Recent news and happenings

Interview: Santoso’s Death and the Future of ISIS in Indonesia

By Arlene Brennan
July 26th, 2016 in Professor News.

CURA Director Robert W. Hefner was interviewed on July 19th on live television on Singapore’s Channel News Asia. The program, called “First Look Asia”, focused on the killing of Santoso (real name Abu Wardah), the most-wanted terrorist in Indonesia, who died in an anti-terrorist raid. Hefner addressed questions around whether Santoso’s death represents a turning point in the fight against terrorism and ISIS in Indonesia. Hefner suggests the event was a testimony to the skill and professionalism of the Indonesian police and anti-terror units, but said that, unfortunately, the war against ISIS still had a very long way to go.

Find out more about this story.

By Source, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=51108923

By Source, Fair use, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?curid=51108923

Catholics, Muslims and secularists in Quebec: Citizenships in tension in the aftermath of the Quiet Revolution

By Arlene Brennan
July 19th, 2016 in Blog, research abroad.

A two year project between the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies and CURA has resulted in a series of blog post articles on topics of “Global Migration and the New Cosmopolitanisms: Religion, Public Ethics, and Citizenship in Plural Societies”.

Find researcher Azeddine Hmimssa’s article on “Catholics, Muslims and secularists in Quebec: Citizenships in tension in the aftermath of the Quiet Revolution” on the University of Notre Dame’s blog Contending Modernities.

Here’s an excerpt from Azeddine’s article:

The introduction of a proposed “Charter of Quebec values” ​​by the Government of Quebec on September 10, 2013 was as a major event which can be considered part of a long process of secularization in Quebecois society, dating back to the so-called “Quiet Revolution” of the 1960s, which achieved its last success in the late 1990s by denominating schools based on languages (French versus English) rather than religion (Catholic versus Protestant). Throughout its history, Quebecois society has been strongly tied to the Catholic Church, which historically maintained a powerful presence in education, healthcare, and even political parties. In the wake of the “Quiet Revolution”, French Canadians, who represent the majority of the province’s Catholics, have become less religiously observant. At the same time, the Quebecois national movement that had its birth within a Catholic movement—“Action sociale catholique,” which was active between 1905 and 1962—has itself become increasingly secular.”

The un-Dutchable challenge of pluralism

By Arlene Brennan
July 13th, 2016 in Blog, research abroad.

A two year project between the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies and CURA has resulted in a series of blog post articles on topics of “Global Migration and the New Cosmopolitanisms: Religion, Public Ethics, and Citizenship in Plural Societies”.

Find researcher Ahmet Yukleyen’s article on “The Un-Dutchable challenge of pluralism” on the University of Notre Dame’s blog Contending Modernities.

Here’s an excerpt from Ahmet’s article:

“Every year on December 5th, tens of thousands of Dutch people paint their faces black, dress up in antique costume, and assume the persona of Zwarte Piet (“Black Pete”) to help Sinterklaas (St. Nicholas) distribute candy and presents to children throughout the Netherlands. In recent years, Dutch citizens of Caribbean ancestry have spoken out against the portrayal of Black Pete as a racist caricature. In early October of 2013, Quinsy Gario, a Curaçao-born Dutch performance artist, argued on TV that Black Pete perpetuates a stereotype of African people as second-class citizens in Dutch society. The following week, the mayor of Amsterdam met with residents who asked that Black Pete be removed from the city’s Sinterklaas parade. Most white Dutch reacted angrily to accusations that the Black Pete tradition is racist, and the character continues to be popular in society. According to a 2013 survey, 92% of the Dutch public do not perceive Black Pete as racist or associate him with slavery, and 91% are opposed to altering the character’s appearance.”

Struggling to mieux vivre ensemble: The sobering reality of France’s new plurality

By Arlene Brennan
June 28th, 2016 in Blog, research abroad.

A two year project between the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies and CURA has resulted in a series of blog post articles on topics of “Global Migration and the New Cosmopolitanisms: Religion, Public Ethics, and Citizenship in Plural Societies”.

Find researcher Carol Ferrara’s article on “Struggling to mieux vivre ensemble: The sobering reality of France’s new plurality” on the University of Notre Dame’s blog Contending Modernities.

An excerpt from the article:

2015 was a devastating year for France. At the end of my 15-month fieldwork research in December of 2014, the country was already dealing with an ongoing economic recession, a wildly unpopular president, and a fervent and growing far-right political party. Furthermore, social tensions surrounding Islam, laïcité, and immigration had been escalating over the past few decades, with same-sex marriage being added to the heated public debates in recent years. The Charlie Hebdo attacks of January 2015 took a heavy toll on the already vulnerable state of the country. But ensuing unifying events such as the Marche Republicane – the biggest rally (~3.7 million people nationwide) in France since the liberation in 1944 – helped France to pull together and brush off at least some of the dust.”

Los Angeles: A microcosm for national conversations on religion, public life and deep diversity

By Arlene Brennan
June 27th, 2016 in Blog.

A two year project between the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies and CURA has resulted in a series of blog post articles on topics of “Global Migration and the New Cosmopolitanisms: Religion, Public Ethics, and Citizenship in Plural Societies”.

Find researcher Ahmet Selim Tekelioglu’s article on “Los Angeles: A microcosm for national conversations on religion, public life and deep diversity” on the University of Notre Dame’s blog Contending Modernities.

An excerpt from the article:

“The intellectual enterprise of talking about multiculturalism and pluralist co-existence carries an inherent tension. On the one hand, the gap between theorizing and empirical research points to the need to embed ourselves in a dialectical understanding of both spheres. On the other hand, the field carries the exciting and yet traumatizing effects of a dynamically changing landscape, rendering long-term analysis difficult. The public debate often becomes overly focused on the day-to-day developments and makes co-imbricated realities all the more complex. Having experienced this difficulty during my fieldwork within the Muslim communities in Boston and the San Francisco Bay Area, where I spent considerable time among six Muslim communities, I wanted my research in Los Angeles to focus more exclusively on the wider narratives that defined the public conversation on religion in Southern California.”

The new western plurality and citizen co-existence

By Arlene Brennan
June 24th, 2016 in Blog, Professor News, research abroad.

A two year project between the Kroc Institute for International Peace Studies and CURA has resulted in a series of blog post articles on topics of “Global Migration and the New Cosmopolitanisms: Religion, Public Ethics, and Citizenship in Plural Societies”.

Find Director Bob Hefner’s article on “The new western plurality and citizen co-existence” on the University of Notre Dame’s blog Contending Modernities.

An excerpt from the article:

Two developments over the past generation have presented serious challenges to the ideals and practice of Western citizenship. The first has been an unprecedented expansion of migration to Western countries, including that from Muslim societies and the broader global south. It goes without saying that the migratory vectors of our age pass not just from south to north, but across countries of the developing world. But the late-modern march of humanity to Western lands is of such a scale and complexity that it has raised questions about existing models of pluralist citizenship—a challenge which has been exacerbated by its cultural timing. In the aftermath of the great secularist surges of the 1960s and 1970s, most Western European and North American countries had reached a new consensus on the place of religion in public life. But many new immigrants brought with them, or discovered in their new homelands, different ideas as to how and where to be religiously observant.”

New Working Paper on Modernity and Virtue

By Arlene Brennan
April 27th, 2016 in Events at CURA, Uncategorized.

Check out our paper series sponsored by a grant from the Henry Luce Foundation. Our new entry is from Professor James Laidlaw of Cambridge University. Laidlaw is a professor of social anthropology and this work is looking at how people can be both modern and virtuous. Click here to read his new work.

New Paper about The “ISIS Bandwagon”

By Arlene Brennan
March 22nd, 2016 in Events at CURA, Professor News.

Professor Joel Day submitted a new working paper on terrorist cells that pledge allegiance to ISIS. What are their motivations? Read his interesting paper as part of our series.

Listen to our latest talk: Young Egyptians in Search of Love and Marriage

By Arlene Brennan
February 10th, 2016 in Events at CURA.

Amidst heavy snow showers this past Monday, Dr. Samuli Schielke of the Zentrum Moderner Orient spoke on the subject of how money, morals and destiny come together when young Egyptians Search for Love and Marriage. If you missed the talk but are interested in the topic, you can stream it hereIMG_0132IMG_0133

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Hefner Speaks in Indonesia

By Arlene Brennan
February 8th, 2016 in Conference, Professor News, research abroad.

Check out the Pardee School news item on Director Bob Hefner’s most recent trip to Indonesia. Hefner Speaks in Indonesia