News & Events

Events

February 2017: Impact released

March 1: King Lear and the Double Bind: A Lecture by Sir Christopher Ricks

March 31: Kaz Hawkins Performance

April 6: Poetry Reading Series with Eilean Ni Chuilleanain

July 14-16: 22nd Annual Dickens Symposium: Interdisciplinary Dickens. Registration and accommodations information here.

A Look at Undergraduate Research: First Wives and Marriage in British Novels

By Alisa Harris
March 15th, 2017 in Center for Interdisciplinary Teaching & Learning, Faculty, News and Events, Of Special Interest, Research, Students.

This post is part of a series that profiles the faculty-undergraduate research partnerships offered through the Center for Interdisciplinary Teaching & Learning. To learn more, please contact the Center at citl@bu.edu. A married woman abandons her husband and child to elope with a suitor who jilts her. A woman suffers hallucinations after she is suspected of burning her stepson to death. A mistress curses the young bride whose marriage will disinherit her son. Reading sensational nineteenth–century stories like these are all part of Kerry Sadlier’s work with Joellen Masters, senior lecturer of humanities at Boston University College of General Studies. With Sadlier’s invaluable help, Masters is studying marriage and the first wife as a narrative trope and genre strategy in the British and early modernist novel. Sadlier (CGS’17, COM’19) became interested in participating in the CGS Undergraduate Research Experience when Associate Dean Megan Sullivan mentioned the program in a meeting: “I decided to pursue it when I realized how much I enjoyed the research aspect of my RH102 research paper.” Funded by the Center for Interdisciplinary Teaching & Learning, the CGS Undergraduate Research Experience gives CGS students a stipend for their research work with a CGS faculty member. When she learned about... More

Megan Sullivan Completes Leadership Training at 2016 HERS Denver Summer Institute

By Alisa Harris
August 1st, 2016 in Center for Interdisciplinary Teaching & Learning, Faculty, News and Events.

Megan Sullivan, associate dean for faculty research and development and director of the Center for Interdisciplinary Teaching and Learning, joined other leaders in higher education for the 2016 Higher Education Resource Services Denver Summer Institute. Along with 62 women leaders from across the United States, Sullivan completed the intensive, 12-day leadership development curriculum that HERS offers to help participants "gain the knowledge and skills needed to lead change on their campus and positively affect higher education." HERS "is dedicated to creating and sustaining a community of women leaders through leadership development programs and other strategies with a special focus on gender equity within the broader commitment to achieving equality and excellence in higher education." Its three Institutes have provided leadership and management development to approximately 5000 women faculty and staff members from 1200 campuses. Sullivan participated in institute sessions such as Managing and Leading Change: Your Role in Re-inventing Higher Education, New Partnerships & New Pathways, Leaning into Turbulent Times, Exploring Inclusive Excellence and Reframing: Work-Life to Living Well.  Faculty and guest speakers included: Betty Stewart, provost and vice president for academic affairs, Midwestern State University; Soraya Coley, president, Cal Poly Pomona; and Tuajuanda Jordan, president, St. Mary’s College of Maryland. Sullivan also... More

CITL Summer Institute To Explore 1960s Politics and Pop Culture

By Alisa Harris
May 9th, 2016 in Center for Interdisciplinary Teaching & Learning, News and Events, Of Special Interest.

On July 16, Boston University College of General Studies will host a day of interdisciplinary learning exploring the politics, protests, progressivists and publications of a decade of radical social change—the 1960s. The event is hosted by the Center for Interdisciplinary Teaching & Learning and is the fourth Annual Summer Institute hosted by CITL. Each year, the institute highlights interdisciplinary and experiential learning—two hallmarks of the CGS teaching model. CITL Summer Institute: The 1960s will treat attendees to four interactive talks, breakfast and lunch, and a reception with the rock music of the 1960s. Megan Sullivan, CGS associate dean for faculty research and development and director of CITL, said the theme for this year’s event emerged from the unique interests and expertise of CGS faculty. Thomas Whalen, associate professor of social sciences, will bring his study of presidential politics to the topic “Bobby, the Gipper, and Tricky Dick: The 1968 Presidential Election and Transformation of American Politics.” Lynn O’Brien Hallstein, associate professor of rhetoric, will speak on “Male Bashers, Mother Haters, and Bra Burners: The Myths and Truths of the Women’s Movement.” Lecturer Charles Henebry studies comic books and other graphic narratives and will be speaking on “Sick Humor and Upright Morals: Squeaky... More

The Impact of Parental Incarceration: Dean Sullivan Releases New Book

By Marisa Weiner
March 28th, 2016 in Center for Interdisciplinary Teaching & Learning, Faculty, News and Events, Publications, Research.

1.7 million children currently have parents in the United States prison system. 30% of them will follow in their parents’ footsteps. Those are the astounding statistics that are discussed at length in Associate Dean Megan Sullivan’s new book, Parental Incarceration: Personal Accounts and Developmental Impact.  The book, which is now available on Amazon and Routledge.com, examines the various perspective of adults who experienced parental incarceration during childhood and analyzes the impact of the experience on health, development and the risk for intergenerational crime and incarceration. We asked Dean Sullivan to reflect on her experience of writing Parental Incarceration. CGS: What kind of conversation do you hope this book will spark? Sullivan: I hope this book sparks a wide and diverse dialogue about incarceration. Particularly its effects on children and families. For the most part, there are only certain people who tend to discuss incarceration – people who work in corrections, scholars and policy analysts, and incarcerated people and those who love them. I would love to see others get involved in the discussion. Imagine if students and neighbors and policy makers and families of incarcerated men and women could come together to discuss what they knew about prisons and criminal justice. Or, better yet, what... More

A Look at Undergraduate Research: Climate Change and Law

By rswirsky
February 18th, 2016 in Center for Interdisciplinary Teaching & Learning, Faculty, News and Events, Of Special Interest, Research, Spotlight, Students.

This post is part of a series that profiles the faculty-undergraduate research partnerships offered through the Center for Interdisciplinary Teaching & Learning. To learn more, please contact the Center at citl@bu.edu. This past November, representatives from 195 countries came together for the 2015 United Nations Climate Change conference in effort to create a binding and universal agreement on climate from all the nations of the world. While the environment has been a long-time concern for many, it has increasingly gained momentum as carbon emissions ever-increase and more countries recognize and take ownership for their policies and actions.  As the conversation about environmental protection intensifies, Humanities professor R. Samuel Deese and junior Isabel Keogh (CGS 15, SHA 17) are eagerly researching the life and work of maritime law and environmental protection expert Elisabeth Mann Borgese. As the youngest daughter of the German author and anti-facist Thomas Mann, Elisabeth became concerned with global law and a specific interest in ocean conservation. During the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea from 1973-1982, she served on an expert group that helped define the rights and responsibilities of nations with respect to their use of the world's oceans, establishing guidelines for businesses, the environment, and the management of marine natural... More