Tagged: CAS

Assistant Professor Ksenia Bravaya recently received the Patricia Mclellan Leavitt Research Fund!

April 12th, 2016 in Uncategorized

Professor Ksenia Bravaya, Patricia Mclellan Leavitt Research Fund Awardee

Professor Ksenia Bravaya, Patricia Mclellan Leavitt Research Fund Awardee

Assistant Professor Ksenia Bravaya was recently selected by Boston University to receive the an award from the Patricia Mclellan Leavitt Research Fund. This award is designed “to support research of one or more non-tenured junior faculty members, or graduate students, in chemistry or biology at the College of Arts and Sciences. Preference shall be given to female faculty who demonstrate a commitment to encouraging women to study science, or to female graduate students.”

Dr. Bravaya will use these funds to support her research into challenging electronic structure phenomena in biomolecules and systems relevant for materials, which include photoinduced processes, autoionizing electronic states, and magnetic field effects. This award will help her and her team use and develop high-level electronic structure methods targeting processes involving multiple electronic states, chemistry of open-shell species in magnetic fields, and electronically excited and metastable systems.

Congratulations to Professor Bravaya!

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Chemistry of Drugs Talk Informs Alumni

December 15th, 2010 in Allen, Karen, Alumni, Faculty, Whitty, Adrian

Professor Adrian Whitty

Professor Adrian Whitty

Professor Karen Allen

Professor Karen Allen

Professor of Chemistry Karen Allen and Associate Professor of Chemistry Adrian Whitty gave a “Discoveries” talk to BU Alumni on December 1, 2010. Sponsored by the BU Alumni Association and the College of Arts & Sciences, the Discoveries lecture series taps the strength of BU faculty to give alumni a deeper look into the world and their lives.

The seminar, Lessons to be Learned from Cells: From Molecular Basis to Disease, highlighted advances and obstacles in current drug discovery and described how work at Boston University on NEMO, a protein in the pathways involved in human inflammatory diseases and cancers, aims to address critical problems.

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