CGHD in the News

Effects of Obesity on Death Rates Understated in Prior Research

January 5, 2016 in CGHD in the News

Researchers from the School of Public Health and the University of Pennsylvania have found that prior studies of the link between obesity and mortality are flawed because they rely on one-time measures of body mass index (BMI) that obscure the health impacts of weight change over time. The study, published online... More

Strengthening the Cascade – Current Work and New Ideas on the Cascade of Care for HIV, TB, and HCV

October 13, 2015 in CGHD in the News

A Boston University Research Workshop January 13, 2016 10:00am - 3:00pm Boston University Medical Campus Crosstown Building, Room 2127/2128 801 Massachusetts Avenue RSVP Today View Agenda The concept of the “cascade of care” for chronic diseases is gaining prominence in research on service delivery for HIV, TB, and HCV treatment globally. From initial screening and diagnosis, to... More

Obesity Paradox Doesn’t Hold Up

October 9, 2015 in CGHD in the News

A study co-authored by Andrew Stokes, assistant professor of global health, shows obesity does not protect patients with cardiovascular disease. Study after study has shown obese or overweight people with cardiovascular disease outliving their normal weight counterparts—the so-called obesity paradox. Stokes and Samuel Preston, professor of sociology at the University of Pennsylvania, More

Provision of HIV Treatment Can Save Companies Money

September 29, 2015 in CGHD in the News

In settings with a high prevalence of HIV, such as South Africa, provision of antiretroviral therapy programs (ART) in the workplace can result in cost savings for companies due to reductions in healthcare costs, absenteeism, and staff turnover, according to a study led by a School of Public Health global... More

SPH Insider: Gates Grant in Hand, BUSPH Researcher Prepares to Fight Newborn Mortality in Zambia

Vitamin A Deficiency: Slow Progress Towards Elimination

September 29, 2015 in CGHD in the News

Addressing gaps in vitamin A sufficiency around the world and redirecting attention to regions struggling to make progress is critical to eliminating ongoing vitamin deficiency, two School of Public Health researchers write in The Lancet Global Health. In a commentary accompanying a new study on vitamin A deficiency, David Hamer and... More

SPH Insider: Gates Grant in Hand, BUSPH Researcher Prepares to Fight Newborn Mortality in Zambia

Pre-Planning, Travel Histories Important for Children

September 29, 2015 in CGHD in the News

Children travelling abroad are potentially exposed to a wide spectrum of illnesses, and a detailed travel history is important in those presenting to emergency rooms with symptoms suggesting infectious disease, according to a new study co-authored by a School of Public Health researcher. Writing in the Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, a... More

Quasi-Experiments Can Contribute to HIV Research

September 29, 2015 in CGHD in the News

Quasi-experiments—research designs in which investigators study quasi-random variation in exposures occurring naturally in the world or because of a policy—have generated important data on the impacts of HIV testing and treatment, according to a publication led by a School of Health researcher. Writing in the journal Current Opinion in HIV and... More

Public-Private Partnership Improves Health Care in Lesotho

June 8, 2015 in CGHD in the News

Clinical services and patient outcomes improved at a hospital network in Lesotho after its operations were shifted from the government to a public-private partnership, a new study led by Boston University global health researchers reports. The study in the journal Health Affairs gauged changes that occurred after the government of Lesotho entered... More

Narrow Focus on Ebola May Miss Other Ailments

June 4, 2015 in CGHD in the News

Clinicians looking for Ebola among sick travelers coming from West African countries may miss more common deadly illnesses, especially malaria, which requires quick diagnosis and appropriate treatment, according to a study co-authored by a School of Public Health researcher. The study by David Hamer, professor of global health, and colleagues in... More

More Efforts Needed to Keep Children in HIV Treatment, Study Says

February 27, 2015 in CGHD in the News

Rates of retention in care for children receiving HIV treatment in low- and middle-income countries are similar to those for adults, but more interventions are needed to reduce attrition in pediatric care, a new study from School of Public Health researchers says. In the first-ever systematic review of pediatric retention—including more... More