Program Requirements

4 credits

This course is designed to help students communicate through audio, still images and moving pictures. We will study how films and photographs of various kinds communicate ideas, tell stories, and convey artistic expression. Students will then be given many opportunities to demonstrate their own grasp of fundaments of communication and storytelling through images, sounds and montage. The aim of this course is not simply to reinforce existing rules but rather to test the validity of those norms. Accordingly, students will be asked both to employ and to violate conventions.

4 credits

Required of all undergraduate students in Film & Television. An introduction to the art and craft of storytelling through the moving image. Particular emphasis will be given to writing short scripts. Topics covered include character development and narrative structure as it applies to shorts, features and episodic television.

And one of the following:

4 credits

Understanding Film will introduce students to key aesthetic aspects of film. Students will explore a range of styles and genres in film, including narrative and non-fiction forms, and dominant and alternative styles. Students will also study a variety of historical examples of theses different styles that illustrate the expressive possibilities of image and sound. Finally, students will learn to analyze and write about these formal elements, viewing both complete films and individual sequences.

4 credits

In this course we will examine the ways in which industrial factors and communication policies have shaped the medium that sits in 99% of U.S. homes. We will begin by examining television's roots in radio. The remainder of the course will be broken down into three stages of television history advanced by Rogers, Epstein and Reeves (2002). The first category is TVI- the period of three-network dominance. The next stage, TVII, is characterized by the rise of cable television and the decentering of the three networks. We will conclude the course by considering the current stage of television- TV III- in which the era of "on demand" has further destabilized traditional notions of content, audiences, producers, scheduling and technologies. In addition to tracing this development historically and thematically, we will confront it critically, analyzing the connections between power and money in the medium of television.

Additional Studies Requirement

Students who choose to take both FT 303 AND FT 250 do NOT need to select this additional studies course.

FOREIGN CINEMA STUDIES [Prereq: FT 250 (formerly FT360)]

If you take FT250 (but not FT303): Choose one film studies course with an international focus.*

4 credits

Surveys important and influential films from India, Japan, mainland China, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and elsewhere in East Asia from the 1950s to the present, taking in the work of such directors as Satyajit Ray, Ozu, Mizoguchi, Kurosawa, Zhang Yimou, Tsai Ming-liang, and Wong Kar-wai. The course is designed to make students familiar with foundational styles of realism and fantasy in Asian film and with ways Asian films address changes and evolution in Asian culture and society. The course should help students understand certain traditions in Asian film, and prepare them to engage critically with the ever burgeoning, new, and compelling filmmaking that comes from this part of the world.

4 credits

Subjects vary with the instructor. Directors discussed include Carl Dreyer, Satyajit Ray, Sergei Eisenstein, V. I. Pudovkin, Jean Renoir, Rene Clair, Andrzej Wajda, Jean-Luc Godard, Michelangelo Antonioni, Federico Fellini, Ingmar Bergman, Akira Kurosawa, Bernardo Bertolucci, and Luis Buñuel.

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

4 credits

This course traces the major discourses that have developed around the Dogme'95 movement. The major focus of this class is to study the work, vision, influences and contribution of Lars Von Trier to the New Scandinavian Cinema and its assorted practitioners. We will attempt to perceive and critique Von Trier's vision as a site for understanding cultural dynamics of European and American Societies. The course is organized chronologically to structure and present the development of both Trier's work and evolvement of the Dogme 95' movement. Some of the readings are assigned around those concerns.

4 credits

TELEVISION STUDIES [Prereq: FT 303]

If you take FT303 (but not FT250): Choose one designated TV studies course.*

4 credits

This course description is currently under construction.

4 credits

Course examines the extraordinary explosion of talent and creativity in live television's early days. It covers writers such as Paddy Chayefsky and Rod Serling, personalities like Edward R. Murrow, entertainers Sid Caesar, Milton Berle, Groucho Marx, Gertrude Berg, and Lucille Ball, live political broadcasts and blacklisting, and most significantly the great anthology series like Philco Television Playhouse, Studio One, Playhouse 90 which presented great and original American teleplays "Marty", "Requiem for a Heavyweight", "Patterns", "The Comedian", "The Defenders", and many more. Also covered are the great early TV directors John Frankenheimer, Alfred Hitchcock, Delbert Mann and actors who began their careers in television like Paul Newman, Ed Begley, and James Dean. We also look at the quiz show scandals and unique series like "The Twilight Zone." These live television shows (seen by kinescope) are of major importance in understanding the history of television.

4 credits

The American television situation comedy has been an enormously popular and powerful art form. This course traces the growth of the sitcom genre from the beginnings in the early 1950's up to the present time and analyzes how American life has been influenced by it. We look at how sitcoms affected popular perception of working class, race, ethnicity, idealized family life and then the growth of different family structures, fantasy and war. We study how sitcoms initially portrayed women and then the emerging changes in response to the feminist movement. We analyze Norman Lear's series which talked about the real things Americans were saying but in the privacy of their homes and the revolution that his series created. Finally we examine anti-family satire and take a close look at contemporary single life, both straight and gay.

4 credits

See the Department of Film and Televison for specifics.

4 credits

Surveys the history of television drama from its "live" beginnings in the 1950s to contemporary taped and filmed series, mini-series, and specials. The critical evaluation of such forms as sitcoms, soap operas, and regularly scheduled dramatic series from the perspective of the producer, writer, and director. Lectures, screenings, writing reviews, and discussions.

4 credits

Using series like The Sopranos, Weeds, and Breaking Bad as case studies, this course will examine the current state of cable TV with regard to industry, "quality," genres, auteurs, and the so-called "post-network" era. Students will approach these cable series with a critical eye as they work to connect industry, political economy, and government regulation to issues of social class, television hierarchies, and artistry. Students will also emerge from the course with a thorough understanding of how to perform television-focused research and analysis.

Program Electives (choose five)

FILM & TV STUDIES

Complete list available here

4 credits

This class will view and discuss romantic comedies and domestic melodramas made in Hollywood in the 1930's and 1940's. these films were some of the most popular and culturally significant of their time, involving many of the era's best screenwriters and directors and most prominent stars. The films set standards for dialogue writing, rich characterization, film performance and story structure.

4 credits

Subjects vary with the instructor. Directors discussed include D. W. Griffith, Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, King Vidor, Frank Borzage, Victor Fleming, Howard Hawks, Frank Capra, Alfred Hitchcock, John Ford, John Huston, Elia Kazan, George Cukor, Orson Welles, Robert Altman, John Cassavetes, and Woody Allen.

4 credits

4 credits

See the Department of Film and Televison for specifics.

4 credits

Details are available from the department of Film and Television. Topics and instructor vary each semester. Recent topics have included the films of John Cassavetes, Mike Leigh, and Rainer Fassbinder; the Blacklist; Low Brow Comedy.

4 credits

Surveys the history of the documentary and the changes brought about by the advent of television. Examines the outlook for the documentary idea in national and international markets. Periodic highlighting of special areas such as the portrayal of war, historical events, drama-documentary, and propaganda. Students develop critical and professional skills. Lectures, screenings, discussions.

4 credits

Surveys the history of television drama from its "live" beginnings in the 1950s to contemporary taped and filmed series, mini-series, and specials. The critical evaluation of such forms as sitcoms, soap operas, and regularly scheduled dramatic series from the perspective of the producer, writer, and director. Lectures, screenings, writing reviews, and discussions.

4 credits

Holocaust on Film examines the aesthetics of filmic texts which place the experience of the Holocaust at the center of their investigation.

MANAGEMENT/PRODUCING

4 credits

A survey of current business trends in the motion picture industry. Focuses on script development; studio structure; agents, attorneys, and contracts; independent filmmaking; and distribution.

4 credits

This course description is currently under construction.

4 credits

Introduces students to the tools and techniques used to produce multi-platform content. Students learn multimedia concepts, elements, and production to extend the brands of properties and to attract new audiences. Training in the use of computer-based hardware and software for multimedia creation. 4 cr. Fall/spring

4 credits

Any film- even a very short one- requires the making of thousands of decisions. How long do we shoot? How many mouths do we feed? How much will the props cost? This course offers systems for arriving at intelligent answers to these myriad questions. In covering logistics of getting a media production made, the course addressed how to catalog all the practical considerations that go into a production, how to schedule a shoot, how to budget a production and how to plan for distribution of the final product.

4 credits

The responsibilities that television and multi-platform content managers face. Research, programming, revenue, regulatory issues and ethics are all explored. Lectures, readings, case studies, and visits from professionals develop the student's understanding of a variety of managerial functions and the challenges these functions entail. 4 cr. Fall/spring

4 credits

Course takes the student through the process of creating a fictional program or film. The course covers comedy and drame series and movies-of -the week from development through production and post-production. The student learns the complexities of the industry, the layers of decision makers to be dealt with, the place of agents, the nature of negotiation, and the fundamentals of hiring crews, scheduling and budgeting. 4cr, 2nd sem.

4 credits

Examines the important role played by television in child development and culture, with special reference to the provision and content of programming for children of different ages, from preschool to adolescence.

4 credits

Topics and instructor vary each semester. Recent topics have included Television Production Hothouse and the Avid Film Composer.

WRITING [PREREQ: FT310]

4 credits

Writing the feature-length narrative film; creation of characters, narrative outline; writing the first draft of an original screenplay.

4 credits

Writing an original (second) feature-length screenplay (a first draft and set of revisions required). Further study of dramatic structure: tone and rhythm.

4 credits

Deals with the process and techniques of writing a dramatic series for commercial network and cable television. Students will select a current prime-time drama, develop A, B, and (possibly) C stories for an episode, and complete a Writer's Draft and polished First Draft, suitable for a Writer Portfolio. Lectures will include the life of a working television writer, one-hour story, structure, genres, and character development. We will view and analyze TV series from the past and present, and focus on proper drama script format, character development and voice.

4 credits

Prereq FT 512 or FT 522. Explores the development and creation of the Television Series Pilot. Each student will pitch a concept, write a treatment and a finished pilot script for an original series, either comedy or drama. Emphasis on premise, story structure, characterization and originality. Lectures, screenings, script readings, written assignments and critiques. 4 cr. 2nd sem.

4 credits

Intense writing workshop learning how to write professional sitcom scripts. Elements of character, dramatic story structure, how comedy is created, how scenes build and progress a story, formal story outlines, dialogue, the business of sitcom writing, pitching, arc, comedic premise are analyzed. The class becomes a sitcom writing team for a current hit series and writes an original class spec script to understand the process of group writing employed on most sitcoms. Also, students write their own personal spec scripts with individual conferences with the professor.

4 credits

The student will write a first-draft screenplay and two sets of revisions. In addition to participating in weekly discussions on aspects of screenwriting that are tailored to student needs, each student will complete and revise a full length motion-picture screenplay. 4cr. 1st sem.

4 credits

See the Department of Film and Televison for specifics.

PRODUCTION

4 credits

Covers practical application of film production, including script writing, production management, production, and post-production techniques. Theory and practice of digital production and non-linear post production. Short projects using digital video. Development of ideas and visual creation in a variety of genres.

4 credits

An intensive course in all the fundamental aspects of motion picture production. Students learn to use cameras, sound recording equipment and editing software and then apply these skills to several short productions. The course emphasizes the language of visual storytelling and the creative interplay of sound and image.

4 credits

Intermediate motion picture production with an emphasis on narrative storytelling, high definition cinematography, sync-sound location recording, and multi-track editing. Students develop, produce, direct, shoot, record and edit medium-length productions that are of film festival quality, and which can be incorporated into highlight and demo reels.

4 credits

This is an honors thesis class for undergraduates who have taken Production II as well as other high-level production classes, such as Directing, Cinematography, Sound Design, Motion Picture Editing, etc. Students apply to the class as either as producers, directors, cinematographers, editors, sound designers and production designers. Directors submit scripts for consideration. The production faculty then selects eight directors, based on the scripts and each candidate's previous work. Faculty then selects the producers, cinematographers, editors, sound designers, and production designers based on their previous production work and their ability to work as members of a team. The class forms production teams to make eight thesis- quality films that can compete with the best student films in America. Maximum running time for each film is fifteen minutes.

4 credits

A comprehensive technical examination of the role of sound as an emotional motivator and major storytelling component in both fiction and nonfiction films. Covers location sound recording, acoustic theory, track building, foley and dialog replacement, and mix preparation, as well as music editing and composition. Introduces a variety of postproduction pathways and technologies, including current digital innovations in the field and in audio postproduction, and provides an ongoing workshop for solving editing and track building problems.

4 credits

This course teaches all aspects of video post production including window dubbing, rough cuts, A/B editing, non-linear editing, digital graphics, digital sound, and the integration of all of these processes and technologies that apply to the postproduction completion of video projects. Familiarity with Macintosh computers is desirable. Experience with video timecode editing is a necessity.

4 credits

Undergraduate Prerequisites: COM FT 325 and COM FT 353; a 3.0 COM GPA Graduate Prerequisites: COM FT 707 and COM FT 727; a 3.2 COM GPA This is a class that operates as a student-run, client-driven production company. Projects include PSA's and web videos for local, national, and international non- profits. GPA of 3.0 or higher. 4 credits only.

4 credits

Course presents the requisite strategies, processes, technology, and skills training to successfully create live multi-camera productions. Emphasizes the roles and responsibilities of the director and producer. Intended outcome is for students to demonstrate proficiency in the academic, practical, and professional components established for the course. 4 cr, either sem.

4 credits

Students learn all aspects of directing, with particular emphasis given to script analysis and working with actors. The director's involvement in blocking action, composing shots, managing the production process and editing are also covered. Acting experience is helpful but not required.

4 credits

An intensive combination of lecture, demonstration, and hands-on work in lighting. Film and video systems, from the camera to the transfer, are explained, explored, and used. Guest lecturers and field trips to production facilities and shooting locations are included. 4 cr, either sem.

4 credits

This course is designed to develop skills necessary for producing long-form documentaries. There is an emphasis on exploring new, more engaging forms of storytelling and a broad range of stylistic approaches. It covers the entire process: finding a topic, developing a story structure, conceiving a style, shooting, editing, and post-production. Students develop their own ideas and form small groups to produce them.

4 credits

This course explores the aesthetic and technical parameters of the short film format, with the goal of celebrating Short Film, as a genre in and of itself. 4cr. either sem.

4 credits

See the Department of Film and Televison for specifics.

4 credits

Topics and instructors vary each semester. Details are available from the Department of Film and Television. Recent offerings have included Writing Episodic Drama.

4 credits

This practicum, designed for advanced film and television production students, focuses on the highly specialized filmmaking techniques used for the narrative documentary; that is, character-driven films about real people. The course also explores this tradition's rich legacy: from the Russians of the 1920s, through the CV movement of the 1960s, and on to the present day host of new films spawned by digital filmmaking technology.Course Prerequisites: FT 402 B+ or Better. Or by permission of Instructor.

4 credits

This course description is currently under construction.

4 credits

Based on a fundamental knowledge of technical and creative procedures of film production, this course pays deeper attention to important elements of cinematography such as composition, raw stock, sensitometry, lighting, movement, colors, and space. Emphasis is on a conscious usage of pictorial elements in the picture-building process.

GENERAL

4 credits

Develops the director's knowledge and understanding of actors --the "human equipment" of filmmaking--through direct acting experience. Students learn the language and tools of the craft through sensory exercises, improvisation, text analysis, and scene study.

Var credits

Individual projects; opportunity for advanced students who have completed a major portion of their degree requirements to engage in-depth tutorial study with specific faculty in an area not normally covered by regular curriculum offerings.

Var credits

Opportunity for students to gain professional experience at television and radio stations, film and video production houses, and other media institutions. Responsibilities vary. Availability depends on market needs.

Var credits

Opportunity for students to gain professional experience at television and radio stations, film and video production houses, and other media institutions. Responsibilities vary. Availability depends on market needs.

2 credits

This course description is currently under construction.

2 credits

This course description is currently under construction.