Report from the 2012 ASM Eastern Fellowship

in Announcements, Uncategorized
November 7th, 2012

Three faculty members–Drs. Robert, Daneel, and Thangaraj–and seven students attended the 2012 ASM Eastern Fellowship last weekend. Daewon Moon filed the following report:

STH alum, Prof. Ben Hartley of Palmer Seminary presided

STH alum, Prof. Ben Hartley of Palmer Seminary presided

The 2012 ASM Eastern Fellowship was held at the Maryknoll Sisters
Center in Maryknoll, New York on November 2–3, with the theme
“Classics of Mission Spirituality.” STH alum, Prof. Ben Hartley of Palmer Seminary, presided.

Dr. Rady Roldan-Figueroa of Boston University gave his presentation on
the spirituality of Bartholome de Las Casas (1484–1566), a Dominican
missionary and social reformer in the Americas. Roldan-Figueroa
discussed the significance of Las Casas’ treatise “De unico vocationis
modo” (“On the Only Way of Conversion”), focusing on distinctive
characteristics of sixteenth-century Spanish spirituality in the
Observance movement within the religious orders.

Sister Claudette LaVerdiere of the Maryknoll Sisters presented her
research on the spirituality of Mother Mary Joseph Rogers (1882–1955),
the founder of the Maryknoll order. While a student at Smith College
in 1904, Mary Josephine organized a Mission Study Club for Catholic
students. Her recognition of women’s power for mission significantly
contributed to the formation of the Maryknoll Sisters, which sent its
first missionary sisters to China in 1921. Mother Mary Joseph’s focus
on cultivating character became an integral part of the spirituality
of the Maryknolls, who adopted the motto “Making God’s love visible.”

STH alum, Dr. Grace May, a conference speaker, with two visiting researchers in World Christianity from the People's Republic of China

STH alum, Dr. Grace May, a conference speaker, with two visiting researchers in World Christianity from the People's Republic of China

Dr. Grace May of City Seminary of New York gave a talk on Margaret
Emma Barber (1866–1929), a missionary to China who was a spiritual
mentor of Watchman Nee, the most influential leader in the Chinese
house church movement. Strongly influenced by the Keswick holiness
movement in England, Barber emphasized the discipleship training of
indigenous people, particularly the training of local “Bible women” to
reach out other women.

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