tutorial will introduce MATLAB parallel processing tools, such as parfor, spmd, and distributed array types.

  • This is a basic introduction to the essential features of Python. This tutorial includes a brief introduction to basic types (Integer, Float, String, and Boolean), if-statements, functions, lists, dictionaries, loops, and modules. We’ll look at some simple interactive tasks. After this tutorial you’ll be ready to explore all the amazing modules Python has to offer.

  • June 15, 2017

    This tutorial is primarily aimed at those who have some experience working in a Linux environment and programming in R. The topics covered in this tutorial: debugging and profiling R code, choosing the right functions to speed-up your code, parallelization techniques, tuning your code for faster performance on the SCC cluster.

  • This tutorial will provide some more advanced techniques and common strategies used for interacting with the Shared Computing Cluster and its resources. The topics discussed during the tutorial include: customizing your environment, parallel computing on the SCC, jobs monitoring (CPU and memory usage), profiling programs for performance optimization, general optimization strategies. Recommended prerequisite: some prior experience with high performance computing or attendance of our Introduction to BU’s Shared Computing Cluster tutorial.

  • We invite you to the CTSI Biostatistics, Epidemiology & Research Design (BERD) core seminars. Each month, the CTSI will introduce its faculty, clinicians, staff, and affiliates of the CTSI and engage in discussions geared specifically towards you, the BU research community. Join us and learn how the CTSI can help you.

  • June 14, 2017

    This tutorial is the third in a series of R tutorials. It introduces basic R programming, debugging and optimization techniques and develops practices of proper and efficient R coding. It covers the following topics: if-else and switch statements; types of loops (for, while, repeat) and loop control statements (next, break); user functions and argument definitions; local and global variables&semi apply function family&semi sourcing, timing, compilation and debugging&semi code profiling and optimization.

  • This tutorial will give attendees a hands-on introduction to Linux. Topics covered will include a short history of Linux, logging in with ssh, the Bash shell and shell scripts, I/O redirection (pipes), file system navigation, and job control. Time permitting, attendees will edit, compile, and run a simple C program.

  • Prerequisite: zero programming experience. We will go slowly so that everyone understands programming concepts, like loops and functions. This is an introduction to the essential features of Python. This tutorial includes a brief introduction to basic types (Integer, Float, String, and Boolean), if-statements, functions, lists, dictionaries, loops, and modules. We’ll look at some simple interactive tasks. After this tutorial you’ll be ready to explore all the amazing modules Python has to offer. This is a two part tutorial, so please sign up for both parts.

  • This tutorial will introduce Boston University’s Shared Computing Cluster (SCC) in Holyoke, MA. This Linux cluster has more than 6000 processors and over two petabytes of storage available for Research Computing by students and faculty on the Charles River and BUMC campuses. A very large number of software packages for programming, mathematics, data analysis, plotting, statistics, visualization, and domain-specific disciplines are available as well on the SCC. You will get a general overview of the SCC and the facility that houses it and then a hands-on introduction covering connecting to and using the SCC for new users. This tutorial will cover a few basic Linux commands but we strongly encourage people to also take our more extensive “Introduction to Linux” tutorial.

  • June 13, 2017

    R provides extensive and powerful graphics options that allow for the production of publication-ready, high quality diagrams, and plots. This tutorial introduces R graphics libraries and functions. After completing this tutorial you will: understand what to expect from R's graphics capabilities; be able to create, modify, and customize graphs and plots used in statistical analysis; find appropriate libraries, download, and use them for your visualization needs.

  • June 12, 2017

    R is the most powerful, rapidly developing, highly reliable, open source statistical language. It is widely used among statisticians for the development of statistical software and for data analysis. New features appear every few months. This tutorial introduces the R environment for statistical computing and will cover the following topics: operators and arithmetic operations; atomic types, variable rules and built-in constants; scalar and vector function overview; working with data (workspace setup as well as reading, creating, exploring, and saving data); working with R data types (vectors, matrices, lists, data frames); working with script files; installing and loading R extension packages and getting help; overview of functions for data analysis. After completing this tutorial you will: know the basics of the R environment, get a solid understanding of various data types and objects used in R, be able to create, load and analyze data, find appropriate functions and get necessary help and examples for these functions.

  • June 12, 2017

    Perl is a powerful and versatile programming language that can be used for a wide variety of programming tasks, including, but not limited to, text/data processing, system administration, and Web applications. Combing elements of C, Unix shell scripting languages, as well as text-processing utilities such as sed and awk, Perl can be used for both large scale projects and for small applications. Some experience in a command line environment (e.g. Unix) is helpful, but the basics of Perl are simpler than those of other languages making it accessible to a new programmer. Attending our Introduction to Linux tutorial or equivalent background is recommended. Please remember to sign up for all four sessions to complete the tutorial.

  • Autodesk Maya 2017 is a powerful state-of-the-art 3D modeling and animation software package. It has a wide variety of modeling, animation, special effects, and rendering tools. It has a customizable graphical user interface as well as a scripting language for optimal flexibility in problem solving and production. In this tutorial we will show you how to get started using Maya. We will teach you the basic workflow for modeling, creating and applying materials, animation, and rendering. We will also cover the basics of importing scientific geometric data and creating high quality renderings and animations from it. Ordinarily Maya is considered to have a steep learning curve, but in this tutorial we will present a workflow which will provide a sound foundation for pursuing more complex projects.

  • Perl is a powerful and versatile programming language that can be used for a wide variety of programming tasks, including, but not limited to, text/data processing, system administration, and Web applications. Combing elements of C, Unix shell scripting languages, as well as text-processing utilities such as sed and awk, Perl can be used for both large scale projects and for small applications. Some experience in a command line environment (e.g. Unix) is helpful, but the basics of Perl are simpler than those of other languages making it accessible to a new programmer. Attending our Introduction to Linux tutorial or equivalent background is recommended. Please remember to sign up for all four sessions to complete the tutorial.

  • The Principal Investigator (PI) holds ultimate responsibility for the design, conduct, and management of a research study which requires up-to-date skills and knowledge. Using International Conference on Harmonization Good Clinical Practice as the gold standard for the conduct of human research studies, this rigorous training for new and experienced clinical researchers who are interested in a refresher.

  • SAS (Statistical Analysis System) is one of the most powerful statistical packages available on any computer platform. This tutorial will introduce you to SAS on the desktop. After completing this tutorial, you will be able to: access SAS on Windows; create, edit, and save program files containing SAS commands; obtain printed output; create, run, and modify your own programs.

  • This is a basic introduction to the essential features of Python. This tutorial includes a brief introduction to basic types (Integer, Float, String, and Boolean), if-statements, functions, lists, dictionaries, loops, and modules. We’ll look at some simple interactive tasks. After this tutorial you’ll be ready to explore all the amazing modules Python has to offer.

  • MATLAB (MATrix LABoratory) is a numerical computing environment developed by MathWorks, Inc. In short, MATLAB is a highly optimized interpreted programming language designed for intuitive and fast development of scientific computing software. This “hands-on” tutorial will introduce the MATLAB programming environment and the basic tools you will need to write your own MATLAB programs. Topics include matrix variables and operations, reading/writing data, plotting, loops, conditional statements, scripts, and functions. No prior programming experience in any language is required to attend this course.

  • This tutorial will provide some more advanced techniques and common strategies used for interacting with the Shared Computing Cluster and its resources. The topics discussed during the tutorial include: customizing your environment, parallel computing on the SCC, jobs monitoring (CPU and memory usage), profiling programs for performance optimization, general optimization strategies. Recommended prerequisite: some prior experience with high performance computing or attendance of our Introduction to BU’s Shared Computing Cluster tutorial.

  • This tutorial will give attendees a hands-on introduction to Linux. Topics covered will include a short history of Linux, logging in with ssh, the Bash shell and shell scripts, I/O redirection (pipes), file system navigation, and job control. Time permitting, attendees will edit, compile, and run a simple C program.

  • This tutorial will introduce Boston University’s Shared Computing Cluster (SCC) in Holyoke, MA. This Linux cluster has more than 6000 processors and over two petabytes of storage available for Research Computing by students and faculty on the Charles River and BUMC campuses. A very large number of software packages for programming, mathematics, data analysis, plotting, statistics, visualization, and domain-specific disciplines are available as well on the SCC. You will get a general overview of the SCC and the facility that houses it and then a hands-on introduction covering connecting to and using the SCC for new users. This tutorial will cover a few basic Linux commands but we strongly encourage people to also take our more extensive “Introduction to Linux” tutorial.

  • For those who are planning or who are currently conducting clinical or translational research, CTSI-sponsored open consultation sessions are held for study design and statistical analysis. Meet with Howard Cabral, MPH, PhD, SPH Biostatistics, Christine Chaisson, MPH, SPH Data Coordinating Center and Eric Jones, SPH Data Coordinating Center. Accommodations can be made for those unable to attend drop-in sessions. CRC researchers are encouraged to confirm anticipated attendance. Please contact Howard Cabral at hjcab@bu.edu with any questions. Drop-in sessions are held every Tuesday, from 11 am to 12 pm, room E747, Evans (E) Building.

  • Combined drop-in sessions for help with research study design, statistical analysis, and REDCap. Drop-in sessions are held in the Mugar Library, 1st and 3rd Fridays, from 2 to 3 pm. Please contact Tasha Coughlin at tawatson@bu.edu with questions. LOCATION - Mugar Library, 771 Commonwealth Ave, Alcove 2.

  • REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture) is a secure web-based application for building and managing online surveys and databases for research. The REDCap Users Group meets on the 1st and 3rd Thursday of each month at 85 East Newton Street, Fuller Building-Room 922 from 1–3 pm. Please contact Tasha Coughlin at tawatson@bu.edu for more information.

  • For those who are planning or who are currently conducting clinical or translational research, CTSI-sponsored open consultation sessions are held for study design and statistical analysis. Meet with Howard Cabral, MPH, PhD, SPH Biostatistics, Christine Chaisson, MPH, SPH Data Coordinating Center and Eric Jones, SPH Data Coordinating Center. Accommodations can be made for those unable to attend drop-in sessions. CRC researchers are encouraged to confirm anticipated attendance. Please contact Howard Cabral at hjcab@bu.edu with any questions. Drop-in sessions are held every Tuesday, from 11 am to 12 pm, room E747, Evans (E) Building.

  • The Principal Investigator (PI) holds ultimate responsibility for the design, conduct, and management of a research study which requires up-to-date skills and knowledge. Using International Conference on Harmonization Good Clinical Practice as the gold standard for the conduct of human research studies, this rigorous training for new and experienced clinical researchers who are interested in a refresher. Note that tyhis training takes place over two half-days.

  • We invite you to the CTSI Biostatistics, Epidemiology & Research Design (BERD) core seminars. Each month, the CTSI will introduce its faculty, clinicians, staff, and affiliates of the CTSI and engage in discussions geared specifically towards you, the BU research community. Join us and learn how the CTSI can help you.

  • For those who are planning or who are currently conducting clinical or translational research, CTSI-sponsored open consultation sessions are held for study design and statistical analysis. Meet with Howard Cabral, MPH, PhD, SPH Biostatistics, Christine Chaisson, MPH, SPH Data Coordinating Center and Eric Jones, SPH Data Coordinating Center. Accommodations can be made for those unable to attend drop-in sessions. CRC researchers are encouraged to confirm anticipated attendance. Please contact Howard Cabral at hjcab@bu.edu with any questions. Drop-in sessions are held every Tuesday, from 11 am to 12 pm, room E747, Evans (E) Building.

  • Combined drop-in sessions for help with research study design, statistical analysis, and REDCap. Drop-in sessions are held in the Mugar Library, 1st and 3rd Fridays, from 2 to 3 pm. Please contact Tasha Coughlin at tawatson@bu.edu with questions. LOCATION - Mugar Library, 771 Commonwealth Ave, Alcove 2.

  • REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture) is a secure web-based application for building and managing online surveys and databases for research. The REDCap Users Group meets on the 1st and 3rd Thursday of each month at 85 East Newton Street, Fuller Building-Room 922 from 1–3 pm. Please contact Tasha Coughlin at tawatson@bu.edu for more information.

  • For those who are planning or who are currently conducting clinical or translational research, CTSI-sponsored open consultation sessions are held for study design and statistical analysis. Meet with Howard Cabral, MPH, PhD, SPH Biostatistics, Christine Chaisson, MPH, SPH Data Coordinating Center and Eric Jones, SPH Data Coordinating Center. Accommodations can be made for those unable to attend drop-in sessions. CRC researchers are encouraged to confirm anticipated attendance. Please contact Howard Cabral at hjcab@bu.edu with any questions. Drop-in sessions are held every Tuesday, from 11 am to 12 pm, room E747, Evans (E) Building.

  • One of the biggest challenges in translational research is the development of methods to predict phenotype—an organism’s physical characteristics—from what we know about the genome and environment. Unpacking phenotypic complexity will require the convergence of research across biology, computer science, medicine, engineering, and others. Attend this Research on Tap to learn what BU faculty are doing to unlock the mysteries of phenotype.

  • For those who are planning or who are currently conducting clinical or translational research, CTSI-sponsored open consultation sessions are held for study design and statistical analysis. Meet with Howard Cabral, MPH, PhD, SPH Biostatistics, Christine Chaisson, MPH, SPH Data Coordinating Center and Eric Jones, SPH Data Coordinating Center. Accommodations can be made for those unable to attend drop-in sessions. CRC researchers are encouraged to confirm anticipated attendance. Please contact Howard Cabral at hjcab@bu.edu with any questions. Drop-in sessions are held every Tuesday, from 11 am to 12 pm, room E747, Evans (E) Building.

  • Combined drop-in sessions for help with research study design, statistical analysis, and REDCap. Drop-in sessions are held in the Mugar Library, 1st and 3rd Fridays, from 2 to 3 pm. Please contact Tasha Coughlin at tawatson@bu.edu with questions. LOCATION - Mugar Library, 771 Commonwealth Ave, Alcove 2.

  • April 20, 2017

    REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture) is a secure web-based application for building and managing online surveys and databases for research. The REDCap Users Group meets on the 1st and 3rd Thursday of each month at 85 East Newton Street, Fuller Building-Room 922 from 1–3 pm. Please contact Tasha Coughlin at tawatson@bu.edu for more information.

  • We invite you to the CTSI Biostatistics, Epidemiology & Research Design (BERD) core seminars. Each month, the CTSI will introduce its faculty, clinicians, staff, and affiliates of the CTSI and engage in discussions geared specifically towards you, the BU research community. Join us and learn how the CTSI can help you.

  • For those who are planning or who are currently conducting clinical or translational research, CTSI-sponsored open consultation sessions are held for study design and statistical analysis. Meet with Howard Cabral, MPH, PhD, SPH Biostatistics, Christine Chaisson, MPH, SPH Data Coordinating Center and Eric Jones, SPH Data Coordinating Center. Accommodations can be made for those unable to attend drop-in sessions. CRC researchers are encouraged to confirm anticipated attendance. Please contact Howard Cabral at hjcab@bu.edu with any questions. Drop-in sessions are held every Tuesday, from 11 am to 12 pm, room E747, Evans (E) Building.

  • For those who are planning or who are currently conducting clinical or translational research, CTSI-sponsored open consultation sessions are held for study design and statistical analysis. Meet with Howard Cabral, MPH, PhD, SPH Biostatistics, Christine Chaisson, MPH, SPH Data Coordinating Center and Eric Jones, SPH Data Coordinating Center. Accommodations can be made for those unable to attend drop-in sessions. CRC researchers are encouraged to confirm anticipated attendance. Please contact Howard Cabral at hjcab@bu.edu with any questions. Drop-in sessions are held every Tuesday, from 11 am to 12 pm, room E747, Evans (E) Building.

  • Combined drop-in sessions for help with research study design, statistical analysis, and REDCap. Drop-in sessions are held in the Mugar Library, 1st and 3rd Fridays, from 2 to 3 pm. Please contact Tasha Coughlin at tawatson@bu.edu with questions. LOCATION - Mugar Library, 771 Commonwealth Ave, Alcove 2.

  • April 6, 2017

    REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture) is a secure web-based application for building and managing online surveys and databases for research. The REDCap Users Group meets on the 1st and 3rd Thursday of each month at 85 East Newton Street, Fuller Building-Room 922 from 1–3 pm. Please contact Tasha Coughlin at tawatson@bu.edu for more information.

  • In the past four decades, the United States more than quadrupled the size of its prison system. This change in penal policy had a wide range of unwanted and profound social costs. At this Research on Tap, BU faculty will discuss their work to understand the consequences of the U.S. prison system on social and economic insecurity, families, neighborhoods, health and healthcare, democratic institutions, and the quality of membership in American society.

  • For those who are planning or who are currently conducting clinical or translational research, CTSI-sponsored open consultation sessions are held for study design and statistical analysis. Meet with Howard Cabral, MPH, PhD, SPH Biostatistics, Christine Chaisson, MPH, SPH Data Coordinating Center and Eric Jones, SPH Data Coordinating Center. Accommodations can be made for those unable to attend drop-in sessions. CRC researchers are encouraged to confirm anticipated attendance. Please contact Howard Cabral at hjcab@bu.edu with any questions. Drop-in sessions are held every Tuesday, from 11 am to 12 pm, room E747, Evans (E) Building.

  • For those who are planning or who are currently conducting clinical or translational research, CTSI-sponsored open consultation sessions are held for study design and statistical analysis. Meet with Howard Cabral, MPH, PhD, SPH Biostatistics, Christine Chaisson, MPH, SPH Data Coordinating Center and Eric Jones, SPH Data Coordinating Center. Accommodations can be made for those unable to attend drop-in sessions. CRC researchers are encouraged to confirm anticipated attendance. Please contact Howard Cabral at hjcab@bu.edu with any questions. Drop-in sessions are held every Tuesday, from 11 am to 12 pm, room E747, Evans (E) Building.

  • Combined drop-in sessions for help with research study design, statistical analysis, and REDCap. Drop-in sessions are held in the Mugar Library, 1st and 3rd Fridays, from 2 to 3 pm. Please contact Tasha Coughlin at tawatson@bu.edu with questions. LOCATION - Mugar Library, 771 Commonwealth Ave, Alcove 2.

  • REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture) is a secure web-based application for building and managing online surveys and databases for research. The REDCap Users Group meets on the 1st and 3rd Thursday of each month at 85 East Newton Street, Fuller Building-Room 922 from 1–3 pm. Please contact Tasha Coughlin at tawatson@bu.edu for more information.

  • In the past four decades, the United States more than quadrupled the size of its prison system. This change in penal policy had a wide range of unwanted and profound social costs. At this Research on Tap, BU faculty will discuss their work to understand the consequences of the U.S. prison system on social and economic insecurity, families, neighborhoods, health and healthcare, democratic institutions, and the quality of membership in American society.

  • For those who are planning or who are currently conducting clinical or translational research, CTSI-sponsored open consultation sessions are held for study design and statistical analysis. Meet with Howard Cabral, MPH, PhD, SPH Biostatistics, Christine Chaisson, MPH, SPH Data Coordinating Center and Eric Jones, SPH Data Coordinating Center. Accommodations can be made for those unable to attend drop-in sessions. CRC researchers are encouraged to confirm anticipated attendance. Please contact Howard Cabral at hjcab@bu.edu with any questions. Drop-in sessions are held every Tuesday, from 11 am to 12 pm, room E747, Evans (E) Building.

  • We invite you to the CTSI Biostatistics, Epidemiology & Research Design (BERD) core seminars. Each month, the CTSI will introduce its faculty, clinicians, staff, and affiliates of the CTSI and engage in discussions geared specifically towards you, the BU research community. Join us and learn how the CTSI can help you.

  • For those who are planning or who are currently conducting clinical or translational research, CTSI-sponsored open consultation sessions are held for study design and statistical analysis. Meet with Howard Cabral, MPH, PhD, SPH Biostatistics, Christine Chaisson, MPH, SPH Data Coordinating Center and Eric Jones, SPH Data Coordinating Center. Accommodations can be made for those unable to attend drop-in sessions. CRC researchers are encouraged to confirm anticipated attendance. Please contact Howard Cabral at hjcab@bu.edu with any questions. Drop-in sessions are held every Tuesday, from 11 am to 12 pm, room E747, Evans (E) Building.

  • Combined drop-in sessions for help with research study design, statistical analysis, and REDCap. Drop-in sessions are held in the Mugar Library, 1st and 3rd Fridays, from 2 to 3 pm. Please contact Tasha Coughlin at tawatson@bu.edu with questions. LOCATION - Mugar Library, 771 Commonwealth Ave, Alcove 2.

  • REDCap (Research Electronic Data Capture) is a secure web-based application for building and managing online surveys and databases for research. The REDCap Users Group meets on the 1st and 3rd Thursday of each month at 85 East Newton Street, Fuller Building-Room 922 from 1–3 pm. Please contact Tasha Coughlin at tawatson@bu.edu for more information.

  • Materials science has enabled and driven technological advances for all of human history. Today, novel materials address society’s most pressing technological challenges and enable revolutionary scientific breakthroughs. This Research on Tap will showcase some of BU’s most impactful materials scientists and engineers who are making the world a better place for all its inhabitants by improving our understanding and control of materials at every scale.

  • Learn how to increase the credibility of your work through preregistration and Registered Reports. In this webinar, Chris Chambers (Professor, Cardiff University Brain Research Imaging Centre) will discuss the benefits that scientists gain from having work peer reviewed before results are known. David Mellor (Project Manager, Center for Open Science) will discuss how researchers can combine Registered Reports with the Preregistration Challenge using the tools on the Open Science Framework to support both. Intended audience: Researchers and scientists who are considering about would like to learn more about about preregistration or submitting an article as a Registered Report. By the end of the webinar, attendees will know what Registered Reports are, what problems they address, where they can be submitted, and how to use the Open Science Framework to create a preregistration.

  • For those who are planning or who are currently conducting clinical or translational research, CTSI-sponsored open consultation sessions are held for study design and statistical analysis. Meet with Howard Cabral, MPH, PhD, SPH Biostatistics, Christine Chaisson, MPH, SPH Data Coordinating Center and Eric Jones, SPH Data Coordinating Center. Accommodations can be made for those unable to attend drop-in sessions. CRC researchers are encouraged to confirm anticipated attendance. Please contact Howard Cabral at hjcab@bu.edu with any questions. Drop-in sessions are held every Tuesday, from 11 am to 12 pm, room E747, Evans (E) Building.

  • Combined drop-in sessions for help with research study design, statistical analysis, and REDCap. Drop-in sessions are held in the Mugar Library, 1st and 3rd Fridays, from 2 to 3 pm. Please contact Tasha Coughlin at tawatson@bu.edu with questions. LOCATION - Mugar Library, 771 Commonwealth Ave, Alcove 2.

  • The Principal Investigator (PI) holds ultimate responsibility for the design, conduct, and management of a research study which requires up-to-date skills and knowledge. Using International Conference on Harmonization Good Clinical Practice as the gold standard for the conduct of human research studies, this rigorous training for new and experienced clinical researchers who are interested in a refresher. Note that this training takes place over two half-days.

  • The session will feature BU faculty presenting their groups’ research that uses space probes, as well as both space- and ground-based telescopes, to explore the Earth’s cosmic environment, our Solar System, planets around other stars, gas clouds, galaxies, and black holes.

  • The Reproducibility Project : Cancer Biology, a large scale effort to explore reproducibility, has published the first five Replication Studies in eLife. In addition to the publication, the content of the research and reporting (data, analysis/figure scripts, additional laboratory notes, etc) was made open. In this webinar, you will hear about the steps taken by the team to utilize the OSF and the statistical program R to organize, integrate, and make open the content associated with each replication study. Presenters aer Alex Denis and Tim Errington.

  • This tutorial is a continuation of Introduction to C Programming, Part One (Hands‐on) described above. We strongly recommend that if you are interested in this tutorial, you also register for Parts One, Three, and Four.

  • This webinar is an introduction to using the Open Science Framework (OSF) - a free, open source web application built to help researchers manage their workflows. The OSF is part collaboration tool, part version control software, and part data archive. The OSF connects to popular tools researchers already use, like Dropbox, Box, Github and Mendeley, to streamline workflows and increase efficiency.

  • This tutorial will provide some more advanced techniques and common strategies used for interacting with the Shared Computing Cluster and its resources. The topics discussed during the tutorial include customizing your environment, parallel computing on the SCC, jobs monitoring (CPU and memory usage), profiling programs for performance optimization, and general optimization strategies.

  • This tutorial will provide some more advanced techniques and common strategies used for interacting with the Shared Computing Cluster and its resources. The topics discussed during the tutorial include customizing your environment, parallel computing on the SCC, jobs monitoring (CPU and memory usage), profiling programs for performance optimization, and general optimization strategies.

  • This tutorial will give attendees a hands-on introduction to Linux. Topics covered will include a short history of Linux, logging in with ssh, the Bash shell and shell scripts, I/O redirection (pipes), file system navigation, and job control. Time permitting, attendees will edit, compile, and run a simple C program.

  • This tutorial will introduce Boston University’s Shared Computing Cluster (SCC) in Holyoke, MA. This Linux cluster has more than 6000 processors and over two petabytes of storage available for Research Computing by students and faculty on the Charles River and BUMC campuses. A very large number of software packages for programming, mathematics, data analysis, plotting, statistics, visualization, and domain-specific disciplines are available as well on the SCC. You will get a general overview of the SCC and the facility that houses it and then a hands-on introduction covering connecting to and using the SCC for new users.

  • This tutorial will provide some more advanced techniques and common strategies used for interacting with the Shared Computing Cluster and its resources. The topics discussed during the tutorial include customizing your environment, parallel computing on the SCC, jobs monitoring (CPU and memory usage), profiling programs for performance optimization, and general optimization strategies.

  • This tutorial will introduce Boston University’s Shared Computing Cluster (SCC) in Holyoke, MA. This Linux cluster has more than 6000 processors and over two petabytes of storage available for Research Computing by students and faculty on the Charles River and BUMC campuses. A very large number of software packages for programming, mathematics, data analysis, plotting, statistics, visualization, and domain-specific disciplines are available as well on the SCC. You will get a general overview of the SCC and the facility that houses it and then a hands-on introduction covering connecting to and using the SCC for new users.

  • Whether you are writing source code or a manuscript, keeping track of changes is a critial part of a successful project. Version control software, like Git, automates the process of backing up and annotating previous versions of your evolving projects. In conjunction with online hosting services like Github, it also greatly simplifies the logistical difficulties of working in parallel with collaborators. This “hands-on” tutorial will cover basic usage of the popular version control software Git and the online hosting service Github.

  • This tutorial will give attendees a hands-on introduction to Linux. Topics covered will include a short history of Linux, logging in with ssh, the Bash shell and shell scripts, I/O redirection (pipes), file system navigation, and job control. Time permitting, attendees will edit, compile, and run a simple C program.

  • This tutorial will introduce Boston University’s Shared Computing Cluster (SCC) in Holyoke, MA. This Linux cluster has more than 6000 processors and over two petabytes of storage available for Research Computing by students and faculty on the Charles River and BUMC campuses. A very large number of software packages for programming, mathematics, data analysis, plotting, statistics, visualization, and domain-specific disciplines are available as well on the SCC. You will get a general overview of the SCC and the facility that houses it and then a hands-on introduction covering connecting to and using the SCC for new users.

  • Have a data question? Stop in to Mugar Library from 2:00-3:00 for office hours with the DCC.

  • This Research on Tap session will convene researchers from across BU who seek to understand the the roots of violence, help trauma victims recover, and provide advice on combatting terrorist activities and groups. RSVP

  • Have a data question? Stop in to Mugar Library from 2:00-3:00 for office hours with the DCC.

  • Have a data question? Stop in to Mugar Library from 2:00-3:00 for office hours with the DCC.

  • This Research on Tap session will bring together faculty from across BU who develop technology that directly impacts human health and function, who study technology’s impact on human behavior and social organizations, and who consider the implications of new technologies on privacy and security. RSVP

  • Have a data question? Stop in to Mugar Library from 2:00-3:00 for office hours with the DCC.

  • Join the BU Study Group for a session on Makefiles.

  • The Office of Research is hosting an Open Access Week event on Open Science at BU. Open Science at BU: Success Stories will be on Friday, October 28 from 2:00-3:30 in Barristers Hall (LAW, 765 Commonwealth Avenue). Be sure to register.

  • Join the BU Study Group for a session on Open Data.

  • Have a data question? Stop in to Mugar Library from 2:00-3:00 for office hours with the DCC.

  • This webinar covered how to mint a DOI for our data using CERN's Zenodo data repository. We looked at what is a Digital Object Identifier (DOI), who supports Zenodo and what it is, and how to use Zenodo to get a DOI.

  • This webinar covered the National Science Foundation's data management requirements for their grants. We discussed the background for the NSF's data management plan requirements, the different components required, and where to find more information.

  • Sept 22, 2016

    This webinar discussed the basics about citing data and why you should cite your data includings: why you should cite data; how to properly cite data; and how to make your data citable.

  • This webinar looked at how to write a generic a data management plan.