Current PFFs

Jennifer ForeFore

  • e-mail: jfore@bu.edu
  • Office:   PHO B13
  • Phone:  (617) 353-9944

 

Dr. Fore joined the PFF Program in Spring 2014 as its first Photonics PFF, which means that her summer research in the Ziegler laboratory is being sponsored by the BU Photonics Center.   Dr. Fore is currently teaching CH 102, second semester of General Chemistry.  Her goals for teaching include implementing new technologies into the classroom and improving the overall educational experiences of undergraduates.  Dr. Fore received her Ph.D. from Northeastern University in December 2013 under the guidance of Prof. Max Diem.  Her doctoral research focused on applying vibrational spectroscopy (infrared and Raman) to study melanogenesis, monitoring the uptake of metallic nanoparticles, and characterization of an operating fuel cell.  She is currently working in the laboratory of Professor Lawrence Ziegler, a member of the Photonics Center, where she is involved in forensic applications of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopic techniques for improving analysis of bodily fluids.  She is also planning to aid in developing a forensic science course during her tenure at BU.

 

Lynetta MierMier, Lynetta

  • e-mail:  lmier@bu.edu
  • Office:   PHO B13
  • Phone:  (617) 353-9944

 

Dr. Mier joined the PFF Program in 2012.  She taught CH 101/102, General Chemistry, in her first year, and is currently teaching CH 303, Instrumental Analysis Laboratory, and CH 354, Physical Chemistry Laboratory. These courses teach the fundamental theoretical principles, capabilities, applications, and limitations of modern analytical instrumentation with laboratory in spectroscopy and analytical chromatography.  She designed the laboratory manual for the courses.  Dr. Mier is conducting research in physical chemistry with Professor Larry Ziegler, working on optical spectroscopic methodologies.  She received her Ph.D. from Ohio State University in 2012 working with Dr. Terry L. Gustafson and Dr. Arthur J. Epstein.  Lynetta’s doctoral research focused on characterizing excited state reactions and charge transfer processes of systems showing potential for use in solar energy.

 

Rajesh Nayak

Dr. Rajesh Nayak

Dr. Rajesh Nayak

  • e-mail:  raj1@bu.edu
  • Office:   LSE 1028
  • Phone:  (617) 353-8810

 

Dr. Rajesh Nayak joined the PFF Program in 2013.  He is currently teaching CH 101 and CH110, the General Chemistry and General and Quantitative Analytical Chemistry sequence. He received his Ph.D. in Physical Chemistry from Colorado State University in 2013 working with Dr. Alan Van Orden.  Rajesh’s doctoral dissertation focused on biophysical research involving conformational dynamics and reaction mechanism of nucleic acid hairpin folding and unfolding. As a PFF, Dr. Nayak is conducting biophysical research with Professor Tom Tullius, working on elucidating DNA structural information through the use of hydroxyl radical probing analyzed by capillary gel electrophoresis. The results from the hydroxyl radical probing can help explain how certain proteins can recognize variations in the DNA shape.

Daniele Ramella

Dr. Daniele Ramella

Dr. Daniele Ramella

  • e-mail:  ramella@bu.edu
  • Office:   SCI 365
  • Phone:  (617) 358-4646

 

Dr. Ramella joined the PFF Program in 2013 as its first Division of Materials Science & Engineering (MSE) PFF, which means that his summer research in the Doerrer laboratory is being sponsored by the MSE.  He is teaching in the off-sequence CH 101/102 General Chemistry courses with Professor Tom Keyes.  In this course, he is developing approaches for improved integration of the lecture and the lab portions, as well as developing teaching methods addressing the needs of very diverse groups of students. He is conducting research in inorganic chemistry with Professor Linda Doerrer.  Dr. Ramella received his Ph.D. in Chemistry, Boston University, Boston, MA, in 2013 with Dr. Scott Schaus. His dissertation was on “Organocatalytic acid mediated Mannich reactions and multicomponent boronate reactions to make chiral benzhydrils,” which reflects his organic background. Daniele received his B.Sc. in Chemistry from the University of Pavia (Pavia, Italy) in 2004 and his M.S. in Organic and Inorganic Chemistry from the University of Pavia in 2006. His M.S. dissertation was prepared in the laboratory of Prof. Martin Kotora, Charles University, Prague, Czech Republic, and was on “NiX2Ln catalyzed cyclization of a,w-dienes” which reflects Daniele’s interests in inorganic/metallorganic chemistry. Between 2006 and 2008, before joining Boston University as a graduate student, Daniele was a research associate for the “Center for dairy and crop sciences” of the Italian “Agricultural Research Council (CRA)”, where his focus was on the application of spectroscopic techniques to the analysis and characterization of agricultural and dairy products.

 

Jennifer SteeleVLUU L210  / Samsung L210

Dr. Jennifer Steele joined the PFF program in 2014.  She is currently teaching CH232, inorganic chemistry with Professor John Caradonna, and conducting research with Professor Linda Doerrer, working with high valent metal complexes and water oxidation catalysts.  Professor Doerrer is a member of the MSE.  Dr. Steele received her PhD in chemistry from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in 2013 working with Professor Gregory Girolami.  Her PhD research focused on the synthesis of novel chemical vapor deposition precursors, as well as, the catalytic polymerization and oligomerization of ethylene.

 

Ya Zhou

  • e-mail:  zysandra@bu.edu

    Dr. Ya Zhou

    Dr. Ya Zhou

  • Office:   SCI 274
  • Phone:  (617) 353-2575

 

Dr. Zhou is teaching both CHEM 203 discussion (organic chemistry) and the CHEM 203 lab. In addition, she is  teaching in a new CHEM 203 lab project with Professor John Snyder, which is called the Betulin Project. In this lab, each student is doing his/her own research based on the natural product, Betulin, extracted directly from the barks of the white birch (Btula alba, collected in Harvard, MA). The goal of this project is to prepare natural product scaffold-based compounds for bioscreening.  Dr. Zhou received her Ph.D. from Boston University in 2007 with Dr. Snyder.  her work focused on methodology development of heterocyclic scaffolds and the applications in molecular library synthesis.  Her dissertation was on the “Exploration into Preparation of New Heterocyle Scaffolds for Library  Synthesis.”  She did postdoctoral work from 2008-2009 in the laboratory of Professor Craig Lindsley in the Department of Pharmacology, Vanderbilt University, in the area of Central Nervous System (CNS) disease drug discovery.  From 2012-2013, she was a postdoctoral researcher in the laboratory of Professor Yoshito Kishi, Department of Chemistry & Chemical Biology, Harvard University, working on mycolatone cytotoxicity studies and NHK reaction ligand analysis.