Spring 2014

The Department of Classical Studies offers courses in Classical Civilization, Latin, ancient Greek, and modern Greek.

Graduate Courses

CAS CL 396/596 Early Christian Greek Literature
Prereq: one 300-level ancient Greek course or equivalent. Introduction to the reading and interpretation of important works of early Christian literature (1st –6th centuries) in Greek, for students of classics (esp. Greek), theology, and related historical disciplines. The focus is on language, literary form, relation to ‘classical’ literature, and historical contexts. Topics vary. Also offered as CAS CL 596. Holmberg, M 6:00-9:00.

CAS CL 461/502 B1 Advanced Greek Seminar
Prereq: one 300-level Greek seminar or equivalent.
This course is a survey of archaic Greek lyric poetry (choral lyric, monody, elegy, and iambus). Reading of a wide-ranging selection of poetry (including Sappho, Solon, Archilochus, and Pindar) and discussion of style, dialects, meter, and context of these poems. Nikolaev, M/W/F 2:00-3:00.

CAS CL 451/502 A1 Advanced Latin Seminar
Prereq: two 300-level Latin seminars or equivalent. Topic: Lucretius andDe Rerum Natura. Scully, T/R 9:30-11:00.

CL521 Survey of Latin Literature I
Historical survey from archaic Latin through Republican literature; introduction to classical scholarship. For advanced students wishing to increase their language skills through extensive reading. Vasaly, R 3:30-6:30.

CAS CL 560 Studies in Ancient Greek History
Athens in the Fifth Century.  Athenian imperialism and democracy developed together between the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars.  This seminar will treat several of the historical and historiographical problems in this crucial but poorly documented period.  Topics covered will include the creation of the Delian League, Athens’ imperial financial system, the biographical tradition about Pericles (from the comedians and Thucydides through Plutarch), the development of the imperial bureaucracy, and the origins of the Peloponnesian War.  Advanced knowledge of Greek or permission of the instructor required. Samons, T 3:30-6:30.

CL791 Greek Seminar: Euripides and the Invention of Fiction. Helen and selections from other “romantic” tragedies composed by Euripides after 415.  Aristophanes’ response to Euripidean “realism” in Women at the Thesmophoria and Frogs.  Contemporary mythological comedy.  Impact on the development of fourth-century comedy and the romantic novel, with readings from Menander, Xenophon of Ephesus, and Longus.  Group project on issues in studying fragmentary drama. M, 3:00-6:00.

Courses in Classical Civilization

*All courses under this heading are taught in English and may be used to fulfill the Humanities Divisional Studies Requirement.*

CAS CL 101 Classical Civilization: The Glory of Greece
Greek antiquity viewed as fact and myth in Western tradition; Mycenaean Greece and emergence of the heroic mind; worldview of the Archaic Age; fifth century and classicism; breakdown of the city-state, coalescence of oriental and Greek cultures, and growth of the Hellenistic monarchies. Nikolaev, M/W/F 11:00-12:00

CAS CL 102 Classical Civilization: The Grandeur of Rome
The Roman Republic and Empire became the foundation on which Europe would develop its political systems, languages, literatures, art, architecture, and religion. This course explores how the Romans built an empire from modest beginnings that extended from the Atlantic Ocean to the Balkans, and developed innovations in everything from poetry to technology that it then bequeathed to later times.  A study of the Roman world, wherever possible through direct translation of the ancient originals.  Uden, T/Th 11:00-12:30

 

CAS CL 213 Greek and Roman Mythology
A general introduction to the myths of the ancient classical world, with particular regard to the patterns of experience, both religious and psychological, from which they evolved. Ruck, M/W/F 2:00-3:00.

CAS CL 216: Greek and Roman Religion
Survey of ancient Greek and Roman religions and their development from earliest beginnings to the eclipse of paganism. Theories and practices of these religions, comparisons with other religions, and relationships to Judaism and Christianity. Cannot be taken for credit in addition to CAS CL 317. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. Varhelyi, M/W/F 1:00-2:00.

CAS CL 222 Roman History
Introduction to the political, social, and economic history of Rome from the foundation of the city through the fall of the western empire. Cannot be taken for credit in addition to CAS CL 322. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. Varhelyi, M/W/F 12:00-1:00

CAS CL 224 Greek Drama in Translation
 We will look at the history and development of ancient Greek drama with particular focus on Athenian Tragedy and plays by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides.  We will study the richness of the plays themselves and consider how these myths of old spoke to the pressing questions of Athenian government and society in the heyday of Athenian democracy. Cannot be taken for credit in addition to CAS CL 324. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. Esposito

CAS CL229 Roman Comedy (in translation)
*Texts are in English* In this class, we will read a selection of Roman Comedies, discuss dominant themes, characters, and devices, consider the practical elements involved in staging a play, reflect on issues of adaptation, and explore Roman Comedy’s influence on later artists, from Shakespeare to Moliere to Sondheim. The class will culminate in an actual performance of a Roman Comedy. Cannot be taken for credit in addition to CAS CL 329. Klein, M/W/F 10:00-11:00

CAS CL 325 Greek Tragedy and Film
This course explores Greek tragic myth’s afterlife in cinema: how certain Greek tragic myths have come to life as film and also how “non-mythic” stories have acquired a mythic power in cinematic form. It looks at both Greek tragedy and cinema as embodying in some essential way a habit of mind, the human search for meaning, that takes the form of seeing in darkness. In cinema, this Greek metaphor of tragic vision has become the medium. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS. Golder, T/TH 9:30-11:00.

CAS CL 406 Advanced Topic in Classical Civilization
Prereq: CL 213 or consent of instructor. This seminar examines the seven surviving tragedies of Sophocles (and relevant fragmentary plays) in the context of the Athenian empire and democracy. We will investigate how this dramatist differs from his fellow tragedians (Aeschylus and Euripides) and also from the philosophies of Plato and Aristotle. In short, we will try to discover Sophocles’ vision(s) of the human condition. Esposito, T/TH 11:00-12:30.

CAS CL 560 Studies in Ancient Greek History
Athens in the Fifth Century.  Athenian imperialism and democracy developed together between the Persian and Peloponnesian Wars.  This seminar will treat several of the historical and historiographical problems in this crucial but poorly documented period.  Topics covered will include the creation of the Delian League, Athens’ imperial financial system, the biographical tradition about Pericles (from the comedians and Thucydides through Plutarch), the development of the imperial bureaucracy, and the origins of the Peloponnesian War.  Advanced knowledge of Greek or permission of the instructor required. Samons, T 3:30-6:30

 

Courses in Ancient Greek

*MAY be used to fulfill the CAS Language Requirement*

CAS CL 162 Beginning Greek 2
Prereq: CAS CL 161 or equivalent. Further study of ancient Greek grammar, forms, and vocabulary. Henderson M 10:00-11:00, W/F 9:30-11:00

CAS CL 262 Intermediate Greek 2  (Homer)
Prereq: CAS CL 261 or equivalent. Reading of selections from the Iliad or Odyssey. Scully, T/R 12:30- 2:00

CAS CL 396 Early Christian Greek Literature
Prereq: one 300-level ancient Greek course or equivalent. Introduction to the reading and interpretation of important works of early Christian literature (1st –6th centuries) in Greek, for students of classics (esp. Greek), theology, and related historical disciplines. The focus is on language, literary form, relation to ‘classical’ literature, and historical contexts. Topics vary. Also offered as CAS CL 596. Holmberg, M 6:00-9:00

CAS CL 461 Advanced Greek Seminar
Prereq: one 300-level Greek seminar or equivalent. This course is a survey of archaic Greek lyric poetry (choral lyric, monody, elegy, and iambus). Reading of a wide-ranging selection of poetry (including Sappho, Solon, Archilochus, and Pindar) and discussion of style, dialects, meter, and context of these poems. Nikolaev, M/W/F 2:00-3:00.

Courses in Latin

*MAY be used to fulfill the CAS Language Requirement*

CAS CL 112 Beginning Latin
Prereq: CASCL111 or equivalent. Part 2 of the Beginning Latin curriculum: further study of Latin grammar, forms, and vocabulary. This semester, we will finish the second half of our textbook and begin reading “real” unedited passages of classical Latin.. A1 Section: Staff, M 11-12, W/F 10:30-12:00. B1 Section: Klein: M/W 1:00-2:00, F 1:00-3:00

CAS CL 212 Readings in Latin Poetry
Prereq: CAS CL 211 or equivalent. Reading of selections from Latin poetry. Authors read may include Catullus, Ovid, and Vergil.A1 section: Ruck, M/W/F 10:00-11:00. B1 section: Haase, T/Th 12:30-2:00

CAS CL 351 Latin Seminar
Prereq: CAS CL 212 or equivalent.
Ovid Before Exile. Which of Ovid’s poems were controversial enough to earn him the anger of the emperor and a one-way ticket to the Black Sea in exile? Answer: all of them. Controversial selections from Ovid’s pre-exilic poetry: the Heroides (Letters from Heroines), the Amores, the Ars Amatoria (The Art of Love), and the Metamorphoses. Intensive study of selected major authors. Topics change each semester. May be repeated for credit. Johnson, T/Th 3:30 -5:00

CAS CL 451 Advanced Latin Seminar
Prereq: two 300-level Latin seminars or equivalent. Topic: Lucretius and De Rerum Natura. Scully, T/R 9:30-11:00

CAS CL 521 Survey of Latin Literature I
Historical survey from archaic Latin through Republican literature; introduction to classical scholarship. For advanced students wishing to increase their language skills through extensive reading. Vasaly, Th 3:30-6:30

Courses in Modern Greek

*MAY be used to fulfill the CAS Language Requirement*

Modern Greek Courses – may be used to fulfill all language requirements

CG 112 Beginning Modern Greek 2:
Prereq:  CG 111 or equivalent.   Review of grammar and syntax of Modern Greek. Reading prose and poetry. Intensive oral practice. A series of stories from ancient Greek mythology (Twelve Greek Gods) written in simple language; a film related to the stories will be shown.  Polychroniou. M/W 10:00-11:00, F 10:00-12:00.

CG 212 Intermediate Modern Greek 2:
Prereq:  CG 211 or equivalent.  Discussions in Modern Greek related to everyday themes. Development of reading skills through the analysis of contemporary texts. A series of stories from ancient Greek mythology (Ήρωες και  Μύθοι) written in simple language. Polychroniou. M/W/F 12:00-1:00.

CG 350 The Modern Greek Short Story:
Prereq:  CG 212 or equivalent.  A study of Greek short fiction through films from its beginnings to the present with emphasis on its historical context and cultural ideologies. Exposure to Modern Greek history and literature through films and documentaries related to the work of Michalis Karagatsis, Nicholas Gage, Pinelopi Delta,  Giannis Ritsos,  Nikos Kavvadias,  Kiki Dimoula, Kostas Karyotakis, Maria Polidouri, Kostas Taktsis, Stratis Myrivilis  and others. Entertainment, education, and mass culture as identity- and nation-building practice will be discussed. Conducted in Greek. Polychroniou . M/W/F 2:00-3:00.