Category: Undergraduate

BUnano Symposium sheds light on innovations in imaging

June 2nd, 2017 in Award, Faculty, Graduate, Grants & Funding, Grinstaff, Mark, Recognition, Research, Students, Uncategorized, Undergraduate

Bunano Symposium

On May 2 BU Nanotechnology Innovation Center (BUnano) held its inaugural symposium “Nanotechnology for Imaging”. The symposium focused on The “Nanotechnology For Imaging” symposium will be focused on highlighting accomplishments of BUnano faculty and students, and featured keynote presentation by 2014 Nobel Prize winner for Chemistry, Professor Stefan Hell.

 

BUnano Center Director Prof. Mark Grinstaff welcomed the audience in the packed Metcalf Trustee Ballroom. and presented BUnano’s mission to promote a vibrant and dynamic community for nano-related disciplines at BU. What distinguishes BUnano from other nano centers in the Boston area is its connection to the Boston Medical Center and the BUSM.  BUnano offers pilot grants to foster and support collaborative research of BU faculty across campuses in their pursuit of finding nano solutions to real life problems in technology and medicine.

 

The morning session featured a lineup of talks by BUnano faculty. Dr. Luca Dal Negro opened the scientific portion of the symposium with his talk on “Materials and Fields @ the Nanoscale: Optical Engineering of Resonant Nanostructures,” followed by Dr. Allison Dennis’s talk  “Cadmium-free Quantum Dots for Imaging in the Visible and Near Infrared” and the joint presentation by Drs. Joyce Wong and Victoria Herrera entitled “Janus Nanoparticles for Cancer Theranostics.” Dr. Luca Dal Negro is an Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Materials Science and Engineering, and Physics at BU. He introduced his group’s research related to the development of novel plasmonic materials and nanostructures for spectroscopy. Dr. Allison Dennis, Biomedical Engineering Assistant Professor, discussed how her group uses cadmium-free Quantum Dot chemistries for applications in fluorescent biosensing and improved biomedical imaging. Dr. Joyce Wang, a Professor in Biomedical Engineering and Professor of Medicine Dr. Victoria Herrera discussed their interdisciplinary collaboration on developing theranostic Janus USPION for enhanced MRI imaging and targeted nucleic acid therapy to treat non-druggable cases, especially in pancreatic cancer.

 

After lunch break, Dr. Selim Unlu, a BUnano affiliated faculty and professor of Electrical Engineering introduced the keynote speaker of the symposium, Prof. Stefan Hell. He is the current Director at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry in Germany. In 2014 Prof Hell was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his pioneering work in the field of ultra high resolution fluorescence microscopy. Stefan Hell succeeded in radically overcoming the resolution limit of conventional optical microscopes – a breakthrough that has enabled new ground‐breaking discoveries in biological and medical research.

 

Prof. Hell’s exciting talk on flurorescence nanoscopy featured his recent research on how to neutralize diffraction in order to achieve imaging of cells and tissues at the nanoscale. For close to an hour, Prof Hell held the audience’s attention captive, transforming them to the realm of STED microscopy infecting them with the possibility of capturing images of the nanoworld.

 

Twenty students and postdoctoral fellows were selected to present their posters at the symposium. Ms Qianyun Zhang, a student in Dr. Bjoern Rheinhard’s Lab, received $500 for her poster “Illuminating EGFR clustering and its Effects on Signal.”

 

The symposium concluded with BUnano’s version of the popular show Shark Tank, “Terrier Tank.” The competition was moderated by Dr. Ahmad Khalil, Biomedical Engineering Assistant Professor at BU. Five finalists presented their innovative translational research idea to a panel of judges. The panel included BUnano Entrepreneur-in-Residence Dr. Jill Becker (CEO and Founder of 02139 Inc), Dr. David Coleman, Chair of the Department of Medicine at BUSM, Peter Marton of BU’s Questrom School of Business and Buzz Lab, Jess McLear of Launchpad Venture Group, and  Dr. Terry Russell, Managing Director of Interface Ventures. It was truly exciting to see undergraduate students, graduate students and postdoctoral associates striving to take a nascent idea and translate into a marketable product which would provide tangible benefit to our society.

 

After careful consideration, the judges awarded the $10,000 prize to CatchAu – an environmentally conscious wastewater treatment idea by a team of graduate students, Mingfu Chen, Uros Kuzmanovic, and Nicolas Shu.

 

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Boston Universities 2017 Chemistry Undergraduate Symposium

June 2nd, 2017 in Department, Faculty, Recognition, Research, Snyder, John, Students, Undergraduate

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On Friday, May 5th, 2017 the work of 11 students was spotlighted in this year’s Undergraduate Research Symposium (URS).  The outstanding quality of the projects presented underscored the importance of the hands-on, challenging research that is the hallmark of BU’s Chemistry major. The even was organized by the Undergraduate Programs Committee, Professor John Snyder and coordinated by our Undergraduate Coordinator, Lauren Jett.

URS was first instituted in 1987 by then Director of Undergraduate Studies, and now Emeritus, Prof. Mort Hoffman, and has been a much anticipated, spring’s-end annual event ever since.  The Symposium is modeled along the lines of talks at an American Chemical Society (ACS) meeting:  12 minutes of presentation followed by 3 minutes of questions and discussion.  Capping the day was the announcement of the Departmental Awards, followed by a celebratory BBQ for the students, their faculty advisers, graduate mentors, and their guests.  To view URS photos, please click here.

 

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Professor Rosina M. Georgiadis’ use of “virtual machines” featured in Chemical & Engineering News

April 13th, 2017 in ACS, Faculty, Recognition, Software, Teaching, Undergraduate

Georgiadis helps students as they work with virtual machines in the classroom. Credit: Joseph Griffin/Digital Creative Associates

Georgiadis helps students as they work with virtual machines in the classroom.
Credit: Joseph Griffin/Digital Creative Associates

New approaches to undergraduate lab classes

Virtual machines, digital badges, and trips to the museum enrich the undergraduate lab experience.
When it comes to developing fresh educational approaches, college and university professors focus on the classroom and often neglect the laboratory. But, at the ACS national meeting, held earlier this month in San Francisco, attendees heard from professors who are working to improve the undergraduate laboratory experience.
Professor Rosina M. Georgiadis, along with Norman C. Lee and the staff at the Boston University Chemical Instrumentation Center, partnered with Agilent Technologies to use virtual machines in her classes to end the “round robin” student rotation approach to lab courses.  To find out more read the article here in C&EN by Celia Henry Arnaud titled New approaches to undergraduate lab classes: Virtual Machines, digital badges and trips to the museum enrich undergraduate lab experience.

Professors Snyder and Abrams collaborate with colleagues in Biology and Neuroscience to create novel, interdisciplinary courses: Integrated Science Experience 1 & 2

January 5th, 2017 in Abrams, Binyomin, Department, Faculty, Grants, Snyder, John, Teaching, Uncategorized, Undergraduate

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Curcumin Compound

 

 

Interdisciplinary, Integrated Course Ideas Receive Provost Grants

Chemistry faculty, John Snyder and Binyomin Abrams, in conjunction with colleagues in the Departments of Biology (Kathryn Spilios and John “Chip” Celenza) and Neuroscience (Paul Lipton and Lucia Pastorino) have successfully proposed ideas to develop integrated, inquiry-based laboratory courses for first and second year biology, chemistry, and neuroscience students.   Jointly funded by the Office of the Provost, the Center Teaching & Learning, and the College of Arts and Sciences, these interdisciplinary course development grants aim to promote faculty and student collaboration across disciplines in support of innovative, research-oriented undergraduate laboratory education.   The new courses that are being developed, Integrated Science Experience 1 (ISE 1, for second semester freshmen) and ISE 2 (for first semester sophomores) will facilitate students making connections across biology, chemistry, and neuroscience early in their undergraduate careers. Such interdisciplinary insights will better prepare for advanced courses and undergraduate research. Developed in 2015 and 2016, ISE 1 and ISE 2 were piloted in the Spring and Fall 2016 terms, respectively.

Interdisciplinary Science Experience 1

The first-semester ISE1 course was piloted in the Spring 2016 semester. Forty students with majors ranging from biology to philosophy engaged in a semester-long study focused around characterizing the kinetics of tyrosinase-catalyzed production of L-Dopa and screening of small-molecule inhibitors. The labs integrated teaching on the basics of instrumentation, lab practices/skills, research practices in STEM, working with scientific literature, and writing in the sciences, while synthesizing information related to chemistry, biology, and neuroscience.

Interdisciplinary Science Experience 2

A pilot of this first semester, sophomore program began this fall semester (2016) supported by Boston University. In this program, eleven students enrolled in Organic Chemistry 1 (CH 203), and Cell Biology (BI 203 or 213) or Neuroscience I (NE 203) work on a specific project that combines labs in both Organic Chemistry and Cell Biology, with an emphasis on Neuroscience, modeling a drug discovery effort for Alzheimer’s disease. This project, which was organized as a graduate level research group would be, with weekly group meetings replacing pre-lab lectures, focused on the isolation of curcumin from turmeric, and the synthesis of specific analogues in the organic chemistry lab, with parallel biological experiments probing the activities of these compounds as relates to Alzheimer’s dementia. Curcumin has a well-validated biological activities to launch the biology lab. The analogues prepared in the organic lab were selected for their practicality of preparation at the sophomore level, as well as to probe specific structural features of curcumin that might be responsible for the activity. In addition, the procedures in both labs were designed as an educational vehicle that would greatly enhance the lectures in Organic Chemistry 1, Cell Biology, and Neuroscience. This pilot program culminated with students designing their own capstone projects in both the chemistry and biology labs.

Professor Snyder said “The results from our first year experience have been even better than expected. New analogues of curcumin have been prepared, and the biological effects of these analogues have never been reported before. We are now seeking funding from the AAU to expand this pilot project with a second, research oriented project centered around capsaicin, the ‘hot’ ingredient of habanero which has also been implicated as having beneficial neurological effects.”

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Tyler Casselman wins 2016 Laursen Summer Research Scholarship

May 11th, 2016 in Award, Front Page, Laursen Research Scholarship Award, Recognition, Research, Snyder, John, Students, Undergraduate

Tyler Casselman Laursen Scholarship Winner

Tyler Casselman Laursen Scholarship Winner

Undergraduate student Tyler Casselman, a rising Junior doing research in Prof. John Snyder’s laboratory, is the 2016 recipient of the Laursen Summer Research Scholarship (LSRS).  Tyler’s summer research continues his investigations in the Snyder group into a synthesis of drug transport within a polymer.  His work focuses on developing a procedure to integrate a highly reactive ring system, known as a tetrazine, into polymers. This has an immediate application to drug transport within a polymer via a cycloaddition, which will further the research of the Snyder Group.

Tyler, who is 21 and comes from East Amherst, New York, is interested in natural product synthesis and diversification methods.  Once done with his undergraduate education here at BU he plans to continue his study chemistry in graduate school and is hoping to stay in the Boston area.

The scholarship is funded by the Laursen Endowment, which was created to honor Prof. Emeritus Richard Laursen by his former students. The goal of the Laursen Endowment is to advance the training of highly qualified BU chemistry students interested in pursuing scientific careers by providing salary support pursue research during the summer term.

Interdisciplinary, Integrated Course Ideas Receive Provost Grants

May 21st, 2015 in Uncategorized, Undergraduate

Chemistry faculty, John Snyder and Binyomin Abrams, in conjunction with colleagues in the Departments of Biology (Kathryn Spilios and John “Chip” Celenza) and Neuroscience (Paul Lipton and Lucia Pastorino) have successfully proposed ideas to develop integrated, inquiry-based laboratory courses for first and second year biology, chemistry, and neuroscience students.   Jointly funded by the Office of the Provost, the Center for Excellence & Innovation in Teaching, and the College of Arts and Sciences, these interdisciplinary course development grants aim to promote faculty and student collaboration across disciplines in support of innovative, research-oriented undergraduate laboratory education.   The new courses that are being developed, Integrated Science Experience 1 (ISE 1) (for second semester freshmen) and ISE 2 (for first semester sophomores), will facilitate students making connections across biology, chemistry, and neuroscience early in their undergraduate careers. Such interdisciplinary insights will better prepare for advanced courses and undergraduate research. Developed in 2015, the courses are anticipated to start in the Spring 2016, and Fall 2016 terms, respectively.

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Prof. John Snyder, Chemistry

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Prof. Binyomin Abrams, Chemistry

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Prof. “Chip” Celenza, Biology

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Prof. Kathryn Spilios, Biology

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Prof. Lucia Pastorino, Neuroscience

Prof. Paul Lipton, Neuroscience

Prof. Paul Lipton, Neuroscience

Abrams Receives 2015 Metcalf Award for Excellence in Teaching

May 11th, 2015 in Undergraduate

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2015 Metcalf Award Recipient, Dr. Binyomin Abrams

Every year, as the academic year draws to a close, Boston University honors a number of faculty for their outstanding work in the classroom and with their students with the Metcalf Award for Excellence in Teaching.  This year, Senior Lecturer in Chemistry, Dr. Binyomin Abrams, has received Boston University’s top teaching award.

Dr. Abrams investment in the advancement of his students influences all of his activities as an educator, including making chemical education his primary research pursuit.  In his second year at BU, he received the College of Arts and Science’s 2010 Templeton Prize for Excellence in Student Advising.  In the area of chemical education, he has developed, both with colleagues and independently, a number of programs to improve Boston University’s level of chemical education and to provide his students with the best possible science learning experience.   This year, he and colleagues in Chemistry, Biology, and Neuroscience successfully competed for Office of the Provost grants to develop integrated, inquiry-based laboratory courses for first and second year Biology, Chemistry, and Neuroscience students.   These interdisciplinary course development grants will generate faculty and student collaboration across disciplines in support of innovative undergraduate education.

Group work 1Dr. Abrams received his PhD from New York University and does research in molecular dynamics with a focus on the development of computational models for biomimetic foldamers. In the area of education, he has developed and run the BU Chemical Writing Program, which introduces Chemistry students to research-based writing in the context of inquiry-based chemistry laboratory courses.  Additional projects have included the development of workshops to help incoming undergraduates succeed in the sciences; preparing hybrid, partially “flipped” activities for out-of-class student engagement in introductory chemistry courses; and the continued expansion of the freshman year chemistry lab alternatives to the honors freshman chemistry lab.

Dr.  Abrams is the sixth Chemistry faculty recipient since the award was established in 1974.  Previous recipients have included:

Environmental Health Scientist Speaks at Chemistry Convocation

April 21st, 2015 in Alumni, Front Page, Undergraduate

Dr. Urvashi Rangan, Director Consumer Safety and Sustainability, will be Chemistry’s 2015 Distinguished Alumni Speaker

The Director of the Consumer Safety and Sustainability Group for Consumer Reports, Dr. Urvashi Rangan, was the Distinguished Alumni Speaker at this year’s Chemistry Convocation (May 16, 2015).  Dr. Rangan received her BA in Chemistry from Boston University in 1990, doing undergraduate research in organic chemistry with Prof. John Snyder.  She received her PhD in Environmental Health Sciences from Johns Hopkins University in 1995 and did postdoctoral work at the Environmental and Occupational Health Science Institute (Rutgers University).  She was an NIH fellow from 1990-97.

A noted environmental health scientist, Dr. Rangan has a column in Consumer Reports’ ShopSmart magazine and also serves as a top spokesperson for Consumer Reports in the areas of sustainable production and consumption practices. She has a wide area of expertise, including organic standards, food safety issues, environmental pollution, toxics in consumer products, and environmental health concerns and has appeared in numerous national broadcast outlets. Her expertise is called upon to respond to breaking product safety news, speak on behalf of CU investigative test stories, and to discuss production problems and consumer solutions around a wide range of sustainability topics including food safety issues, organic food, risky ingredients in personal care products, misleading labels, electronics recycling, and energy efficiency for household products.

At the Consumers Union, which she joined in 1999, she has been responsible for managing risk analysis, policy assessments, label evaluations and consumer advice for tests, reports, and related advocacy work.  She developed the ratings system, database, and Web site, Eco-labels.org, for evaluating environmental and food labels. In 2005, she managed the launch of GreenerChoices,org, which covers green aspects over a wide range of products and services.   To “meet” Dr. Rangan, please go to her 2012 TEDxManhattan talk, “From fables to labels.”

 

 

Chemistry Receives NSF REU Site Award

August 8th, 2012 in Doerrer, Linda, Front Page, NSF, Snyder, John, Undergraduate

Professor Linda Doerrer

Professor Linda Doerrer

Professor John Snyder

Professor John Snyder

National Science Foundation

The National Science Foundation’s Research Experience for Undergraduates Program supports active research participation by undergraduate students in any of the areas of research funded by the National Science Foundation. For the second time, BU Chemistry has received one of these coveted site awards. Focused on the theme “Fundamental Research in Chemistry Addressing Problems in Biology,” the 3-year program (2012-2015) is led by Professors John Snyder (Principal Investigator) and Linda Doerrer (Co-PI).
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Abrams Undergraduate Researcher Awarded ACS NES Summer Fellowship

June 18th, 2012 in Abrams, Binyomin, Award, Front Page, Undergraduate

The Northeastern Section of the American Chemical Society (NESACS) established the James Flack Norris and Theodore William Richards Undergraduate Summer Fellowships to honor the memories of Professors Norris and Richards by promoting research interactions between undergraduate students and faculty.

This year’s NESACS summer research fellowship was awarded to Morris Cohen (BU Chemistry, Class of 2013), who joined the research group of Dr. Binyomin Abrams in the fall of 2011. Under the mentorship of Dr. Abrams and former PFF Dr. Adam Moser, Morris has been working on the development of an all-atom computational model for the meta-phenylene ethynylene class of foldamers – oligomers that fold into helical structures in solution using non-covalent interactions. Morris has been utilizing several software packages for this work, including Gaussian, CHARMM, and NAMD, on computational resources located at BU as well as the RANGER supercomputer at the University of Texas, Austin.

Morris Cohen receiving a 2012 NESACS Norris-Richards Undergraduate Summer Research Scholarship at the 2012 NESACS Awards Ceremony with Dr. Binyomin Abrams

Morris Cohen receiving a 2012 NESACS Norris-Richards Undergraduate Summer Research Scholarship at the 2012 NESACS Awards Ceremony with Dr. Binyomin Abrams

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