Publications

TitleExclusive Breastfeeding and Breast Problems in HIV-infected Women
AuthorsSemrau K., Kuhn L., Brooks D.R., Cabral H.J., Sinkala M., Kankasa C., Thea D.M., Aldrovandi G.M.
PublicationAmerican Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology. 2011 Jun;.
Abstract

Objective:

To examine the relationship between breastfeeding patterns, markers of maternal HIV disease, and woman’s breast pathology.

Study Design:

Secondary data analysis from a randomized breastfeeding trial including 947 HIV-infected women (n=5,982 visits) from breastfeeding initiation until: 6 months post-partum; 1 month after breastfeeding cessation; or loss-to-follow-up/death. Generalized estimating equations assessed the effects of breastfeeding pattern and maternal HIV status on breast pathology.

Results:

190 (20.1%) women had a breast problem; 86 (9.1%) had mastitis and 31 (3.3%) had abscess. After confounder adjustment, non-exclusively breastfeeding women increased risk of breast problems (OR: 1.98 95% CI: 1.33, 2.95) and mastitis (OR: 2.87 95% CI: 1.69, 4.88) compared to exclusive breastfeeders. Women with CD4 count <200 cells/uL tended to have increased risk of abscess.

Conclusions:

Non-exclusive breastfeeding significantly increased the risk of breast pathology. Exclusive breastfeeding is not only optimal for infant health; it benefits mothers by reducing breast problems.
URLhttp://www.ajog.org/article/S0002-9378(11)00749-6/abstract
Related ProjectsZambia Exclusive Breastfeeding Study (ZEBS)