Comm Ave Babies

There is one thing that never fails to grab my attention on Comm Ave—babies. As I walk back-and-forth along BU’s mile-and-a-half stretch, this is the one thing that always seems to catch my eye. I find myself intentionally changing my walking or running route, just so I can get a closer look at the newborn, or toddler playing on the playground. Yes it is true, I have baby fever.

memoir

There is one thing that never fails to grab my attention on Comm Ave—babies. As I walk back-and-forth along BU’s mile-and-a-half stretch, this is the one thing that always seems to catch my eye. I find myself intentionally changing my walking or running route, just so I can get a closer look at the newborn, or toddler playing on the playground. Yes it is true, I have baby fever. Usually this is a title saved for women who are married, older than 19, or(women who) want to start a family. Needless to say, I do not have any of these symptoms for baby fever, but that is no excuse. When I see a baby on Comm Ave, I just smile to myself, in awe of their cuteness and cuddliness. Just to clarify, and to reassure my mother that I am not crazy, I do not want a baby of my own right now. I have other things on my mind besides babies 24/7.Instead, I just have a general love for little babes.

The greatest thing about these toddlers that rule Comm Ave is the kind of transportation they cruise in—we’re talking fancy strollers, baby backpacks, leashes and the like. Have you ever watched a baby try to run? They can’t—their little baby legs get all bunched up in their little baby jeans. Transportation via Mom and Dad is essential. However, babies often get stuck doing whatever their ‘rents’ want to do. I once saw a Mom rollerblading her baby uphill in a stroller. Is this legal? This baby must’ve gone for the ride of his life.

Surprisingly enough, this rollerblading, stroller-pushing mother on Comm Ave is only one of many wild baby rides I have witnessed. Every other day, this fall, I ran into a giant baby stroller, capable of holding fifty kids! While in actuality it only holds approximately six kids, the idea of it is still absurd. This monstrous device takes up an entire sidewalk—three rows of two, fully furnished with seatbelts, and a guardrail to make sure no babies escape. The ridiculousness of this thing drives me over the edge—too many babies at once! They all look extraordinarily adorable, but I wonder if they like sharing a stroller with so many fellow babes. As always, the happiness of these kids is what I find most important.

However, as I was walking back from class one day, my thoughts about babies being unhappy sharing a stroller were silenced. Just as I passed our school of management on my left, I noticed the crazy stroller ahead of me. My pace was decently fast, so I was going to pass the stroller in about two seconds. As I became neck-to-neck with the front row of the stroller, I saw one lone kid sitting at the head of it. His arms were spread wide, head titled back and looking up at the sky. (and) I could hear him yelling with excitement, “woohoooo!” This kid was having the time of his life. The wind was blowing his little baby hair all around, and he was livingon top of the world, as little kids should.

Babies really do live in a dream world. They don’t have to walk anywhere and people push them around or carry them constantly. It is a simple life. However, on Comm Ave, they are so out of place. I suppose that is what makes me absurdly excited when I see them, though. Against the landscape of disheveled college students and business-clad workmen, babies are a sharp contrast. They open their eyes and arms wide to take the world in, interested and fascinated by everything. They exude happiness and share it with the people around them. A happy baby makes a happy Andie.