CIMS Courses

Fall 2020

CAS CI 101, History of Global Cinema 1: Origins through 1950s

Leland Monk

M 2:30 p.m. – 5:15 p.m. (screening), W 2:30 p.m. – 4:15 p.m. (lecture), F 2:30 p.m. – 3:20 p.m. OR F 3:35 p.m. – 4:25 p.m. (discussion)

This course provides an overview of film history in a number of different national traditions, from the origins of film through the 1950s. It covers the emergence of the key international film movements, alongside the economic and historical conditions that inform them. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness, Critical Thinking.

CAS CI 200, Introduction to Film & Media Aesthetics

Jonathan Foltz

M 6:30 p.m. – 9:15 p.m. and T 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m. (lecture), R 12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m. (discussion)

This course will provide an overview of fundamental critical concepts for the analysis and understanding of aesthetic form in film, television and digital media. We will cover key concepts of formal composition (e.g. editing, mise-en-scène, cinematography, narrative structure, televisual flow, beat structure, digital compositing, sound perspective, and more) over a diverse set of media texts. Students will learn foundational skills in the analysis appropriate to film, television and other moving-image media. How do these media create meanings through their form? How are problems of perspective, character, desire, and memory represented in audio-visual terms? How have these aesthetic strategies shifted with developments in technology? Works by Ingmar Bergman, Agnès Varda, Orson Welles, Kelly Reichardt, Alfred Hitchcock, Alex Garland, Buster Keaton, Stanley Kubrick, Robert Bresson, David Lynch and others. Weekly screenings.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Digital/Multimedia Expression.

CAS CI 260 A1, Modern Japanese Culture in Cinema (in English translation)

Sarah Frederick

TR 12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

Japanese film from the silent era to contemporary animation, with attention to the intersection of cinematic and cultural analysis and genres such as yakuza movies. Directors studied may include Ozu, Kurosawa, Mizoguchi, and Miyazaki Hayao.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

CAS CI 269 A1, Representations of the Holocaust in Literature and Film

Nancy Harrowitz

TR 11:00 a.m. – 12:15 p.m.

How can we understand the impact of the Holocaust and its ongoing legacies? Holocaust representation in literature, film and memorials, including discussions of bystander complicity and societal responsibilities, testimonial and fictive works by Wiesel and Levi, documentaries and feature films.

This course fulfills a single unit in the following BU Hub areas: Historical Consciousness, Ethical Reasoning.

CAS CI 352 A1, Rebels With a Cause

Leland Monk

TR 3:30 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.

This course examines the work of two filmmakers whose work engages in social critique: Nicholas Ray who, working within the Hollywood studio system of the 1950s, made films about youth culture critical of the patriarchal American family; and Lucretia Martel, an Argentinian director working today whose brilliant films critique the entitled complacency of the bourgeois classes and the history of colonial oppression. Readings in thematically related literature (e.g. Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye with Ray’s Rebel Without a Cause, Isabel Allende’s The House of the Spirits with Martel’s films). Weekly screenings.

This course fulfills the auteur requirement.

CAS CI 365 A1, Modern Korean Culture through Cinema (in English translation)

Yoon Sun Yang

TR 9:30 a.m. – 10:45 a.m.

Exploring Korean cinema focusing on the themes of violence and redemption. What ethical, aesthetic, and historical implications can we draw from various cinematic depictions of violence? What might be ethical ways to visualize others’ traumatic experiences?

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Ethical Reasoning, Critical Thinking.

CAS CI 380 A1, Gender and Identity in Contemporary Middle Eastern Film

Roberta Micallef

T 3:30 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.

An exploration of representations of gender and identity in contemporary Middle Eastern films by male and female directors reflecting on the impact of modernization, globalization, war and trauma through different visual genres.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Digital/Multimedia Expression.

CAS CI 386 A1, Fascism and the Holocaust in Italy

Nancy Harrowitz

TR 2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m. (lecture), T 3:30 p.m. – 6:15 p.m. (discussion)

The Fascist regime and the Holocaust in Italy: how the civic status of Italian Jews changed from the beginnings of discrimination against them to deportations of 1943, posing larger questions about bigotry and racism, and the role of bystander complicity.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness.

CAS CI 390 A1, Cinema-Monde: Mapping French Film

Jennifer Cazenave

TR 12:30 p.m. – 1:45 p.m.

Spanning from the silent era to the present-day, this course reframes the key movements of French cinema through the lens of transnational histories spanning from colonization to wars of independence to May ’68 to 9/11.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy, Creativity/Innovation.

CAS CI 480, Modern Chinese Literature & Film

Petrus Liu

A seminar on the major works of modern Chinese literature and cinema from the May Fourth period to the present, with a focus on close reading and visual analysis.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Global Citizenship and Intercultural Literacy.

CAS CI 512 A1, Film and Media Theory

Jonathan Foltz

TR 2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

Introduction to film and media theory as a mode of inquiry. What happens when we render the world as an image? How do cinematic images differ from other forms of image-making? What does it mean to be a spectator?

This course fulfills the theory requirement. It additionally fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Philosophical Inquiry and Life’s Meanings, Writing Intensive Course, Research and Information Literacy.

Affiliated Courses

The following courses are not guaranteed to CIMS students, but can be recognized for certain requirements should they be taken.

CAS EN 155, The Myth of the Family in Classical American Literature, Film, and Television

Susan Mizruchi

TR 3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

Blood bonds, criminality, violence, and language as they emerge across American cultural forms. Works include novels by Twain, Faulkner, Morrison, and Junot Diaz; films such as The Godfather and Boys Don’t Cry; serial television such as Breaking Bad and The Wire. Carries humanities divisional credit in CAS.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Social Inquiry I.

CAS SO 253, Sociology of Popular Culture

Benjamin Kampler

MWF 2:30 p.m. – 3:20 p.m.

Sociological perspectives on popular culture and mass media, with a focus on the consumption and production of cultural goods; the effects of popular culture on politics and inequalities; and the mutual interdependence of consumer identities and cultural fields.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: The Individual in Community, Social Inquiry I.

CAS AH 393, Contemporary Art: 1980 to Now

Gregory Williams

TR 3:30 p.m. – 4:45 p.m.

Explores the terms of debate, key figures, and primary sites for the production and reception of contemporary art on a global scale since 1980. Painting, installation art, new media, performance, art criticism, and curatorial practice are discussed.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness.

CAS AN 397, Anthropology and Film: Ways of Seeing

Shahla Haeri

M 2:30 p.m. – 5:15 p.m.

Considers the history and development of anthropological, ethnographic, and transcultural filmmaking. In-depth examination of important anthropological films in terms of methodologies, techniques, and strategies of expression; story, editing, narration, themes, style, content, art, and aesthetics.

This course fulfills a single unit in each of the following BU Hub areas: Aesthetic Exploration, Historical Consciousness.

COM FT 303, Understanding TV

Discussion MW 10:10 a.m. – 11:55 a.m., additional Lecture section required

This course examines television (and its foundation in radio) as it emerged, stabilized as an aesthetic and technological form, interacted with other media, was regulated and deregulated, and was shaped by and shaped the culture around it. We will use the sitcom and soap opera genres as aesthetic through-lines for this study and examine their evolution in historical contexts. Throughout the semester, we focus on broadcasting’s beginnings, expansion, establishment as the national, mass medium in America, and eventual fracturing into niches.

COM FT 520 A1, TV Theory and Criticism

Deborah Jaramillo

MW 12:20 p.m. – 2:05 p.m.

As an omnipresent site of entertainment and information, “reality” and fantasy, “quality” and “trash,” and commerce and the public interest, television requires an active, critical analysis of its texts, uses, and production of meaning. Students in this class will engage in such analysis, confronting television as a rich and contradictory site of entertainment, culture, politics, ideology, and signs. This discussion driven seminar sets aside evaluative considerations of TV in favor of theoretical and critical approaches that challenge widespread assumptions about the medium and expand our understanding of its role in our lives. These approaches, which constitute some of the dominant frameworks in Television Studies, include analyses of culture, industry, narrative, genre, images and sounds, liveness, and the television schedule.

COM FT 554 A1, Special Topics: Broadcast Horror

Deborah Jaramillo

MW 4:30 p.m. – 6:15 p.m.

This course can count for the genre requirement.

COM FT 554 C1, Global Queer Cinema

Roy Grundmann

R 3:30 p.m. – 7:15 p.m.

This course can count for the genre requirement.

COM FT 554 D1, Special Topics: International Thriller

Lindsay Decker

T 12:30 p.m. – 3:15 p.m., R 1:30 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

This course can count for the genre requirement.

COM FT 558 A1, American Independent Film, Part 3: Recent and Contemporary Work

Ray Carney

F 12:20 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

The course comprises one unit of a four-semester survey (each part of which is free-standing and may be taken separately and independently of each other and in any order, with no prerequisites) of the major achievements of the most important artistic movement of the last sixty years in American film–the independent feature filmmaking movement, in which American narrative filmmakers broke away from the financial, bureaucratic, and (most importantly) imaginative influence of Hollywood values and entertainment story-telling methods to create the most important works in American film–a series of generally low-tech, low-budget, DIY, personal-expression films, made and distributed more or less outside the mainstream exhibition system. This section of the survey focuses on the third generation of American independent feature filmmaking in the period running from approximately 2000 to the present. Since women have made some of the best and most important works in this area, as many female filmmakers as possible are being included.

This course can count for the movement requirement.

COM FT 576 A1, Global New Waves

Lindsay Decker

MW 10:10 a.m. – 11:55 a.m.

This course can count for the movement requirement.