Spring 2018

The Department of Classical Studies offers courses in Classical Civilization, Latin, Ancient Greek and Modern Greek.

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*May be used to fulfill the Humanities Divisional Studies Requirement*

CAS CL101 Classical Civilization: World of Greece
Why and how did ancient Greek culture produce such remarkable writers, artists, and politicians who still today expand the horizons of human possibility, educate the imagination, refine moral intelligence, and enrich the stuff of the human spirit? Studying select masterpieces of epic, history, drama, art, and philosophy we will strive to become better critics of the ancient Greeks and, through them, better critics of ourselves.
MWF 11:15-12:05
, Nikolaev

CAS CL102 Classical Civilization: World of Rome
In this course, we will get to know the politicians, poets, heroes, and gods that shaped Rome’s cultural identity and left an indelible mark on Western Civilization. We will examine features of Roman daily life including: politics, religion, oratory, theater, philosophy, and even gladiators. By piecing together the literary, artistic, and archaeological evidence, we will reconstruct the World of Rome and identify key points of contact with our own culture.
TR 9:30-10:45, Čulík-Baird

CAS CL213 Greek and Roman Mythology 

A general introduction to myths of the ancient world and the special quality of thinking associated with myth making.  The course will focus on Greek myth in particular, but from a comparative perspective, looking at the myths of many early and non-Western cultures, exploring not only shared understandings, but also what made Greek myth different.  How did the distinctive way that the Greeks told their stories point the way to the habits of mind we associate with Western civilization and thought?
MWF 12:20-1:10, Henderson

CAS CL224 Greek Drama in Translation
The history and development of ancient Greek theater; study of important plays in the genres of tragedy, comedy, and satyr drama by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Aristophanes, and Menander. Cannot be taken for credit in addition to CAS CL 324. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.
TR 12:30-1:45, Esposito

CAS CL303 The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire
The causes and consequences of the decline and fall of the Roman Empire. Topics include Romans and barbarians; the rise and spread of Christianity; Constantine the Great; the death of classic paganism; theories of decline; the grand strategy of the Roman Empire; monasticism; the emergence of Byzantium and Constantinople; the origins of Islam; and the transformation of classical art, literature, and thought and their influence on Christianity.
TR 11:00-12:15, Samons

CAS CL305 Topics in Myth
This course may be repeated for credit as topics change. Topic for Spring 2017: Dionysus:Myth, rituals, origins of Greek drama, the Theater of Dionysus, reading and discussion of selected tragedies and comedies in translation, models of performance for the modern stage.
TR 11:00-12:15, Ruck

CAS CL322 Roman History
Introduction to the political, social, and economic history of Rome from the foundation of the city through the fall of the western empire. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.
MWF 11:15-12:05, Varhelyi

CAS CL325 Greek Tragedy and Film
Explores Greek tragic myth’s afterlife, both directly and obliquely, in cinema and in the modern literature spawning cinema: how certain Greek tragic myths have come to life as film and how “non-mythic” stories have acquired a mythic power in literary and cinematic form. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. Also offered as CAS CI378 and COM CI378.
TR 9:30-10:45, Golder

CAS CL406 Advanced Topics in Classical Civilization Prereq: Junior standing and two courses in classical civilization, or consent of the instructor
Topic for Spring 18: Close examination of literary and philosophical texts from the ancient world and modern psychology that address the question of what constitutes a good life and a good community. Themes include: friendship, self-care, love, altruism, happiness, and mental health.
MWF 10:10-11:00, Varhelyi

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*May be used to fulfill the CAS Language Requirement*

CAS CL162 Ancient Greek 2 Prereq: CAS CL 161
Ancient Greek is the original language of European literature, history, medicine, law, and science.  It continues to influence English and many other languages spoken today through terms like “democracy,” “geology,” and “megabytes.”  Discover the fascinating roots of modern Western thought, literature, and society through this introduction to ancient Greek.
TR 9:30-10:45, Esposito

CAS CL262 Ancient Greek 4: Homer Prereq: CAS CL 261 or equivalent.
Reading of selections from the Iliad or Odyssey.
TR 9:30-10:45, Staff

CAS CL391/461 Greek Seminar Prereq: CAS CL 262 or equivalent.
Intensive study of selected major authors. Topic for Spring 2018: Tragedy: The Motif of the Hero’s Marriage. Euripides’ Herakles, Sophocles’ Trachiniae, Euripides’ Hippolytus. Commonalities of theme and significance for the message of tragedy. Euripides’ Bacchae. Relevance of the motif to Dionysian ritual and religion. Also offered as CL 461.
TR 2:00-3:15, Ruck

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*May be used to fulfill the CAS Language Requirement*

CAS CL112 Beginning Latin 2. Prereq: CL111
The goal of first-year Latin is to provide you with an introduction to the fundamentals of Latin vocabulary, syntax, and grammar in order to prepare you for reading “real” Latin texts from antiquity. By the end of the second semester you should be able to read unedited passages of classical Latin.
A1: MW 10:10-11:00 F 10:10-11:55, Staff
B1: MW 12:20-1:10 F 12:20-2:05, Larash

CAS CL212 Intermediate Latin 4: Verse. Prereq: CAS CL211.
Reading of selections from Latin poetry. Authors read may include Catullus, Ovid, and Vergil.
A1: MWF 2:30-3:20, Uden
B1: TR 12:30-1:45, Staff

CAS CL351 Latin Seminar Prereq: CAS CL212 or equivalent
Intensive study of selected major authors. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Topic for Spring 18: Catullus. Students read selections of Catullus, the most “modern” of ancient poets. His poetry ranges from short, raunchy invective to themes of romance and literary criticism, and also includes longer poems on personal and mythological topics. Also offered as CL451 A1.
TR 12:30-1:45, Kronenberg

CAS CL451 Latin Seminar
A1:
Intensive study of selected major authors. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Topic for Spring 18: Catullus. Students read selections of Catullus, the most “modern” of ancient poets. His poetry ranges from short, raunchy invective to themes of romance and literary criticism, and also includes longer poems on personal and mythological topics. Also offered as CL351 A1.
TR 12:30-1:45, Kronenberg

B1: Advanced-level Latin seminar emphasizing close reading and literary analysis. Changing topics explore a variety of texts linked by chronology, genre, or theme. Topic for Spring 18: A reading course in Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura, with close attention to theme and style. Examination of Vergilian imitations of Lucretius and of English translations of DRN from the Renaissance to the present. Also offered as CL 502.
MWF 10:10-11:00, Scully

CAS CL502 Advanced Latin Seminar Prereq: CL351 or consent of the instructor
Advanced-level Latin seminar emphasizing close reading and literary analysis. Changing topics explore a variety of texts linked by chronology, genre, or theme. Topic for Spring 18: A reading course in Lucretius’ De Rerum Natura, with close attention to theme and style. Examination of Vergilian imitations of Lucretius and of English translations of DRN from the Renaissance to the present. Also offered as CL451 B1.
MWF 10:10-11:00, Scully

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*May be used to fulfill the CAS Language Requirement*

CAS CG112 Beginning Modern Greek 2 Prereq: CAS CG111 or equivalent.
Second semester. For beginners only. Review of grammar and syntax of modern Greek, reading in both prose and poetry, intensive oral practice.
MW 10:10-11:00 F 10:10-11:55, Polychroniou

CAS CG212 Intermediate Modern Greek 4 Prereq: CAS CG211 or equivalent.
Fourth semester. Discussion in Greek on everyday themes. Development of reading skills through the analysis of contemporary texts. Analysis of contrasting modes of expression and their influence on separate national cultures in Greek and in English.
MWF 12:20-1:10, Polychroniou

CAS CG357/CI378 Modern Greek Culture and Film
Introduction to Greek cultural, social, historical, political, economic, and religious issues through a range of films that have reflected and shaped contemporary Greek society. Entertainment, education, popular culture, propaganda, and identity- and nation-building practices as reflected in Greek cinema. Also offered as CAS CI 378.
MW 2:30-3:20 F 2:30-4:15, Polychroniou

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For questions, email the Department of Classical Studies at classics@bu.edu

Mosaic from the Mausoleum of Galla Placidia (Ravenna, Italy), accessed through ARTSTOR.