Todd Solomon, Ph.D.

Clinical Neuropsychology Fellow

Email: tsolom@bu.edu
Location: 72 E. concord Street, Robinson Complex, Suite 7800

Background:

Dr. Solomon completed his bachelor’s degree at St. Lawrence University and earned his PhD from New York University in the Department of Applied Psychology with a specialty in Clinical Neuropsychology. While at NYU, Dr. Solomon undertook clinical training at NYU School of Medicine’s Aging and Dementia Center, Cornell Weill’s Dept. of Neurology and Columbia University’s Comprehensive Epilepsy Center. He completed his clinical internship at The Memory Clinic with a specialty in the neuropsychology of aging and dementia. In 2013, he joined the department of Neurology at Boston University School of Medicine as a postdoctoral fellow in clinical neuropsychology. He is a member of the BU Alzheimer’s Disease Center (ADC) and the Center for Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE) and continues to evaluate patients clinically.

Research Interests:

Dr. Solomon’s current research focuses on developing and evaluating neuropsychological instruments for the clinical screening of Alzheimer’s disease, Mild Cognitive Impairment and other dementia’s using computer and tablet based evaluations. He is also interested in the application and utility of neuropsychological screening instruments for dementia in primary care settings. Dr. Solomon has also completed work relating to the neurocognitive deficits related to HIV and substance abuse. He is mentored by Dr. Andrew Budson, Dr. Bob Stern and Dr. Ann McKee and was formally mentored by Dr. Perry Halkitis.

CTE Center Role:

Dr. Solomon is responsible for collecting data through clinical interviews with family members and other caregivers of deceased athletes who donate their brains to the center. By evaluating their medical, psychiatric and neurological history, a better understanding of potential risk factors, clinical course of disease and clinicopathologic correlations are being developed.

ADC Role:

Dr. Solomon is a member of the ADC’s clinical Core. He is responsible for evaluating and presenting neuropsychological data associated with all clinical evaluations at the ADC’s weekly consensus meeting as well as participating in the consensus diagnosis of center patients.

Awards/Memberships:

As part of his fellowship, Dr. Solomon was awarded the NIH T32 National Research Service Award. While completing his graduate training, Dr. Solomon received an NIH TL1 fellowship in Clinical and Translational Research. He also received the NYU Department of Applied Psychology Outstanding Research Award and the Doctoral Student Teaching Excellence Award. He was nominated for the 2013 Steinhardt School Outstanding Dissertation Award and received the APA’s National Psychologist Trainee Credentialing Scholarship.

Publications:

Solomon, T.M., Debrois, G., Budson A.E., Mirkovic, N., Murphy, C., & Solomon, P.R. (in press). Correlational Analysis of Five Commonly Used Measures of Cognitive Functioning and Mental Status: An Update. American Journal of Alzheimer’s disease & Other Disorders.

Solomon, T.M., Vassey, E., Budson, A. (in press). Ask the experts: Alzheimer’s disease: Screening & Diagnosis. London: Future Science Group.

Kupprat, S. A., Halkitis, P. N., Pérez-Figueroa, R., Solomon, T. M., Ashman, T., Kingdon, M. J., & Levy, M. D. (2013). Age-and education-matched comparison of aging HIV+ men who have sex with men to general population on common neuropsychological assessments. Journal of health psychology, 1359105313509844.

Solomon, T.M., & Halkitis, P.N. (2008). Cognitive Executive Functioning in Relation to HIV Medication Adherence among Gay, Bisexual, and Other Men who have Sex with Men. Aids & Behavior, 12(1) 66-78.

Homer, B.D., Solomon, T.M., Moeller, R. W., Macia, A., DeRaleau, L. & Halkitis, P.N. (2008) Methamphetamine Abuse and Impairment of Social Functioning: A Review of the Underlying Neurophysiological Causes and Behavioral Implications. Psychological Bulletin, 134(2) 301-310.

Gallo, D. A., Shahid, K.R., Olson, M.A., Solomon, T.M., Schacter, D.L., & Budson, A.E. (2006). Overdependence on degraded gist memory in Alzheimer’s disease: Evidence from the DRM blocking effect. Neuropsychology, 20(6), 625-32.