BU celebrates The Caversham Press

The Boston University College of Fine Arts School of Visual Arts and the Boston University Art Gallery will exhibit 170 works by South African artists in two major exhibitions celebrating The Caversham Press. The exhibitions speak to Caversham’s history as it reflects artists’ responses to the dramatic political and cultural shifts that have occurred in South Africa over the past two and half decades.

February 8-March 27
Opening Receptions: Wednesday, February 9, 6-8pm (free and open to the public)

South Africa: Artists, Prints, Community / Twenty Five Years at The Caversham Press
808 Gallery at Boston University

Three Artists at the Caversham Press – Deborah Bell, Robert Hodgins and William Kentridge
Boston University Art Gallery at the Stone Gallery

View a full schedule of related public programming surrounding these exhibitions, including a free lecture by William Kentridge on February 28.

Tuesday, February 8 – Sunday, March 27
South Africa: Artists, Prints, Community
Twenty Five Years at The Caversham Press

This exhibition features a survey of work from the printmaking studio The Caversham Press located in KwaZulu Natal, South Africa. It will include over 120 prints and community-based projects produced by a diverse roster of South African and international artists. Founded in 1985 during the turbulent years of late apartheid, The Caverhsam Press has occupied an important place in the development of South African printmaking. From the founding years in which it focused almost exclusively on formally trained artists, to its current dedication to training young, emergent artists, Caversham’s history reflects the political and cultural shifts that have taken place in South Africa over the past two and half decades. Presented by the Boston University School of Visual Arts at the College of Fine Arts.
Opening Reception: Wednesday, February 9, 6:00-8:00pm
808 Gallery

Tuesday, February 8 – Sunday, March 27
Three Artists at The Caversham Press – Deborah Bell, Robert Hodgins and William Kentridge
Presented concurrently with South Africa: Artists, Prints, Community/Twenty Five Years at The Cavesham Press, this companion exhibition features the work of three South African artists who were important participants in the early years of The Caversham Press. Comprising over 65 prints, the exhibition features selections from three collaborative print portfolios—Hogarth in Johannesburg, Little Morals, and Ubu Tells the Truth—as well as individual prints created by Bell, Hodgins and Kentridge at Caversham from 1985 to the present. Collectively, the work reflects Caversham’s beginnings as well as articulates the artists’ perspectives of living and working in South Africa during the years between late apartheid and the transition to the new democracy. Presented by the Boston University Art Gallery.
Opening Reception: Wednesday, February 9, 6:00-8:00pm
BUAG at the Stone Gallery

Monday, February 28, 6:30pm
Tim Hamill Visiting Artist Lecture: William Kentridge
One of South Africa’s leading visual artists, William Kentridge is best known for his remarkable films, works on paper, and theatrical works. His recently acclaimed exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York featured work from the past two decades, along with films and motorized theater sets. Kentridge’s work touches on the atrocities of apartheid and social injustice, yet also reflects the new South Africa. In an introductory note to his film Felix in Exile, Kentridge writes, “In the same way that there is a human act of dismembering the past there is a natural process in the terrain through erosion, growth, and dilapidation that also seeks to blot out events. In South Africa this process has other dimensions. The very term ‘New South Africa’ has within it the idea of a painting over the old, the natural process of dismembering, the naturalization of things new.” Presented by the Boston University School of Visual Arts at the College of Fine Arts.
Morse Auditorium

Please call 617.353.3371 for more information about any of these events, and read the full press release here.

PUBLIC PROGRAMMING AND RELATED EVENTS:

All events are free and open to the public unless otherwise noted:

South Africa: Artists, Prints, Community / Twenty Five Years at The Caversham Press
February 8 – March 27
Opening Reception: Wednesday, February 9, 6-8pm
808 Gallery (808 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston)

Three Artists at the Caversham Press – Deborah Bell, Robert Hodgins and William Kentridge
February 8 – March 27
Opening Reception: Wednesday, February 9, 6-8pm
BUAG at the Stone Gallery (855 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston)

Lecture: Repositioning: White South African Artists in the ‘New’ South Africa
Pamela Allara, Professor emerita of Brandeis University
Presented by Boston University’s Graduate Student Art History Association
Monday, February 14, 5:30pm
BU College of Arts and Sciences (725 Commonwealth Avenue, Room 200, Boston)

Lecture: Social Imprinting, Paper Evidence: Pre- and Post-Apartheid South African Printmaking
Dr. Marion Arnold, Art Historian and Postgraduate Research Degrees Coordinator, School of the Arts, Loughborough University
Tuesday, February 15, 12:30-2pm
BU College of Fine Arts (855 Commonwealth Avenue, Room 500, Boston)

The Road to Mecca, a play by Athol Fugard
February 16-March 5
BU Theatre, Lane-Comley Studio 210 (264 Huntington Avenue, Boston)
South Africa’s preeminent playwright explores the transformative power of art in this tale of an eccentric sculptor. A production from the Boston Center for American Performance (BCAP), the professional extension of the BU School, of Theatre. Directed by Judy Braha.
Tickets: $20 general admission; additional details available at www.bu.edu/cfa/bcap

Gallery Talk with the staff of Caversham Center for Artists & Writers: Malcolm Christian, Founder & Director; Jabu Mtheku, Administrator; Sbusiso Mvalese, artist and intern; and Hlengiwe Dlamini, artist and intern
Thursday, February 17, 12:30-2pm
808 Gallery (808 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston)

Gallery Talk with Malcolm Christian
Friday, February 25, 3-4pm
808 Gallery (808 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston)

Tim Hamill Visiting Artist Lecture: William Kentridge
Monday, February 28, 6:30pm
Morse Auditorium (602 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston)

Boston University College of Fine Arts Announces 100th BU Night at the Pops

April 24th, 2014 in CFA, Music.

School of Music junior, Nicholas Brown, selected as soloist for Symphony Hall concert filled with history and tradition

Boston, MA – Boston University College of Fine Arts is pleased to announce School of Music junior, Nicholas Brown, as clarinet soloist for 100th BU Night at the Pops — May 17th at Symphony Hall. Coinciding with the 141st Boston University Commencement, the BU Night at the Pops is one of BU’s oldest traditions, and an unforgettable way to celebrate the momentous occasion.

100th BU Night at the Pops
Date and Time: Saturday, May 17th, 8pm
Venue: Symphony Hall (301 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston, MA)
Tickets: Ticket Prices range from $24 to $92 per person.
Register

The Boston University Concerto Competition is in three parts. The first being students, from all programs in all performance areas and composition, are recommended by their respective studio teachers, followed by an audition process where each department selects no more than four semi-finalists. The semi-finalists then move on to the next round, performing before an outside panel of invited judges and musical luminaries in which four finalists are featured in the final Boston University Symphony Orchestra concert on April 29th at the Tsai Performance Center. From the group of winners, Keith Lockhart, conductor of the Boston Pops, selected junior Nicholas Brown as the soloist for BU Night at the Pops.

“Nicholas Brown, a junior from Maine, is a splendid choice for the 100th BU Night at the Pops,” said Ethan Sloane, Professor of Music at Boston University College of Fine Arts. “He is a deeply passionate player with a beautiful tone, secure facility, and a musical sophistication uncommon among undergraduates. He is a person of thoughtfulness, consideration, and unassuming ease. Recently selected as Associate Principal Clarinet of the esteemed Civic Orchestra of Chicago, Nick is emblematic of the manifold opportunities afforded by the commitment of Boston University to undergraduate education. I wish him every continued success in his musical development.”

Boston University College of Fine Arts Presents columbinus

April 24th, 2014 in CFA, Theatre.

School of Theatre at BU presents a theatrical discussion, a meeting of fact and fiction, sparked by the 1999 massacre at Columbine High School

Boston, MA – The School of Theatre at Boston University College of Fine Arts presents columbinus, a theatrical discussion of the 1999 massacre at Columbine High School — May 2–9 at Boston University Theatre.

columbinus

By the United States Theatre Project
Written by Stephen Karam and PJ Paparelli
Dramaturgy by Patricia Hersch
Conceived by PJ Paparelli
Directed by Clay Hopper
Dates: Friday, May 2nd – Friday, May 9th
Friday, May 2nd, 8pm
Saturday, May 3rd, 8pm
Sunday, May 4th, 2pm
Tuesday, May 6th, 7:30pm (ASL Interpreted and Talk-Back)
Wednesday, May 7th, 7:30pm (ASL Interpreted)
Thursday, May 8th, 7:30pm
Friday, May 9th, 8pm
Venue: Boston University Theatre (264 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA)

Box Office: 617.933.8600 or bostontheatrescene.com
(Tickets: $12 general public; $10 BU Alumni, WGBH and WBUR members, and Huntington Theatre subscribers; $6 CFA Membership; free with BU ID at the door, day of performance, subject to availability.)

“Last week, Easter Sunday fell on the 15th anniversary of the shootings at Columbine,” said Clay Hopper, director of columbinus. “It was this, along with the sad fact that since its inception, columbinus has only become more timely and relevant that made me feel this play needed to be produced again. Preferably with young people who might be too young to remember the shock and horror of that day, since now such violence has become all too commonplace in our culture.”

Sparked by the 1999 massacre at Columbine High School, this meeting of fact and fiction illuminates the realities of adolescent culture by exploring the events surrounding the shootings, with text drawn from interviews, public records, and the shooters’ private diaries. “The play is a beautiful response to that event, one that could only be possible within the medium of the theatre,” continued Hopper.

“In all my experience, I have never worked on a play that gets so deeply inside a literal event that it comes up with something intrinsic about us as humans.”

“A strong current of compassion and a need for understanding courses through it, an understanding that ultimately remains elusive because of the very nature of the event it grapples with,” continued Hopper. “I am constantly amazed at this play’s power and the depth of its compassion when confronted with no easy answers. It’s got a lot of heart. It’s bursting with it.”

Nestled amidst the Rocky Mountains, and a bastion of religious and political conservatism, Columbine, a district in Littleton Colorado, was by all accounts, the perfect community. The population was primarily white and upper-middle class. Columbine High School was well-known for its academic rigor; the student activities and programs were equally impressive.

There was, however, an underbelly to the beast that was noted amongst students of all social groups. Columbine High School was a typical school in terms of social hierarchy; jocks and cheerleaders stood at the top, outcasts at the bottom, leaving a majority of students that fell somewhere in between.

Just as this high school could be anywhere in America, so could the potential for a school shooting. In the days, weeks, and years following, the community, rocked by the shooting, sought an answer, a cause, something on which to blame the tragedy.

“The shooting at Columbine has been one of the most thoroughly researched and written about school shootings in history,” said Clay Hopper, director of columbinus. “Columbine haunts our nation’s consciousness, and despite years of research and some of the most extensive investigations made into a mass shooting, we are still so far from finding a definitive reason why Dylan and Eric did what they did. The play joins the books and plays already written about Columbine, embarking on the same search for answers, trying to glean some understanding from what can only be described as a senseless tragedy.”

Boston University College of Fine Arts Presents Don Giovanni

April 11th, 2014 in CFA, Music, Opera, Theatre.

Opera Institute and School of Theatre at BU close mainstage season with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s tale of seduction and abandonment – April 17-20

Boston, MA – The School of Music Opera Institute and the School of Theatre at Boston University College of Fine Arts present Don Giovanni, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s tale of seduction and abandonment — April 17-20, 2014.

Don Giovanni
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, composer
Lorenzo Da Ponte, librettist
William Lumpkin, conductor
Daniel Pelzig, guest stage director
Dates: Thursday, April 17 – Sunday, April 20, 2013
Thursday, April 17th, 7:30pm
Friday, April 18th, 7:30pm
Saturday, April 19th, 7:30pm
Sunday, April 20th, 2pm
Venue: Boston University Theatre (264 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA)
Box Office: 617.933.8600 or bostontheatrescene.com
(Tickets: $20 general public; $15 BU Alumni, WBUR and WGBH members, Huntington Theatre subscribers, and senior citizens; $10 CFA Membership; $5 students with valid ID. Two free tickets with BU ID at the door).

A classic story originally set in 18th Century Seville, Spain, BU School of Theatre and School of Music Opera Institute bring an evolved Don Giovanni into a contemporary dynamic space to tell this story. “The set is modern, the clothes are modern, and the attitudes are more modern than the era in which Moliere wrote his play or Mozart and DaPonte wrote their opera,” says Daniel Pelzig, Stage Director.

In the classic opera, Don Giovanni, with more than two thousand seductions behind him and no end in sight, becomes increasingly reckless as he descends into excess and immortality. But when his antics turn fatal and unrepentant, the women he has discarded seek revenge and it is ultimately served up by a hellish supernatural force.

“While Don Juan may meet his end, the tale itself seems eternal,” added Deborah Burton, Assistant Professor of Music at Boston University College of Fine Arts. “Whether it is the latest film takeoff (like 2013’s Don Jon) or an updated operatic performance, the echoes of the old story still resonate.”

“Seeing that the Opera Institute is a company of young and energetic singers, I only thought it appropriate to approach the opera with a youthful vibrancy and Gen-X edginess,” added Pelzig

“As we celebrate this year’s Keyword Transformation, we rededicate ourselves as performances, teachers, creators, and citizens to share the transformative power of art,” says William Lumpkin, Artistic Director of the Boston University Opera Institute. “Although the artistic journey is never complete, we proudly recognized this opportunity to proclaim the substance of this next generation of artists who will continue to transform the world.”

VENUE
Boston University Theatre
264 Huntington Avenue, Boston
Getting There:
T Green Line, E line, Symphony stop
T Orange Line, Mass Ave stop

INSTITUTIONAL BIOGRAPHY

Founded in 1839, Boston University is an internationally recognized private research university with more than 30,000 students participating in undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. BU consists of 17 colleges and schools along with a number of multi-disciplinary centers and institutes which are central to the school’s research and teaching mission. The Boston University College of Fine Arts was created in 1954 to bring together the School of Music, the School of Theatre, and the School of Visual Arts. The University’s vision was to create a community of artists in a conservatory-style school offering professional training in the arts to both undergraduate and graduate students, complemented by a liberal arts curriculum for undergraduate students. Since those early days, education at the College of Fine Arts has begun on the BU campus and extended into the city of Boston, a rich center of cultural, artistic and intellectual activity.

BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC BIOGRAPHY

The School of Music at the College of Fine Arts was established in 1872 to combine the intimacy and intensity of conservatory training with a broadly based, traditional liberal arts education at the undergraduate level and intense coursework at the graduate level. The school offers degrees in performance composition and theory, musicology, music education, collaborative piano, historical performance, as well as a certificate program in its Opera Institute, and artist and performance diplomas.

BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF THEATRE BIOGRAPHY

The School of Theatre at the College of Fine Arts was established in 1954 as one of the country’s leading institutions for the study of acting, stage management, design and production, and all aspects of the theatrical profession. Since 1982, the School of Theatre has enjoyed an educational and artistic collaboration with Huntington Theatre Company, the professional theatre-in-residence at Boston University. The School of Theatre is a conservatory-style training program within the larger liberal arts programs at Boston University, and values collaboration, a rigorous curriculum, artistic growth, and the exploration of new possibilities for theatre.

BOSTON UNIVERSITY OPERA INSTITUTE BIOGRAPHY

The Opera Institute at the School of Music at the College is an intensive, highly selective two-year performance-based training program for emerging operatic artists. A professional faculty and renowned guest artists provide personal support and training in all areas pertinent to a career in opera — voice, acting, languages, movement styles, and business strategies. In addition, the Opera Institute also selects singers from the School of Music who demonstrate true operatic potential and have mastered an intermediate integration of acting, vocal, and movement skills for the Opera Theater and Opera Workshop programs.

Boston University College of Fine Arts announces MFA Thesis Exhibitions 2014

April 10th, 2014 in CFA, Visual Arts.

Boston, MA – The School of Visual Arts at the College of Fine Arts (CFA) at Boston University is proud to announce MFA Thesis Exhibitions 2014, featuring the work of graduate students receiving their Master of Fine Arts (MFA) degree this spring.

MFA Thesis Exhibitions 2014

MFA Painting Exhibition
Dates: Friday, April 11 – Sunday, April 27, 2013
Opening Reception: Friday, April 11, 6–8pm
Location: 808 Gallery (808 Commonwealth Avenue)

MFA Graphic Design Exhibition
Dates: Friday, April 11 – Sunday, April 27, 2013
Opening Reception: Friday, April 11, 6–8pm
Location: Boston University Art Gallery at the Stone Gallery (855 Commonwealth Avenue)

MA Art Education Exhibition
Dates: Friday, April 11 – Sunday, April 27, 2013
Opening Reception: Friday, April 11, 6–8pm
Location: Gallery 5 (855 Commonwealth Avenue)

Exhibition and Gallery Events are Free and Open to the Public. All exhibition spaces are within easy walking distance of each other and visitors are encouraged to take a self-guided gallery tour.

MFA Painting Exhibition

Each student in the MFA Painting Program focuses on developing a personal artistic vision through commitment to studio practice. This vision is enriched through regular contact with the insights of a distinguished painting faculty, and complemented by lectures and studio visits by a diverse selection of contemporary visiting artists. Students acquire new painting techniques and explore ideas and images by generating paintings, drawings, and prints, which culminate in this exhibition.

School of Visual Arts students present concentrations in painting, sculpture, graphic design, and art education

MFA Graphic Design Exhibition

The intensive MFA Graphic Design Program is a conceptually based course of study consisting of regular critiques by a faculty of practicing designers, accompanied by rigorous training in advanced design technology. Students are encouraged to innovate, while maintaining and promoting the highest design standards, which staying abreast of contemporary developments in the graphic design field.

MA and BFA Art Education Exhibition

Students in the MA Studio Teaching and Art Education Programs concentrate on developing methods that teach children and adolescents to think visually and create art with personal meaning. The exhibition consists of the work students have done in intensive studio art classes, presented alongside work generated by their school pupils, and the personal teaching philosophies each student has developed through student teaching.

About the Art Galleries at Boston University

808 Gallery is located at 808 Commonwealth Avenue on the 1st Floor. Gallery hours are Tuesday – Friday from 11am–5pm, Thursday from 11am–5pm, and Saturday and Sunday from 1pm–5pm.

Boston University Art Gallery at the Stone Gallery is located at 855 Commonwealth Avenue on the 1st Floor of the College of Fine Arts. Gallery hours are Tuesday – Friday from 10am–5pm, and Saturday and Sunday from 1pm–5pm.

Gallery 5 is located at 855 Commonwealth Avenue on the 5th Floor of the College of Fine Arts. Gallery hours are Monday – Friday from 9am–5pm.

Galleries are located on the Boston University campus (BU West T stop on the “B” Green Line.)

Boston University Mourns the Passing of Marc Johnson Legendary Cellist, School of Music Professor, Former Member of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and Vermeer Quartet

April 10th, 2014 in CFA, Music.

Boston, MA – Boston University is mourning the passing of Marc Johnson, School of Music Adjunct Professor of Cello. Marc Johnson served on the faculty of the School of Music at Boston University since 2007.

“We will miss him greatly, his warm soul, his kindness, his generous spirit, and his beautiful cello playing,” said Richard Cornell, director ad interim of the School of Music at Boston University College of Fine Arts. “He taught us all so very much with each word and with each musical phrase. He made our lives immensely rich, and we were blessed to have him on our faculty.”

Born to a musical family in Lincoln, Nebraska, Johnson studied under the tutelage of Carol Work, winning several national competitions before being accepted as a scholarship student at the Eastman School of Music where he studied with Ronald Leonard and John Calentano. Johnson continued his studies at Indiana University where he was a student of Janos Starker and Josef Gingold.

Johnson began his professional career while still a student. At the age of eighteen, he became the youngest member of the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra. He continued to have success in competitions, winning first prize in the prestigious Washington International Competition, among others. Johnson was also a member of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, and for thirty-five years, Johnson performed as a cellist of the renowned Vermeer Quartet.

A memorial service in memory of Professor Johnson will be held in Autumn 2014.

Click here to read more about Professor Johnson

Boston University College of Fine Arts Named as One of “5 Tried-and-True Acting Colleges” by Backstage Magazine

April 3rd, 2014 in CFA, Theatre.

Boston, MA – The School of Theatre at the College of Fine Arts at Boston University was recently named as one of the “5 Tried-and-True Acting Colleges” in the United States by renowned performing arts magazine, Backstage.

The magazine applauded the School of Theatre for pushing actors “to be part of a play as well as understand the role their play takes on in the larger discussion.” The story lauded the philosophy of Jim Petosa, director of the School of Theatre and a CFA professor of directing and dramatic criticism for “ensuring the actors in his program weigh in the gravitas of their performances, understand the intellectual rigor they present in their characters, and work to contextualize themselves within the human condition, both through individual and collaborative ensemble work.”

“We’re very conscious of the theater as a force for understanding aspects of humanity, whether at a geopolitical level or at a local level,” says Petosa. “We’re not bound to one style or method, but we do tend to stress plays that really have an impact on our understanding of societal phenomenon.”

BU joins the ranks of Carnegie Mellon University, Rutgers University, New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, and the University of California, Los Angeles, in the Backstage list. For the complete article, visit Backstage magazine:

Boston University College of Fine Arts presents the Corpus Trombone Quartet

March 21st, 2014 in Music.

Four-city first U.S. Tour features the Boston University Trombone Choir — March 25th at the Tsai Performance Center

Boston, MA – The Boston University College of Fine Arts is pleased to host the Corpus Trombone Quartet in concert with the Boston University Trombone Choir— March 25th at the Tsai Performance Center.

Corpus Trombone Quartet in Concert
Featuring the Boston University Trombone Choir

Mar 25, 8pm
Hailing from Budapest, Hungary, the Corpus Trombone Quartet began in 2001 as trombone students of Professor Gustav Hona at the Franz Liszt Academy of Music, and today are among the highest level of brass chamber groups.
Tsai Performance Center
Free and Open to the Public

“The Corpus Trombone Quartet is an amazing group,” said Don Lucas, Chair of the Brass, Woodwind, and Percussion Department at the School of Music at Boston University College of Fine Arts. “They are prize-winners of international competitions. The members perform in major orchestras in Budapest, Hungary. We are honored to have them at Boston University as part of their four-city first U.S. tour. This will be a don’t-miss concert!”

The Corpus Trombone Quartet Biography
Members, Andras Suto (tenor trombone), Robert Kaip (tenor trombone), Peter Palinkas (tenor trombone), and Gorog-Hegyi Gabor (bass trombone) began in 2001 as trombone students of Professor Gustav Hona at the Franz Liszt Academy of Music in Budapest, Hungary. The quartet has performed in Japan, Egypt, Germany, France, Amsterdam, Hungary, and now the United States. They are members of the Hungarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, the Dohnaryi Symphony Orchestra, and the MAV Symphony Orchestra. The Corpus Trombone Quartet are first prize winners of the ITA International Trombone Quartet Competition, the Phillip Jones International Chamber Music Competition in Guebviler, France, the Jan Koetsier International Trombone Quartet Competition in Munich, Germany, and the Brass Chamber Music Competition, in Passau, Germany. The group was awarded both the Hungarian Chamber Ensemble of the Year and the Hungarian Stars Award in 2006, as well as Harry Fox Agency Awards in 2008 and 2011.

Boston University College of Fine Arts Remembers Boston Marathon at Symphony Hall

March 18th, 2014 in CFA, Music, Visual Arts.

One year later, BU Symphony Orchestra and Symphonic Chorus dedicate concert to victim LU Lingzi; Healing Boston Arts Reception and commemorating visual arts exhibition
celebrate the spirit of determination that unites Boston — April 7

Boston, MA – On Monday, April 7, at Boston’s Symphony Hall, the College of Fine Arts at Boston University will pay tribute to the victims and first responders of the tragic violence of last year’s Boston Marathon, while recognizing the remarkable efforts to heal the city through art.

Boston Healing Arts Reception and Concert at Symphony Hall

Performed by Boston University Symphony Orchestra and Symphonic Chorus
Conducted by Ann Howard Jones
With Soloist Christopher Hutchinson

Date and Time: Monday, April 7, 8pm
Healing Boston Arts Reception: 6pm
Featuring an exhibition of “Still Running: An Art Marathon for Boston,” curated by Taylor Mortell. Kindly RSVP to Brooke MacKinnon, brookelm@bu.edu or 617-353-3349.
Concert Program: Hector Berlioz, Grande Messe des Mortes, Op. 5
Location: Symphony Hall (301 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston)
Tickets: $25 General Admission; Student Rush: $10, available at the door, day of performance; One free ticket with BU ID at the door, day of performance, 10am–6pm
Box Office: bso.org or 617-262-1200
Live Webcast: The concert will be webcast live on the School of Music website and will be rebroadcast on the School of Music’s Virtual Concert Hall: bu.edu/cfa/music/virtual-concert-hall.

Among those lost that day was LU Lingzi (GRS ’14), a BU graduate student. Though pursuing a statistics degree, LU also studied piano at CFA because music brought her joy. The Boston University Symphony Orchestra and Symphonic Chorus are dedicating the annual spring concert in LU Lingzi’s memory.

“Music was part of her identity, just as LU was part of ours,” explains Benjamín Juárez, Dean of Boston University College of Fine Arts.

On this special evening, the College will host the Healing Boston Arts Reception, honoring the many ties the University has to the tragedy that occurred in Boston last April, applauding the remarkable efforts to heal the city, and celebrating the spirit of determination that unites Boston. The Healing Boston Arts Reception will feature an exhibition of Still Running: An Art Marathon for Boston, curated by Taylor Mortell (CFA ’16), celebrating Taylor’s efforts as well as the many efforts in the BU community to heal the city.

“Still Running: An Art Marathon for Boston is a greater Boston community art project originally created in response to the 2013 Boston Marathon tragedy,” says Taylor Mortell (CFA ’16), who curated the exhibition. “Since then, Still Running has grown into an ongoing series of free community art making events called ‘Art Marathons,’ where all are invited to come experience something new and create art with others to celebrate the city of Boston. The artwork created at our events and donated to Still Running first goes into a series of community art exhibitions in and around the city, and is later given to local hospitals and police stations as a way to give back to local law enforcement and show our appreciation.”

“It has been an incredible learning experience working on Still Running for the last year,” continues Mortell. “We had to learn how to become teaching artists, negotiators, curators, managing directors, and leaders as the project made demands for it. At the beginning, Luca de Gaetano, who co-created the project, and I had no idea what was possible or what we might be able to accomplish with this, and I think the reach it has had has far surpassed anything we could have imagined. We are very lucky.”

“We’ve heard it said that the arts community comes together during times of tragedy,” says Benjamín Juárez, Dean of Boston University College of Fine Arts. “In the days immediately following the Boston Marathon, I witnessed this first-hand. I am proud to honor the great work of our community in healing the city at this memorable event for Boston University and the city of Boston.”

Conducted by Ann Howard Jones, the BU Symphony Orchestra and Symphonic Chorus will perform Hector Berlioz’s Grande Messe des Mortes, Op. 5, a piece known for its complex, large-scale, and often grandiose instrumentations and its ties to Boston’s Symphony Hall. Recorded notably in Boston’s Symphony Hall in 1959, Berlioz’s Requiem is scored for a very large orchestra with offstage brass sections and choral groups placed throughout the venue.\

“Very often art and expression is inspired by what is happening in our world,” says Juárez. “Just as Berlioz was inspired by his world to create this masterpiece, the art created through Taylor’s Still Running project is an expression of the feelings and emotions of those touched by what happened a year ago in Boston. Art is that conduit.”

Boston University College of Fine Arts presents Leonard Nimoy: Secret Selves

March 18th, 2014 in Visual Arts.

Veteran actor takes photographic journey in portrait exhibition exploring the inner yearnings and fantasies of the residents of Northampton, MA
on view at the Sherman Gallery at Boston University — March 20 – May 9

Boston, MA – The School of Visual Arts at the College of Fine Arts (CFA) at Boston University is proud to present Leonard Nimoy: Secret Selves, the Star Trek actor’s photographic series exploring the inner yearnings and fantasies that we all share, on view at the Sherman Gallery at Boston University — March 20 – May 9.

Leonard Nimoy: Secret Selves
Dates and Events: Thursday, March 20 – Friday, May 9, 2014
Gallery Talk and Reception: Thursday, March 27, 5pm
Live Skype conversation with Leonard Nimoy and Rich Michelson, Owner/Director of R. Michelson Gallery
Location: Sherman Gallery at Boston University (775 Commonwealth Avenue, Second Floor)
Exhibition and Gallery Events are Free and Open to the Public

Inspired by Aristophanes’ theory that humans were once double-sided creatures with two heads and multiple limbs before Zeus divided humans in two, Nimoy’s project reveals his subjects’ other, or second self. Nimoy recruited portrait models with an open call to be photographed posed and dressed as their true or imagined “secret selves.”

“Leonard’s instructions were minimal,” said Rich Michelson, Owner and Director of R. Michelson Gallery. “The ‘self we keep hidden from others’ and ‘the self we would really like to be’ might be one and the same,’ he suggested. ‘I leave it to the subject to decide what they want to show to the camera.’”

Gathering 100 subjects from all walks of life: artists and clergy, as well as politicians and business owners, Nimoy asked each of them the question: Who do you think you are? Each subject was recorded as Nimoy interviewed them and created a portrait of their “alternate identity.” The resulting large-scale portraits offer an intimate, sometimes humorous, and profound new look at the residents of Northampton, MA.

Secret Selves is one of Nimoy’s three concurrent exhibitions in Boston spanning 60 years of work. The Griffin Museum in Winchester will exhibit Shekina in their Digital Silver Imaging satellite gallery from March 20th to May 8th, and Gallery 555 in Boston will exhibit Eye Contact from March 27th to May 3rd.

About Leonard Nimoy
Leonard Nimoy first experienced the magic of making photographic images as a teenager in the early 1940s. His darkroom was the family bathroom in their small Boston apartment. His subjects were family and friends. He studied at UCLA under Robert Heineken in the early 1970s and later received an “artist in residence” appointment at the American Academy in Rome. Nimoy’s photography is included in many museum collections, including The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, The Judah L. Magnes Museum, The LA County Museum of Art, the Jewish Museum of NY, The New Orleans Museum of Fine Art, and The Hammer Museum. Besides his rising stature as a major contemporary American photographer, in his spare time, Nimoy moonlights as an actor, director, philanthropist, and as one of the world’s best loved and respected personalities, Mr. Spock.

About Sherman Gallery at Boston University
The Sherman Gallery at Boston University is located at 775 Commonwealth Avenue on the 2nd Floor of the George Sherman Union. The gallery is located on the Boston University campus (BU Central T stop on the “B” Green Line.) Gallery hours are Tuesday-Friday from 11:00am-5:00pm, and Saturday and Sunday from 1:00pm-5:00pm. For more information, visit bu.edu/cfa.

Institutional Biography

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Boston University Center for New Music Hosts Artist in Residence Joan Tower

March 14th, 2014 in Music.

Residency with lauded Grammy Award-winning composer to include 75th Birthday Celebration Portrait Concert by the Muir String Quartet — March 28

Boston, MA – The Center for New Music at the Boston University College of Fine Arts welcomes Grammy Award-winning composer Joan Tower for the second of season’s three residencies — March 25–29, 2014. The Muir String Quartet will perform, Joan Tower at 75, a portrait concert in celebration of the lauded American composer’s 75th birthday — March 28th at the CFA Concert Hall.

This concert will feature major chamber works from Tower’s illustrious career, performed by Boston University College of Fine Arts Artist in Residence, Muir String Quartet, the group with which she has collaborated most closely.

“This is a rare occasion to hear a creator performed by her muses,” said Joshua Fineberg, Director of the Center for New Music at Boston University College of Fine Arts. “The Muir String Quartet and Joan Tower have a multi-decade close collaboration and it is a fitting tribute to this very important composer. We are honored to have Joan visit Boston University three times this season, working with students and faculty, and bringing her music and ideas to the greater Boston community.”

Joan Tower at 75
Residency and 75th Birthday Celebration Portrait Concert with the Muir String Quartet
Mar 28, 8pm
with CFA Faculty Members Peter Zazofsky (violin), Lucia Lin (violin), Steven Ansell (viola), and Michael Reynolds (cello). Pieces to include:
String Quartet No. 5
“Rising” for Flute and String Quartet
String Force for Solo Violin
Piano Quartet
CFA Concert Hall

Joan Tower will return to Boston University for her final residency this season, April 23–25, hosting a lecture in Composer’s Forum, as well as a public masterclass, and closing with a concert at Boston University’s Tsai Performance Center.

Located within a thriving music school, the Boston University Center for New Music seeks to enhance the presence of cutting edge music within the curriculum while encouraging awareness of new music to the BU arts community. To widen the conversation within the greater university, the Center hosts lectures, demonstrations, and performances that are open to the public, providing a forum for broader interdisciplinary involvement. To that end, the Center also hosts several institutional collaborations, including a partnership with the Boston-based contemporary music sinfonietta Sound Icon, and selected concerts that are staged at off-campus venues.

JOAN TOWER BIOGRAPHY
Joan Tower is widely regarded as one of the most important American composers living today. During a career spanning more than fifty years, she has made lasting contributions to musical life in the United States as composer, performer, conductor, and educator. Her works have been commissioned by major ensembles, soloists, and orchestras, including the Emerson, Tokyo, and Muir quartets; soloists Evelyn Glennie, Carol Wincenc, David Shifrin, and John Browning; and the orchestras of Chicago, New York, St. Louis, Pittsburgh, and Washington DC, among others. Tower was the first composer chosen for a Ford Made in America consortium commission of sixty-five orchestras. Leonard Slatkin and Nashville Symphony recorded Made in America in 2008 (along with Tambor and Concerto for Orchestra). The album collected three Grammy Awards: Best Classical Contemporary Composition, Best Classical Album, and Best Orchestral Performance. In 1990, Tower became the first woman to win the prestigious Grawemeyer Award for Silver Ladders, a piece she wrote for the St. Louis Symphony where she was Composer-in-Residence from 1985–88. Other residencies with orchestras include a
10-year residency with the Orchestra of St. Luke’s (1997–2007) and the Pittsburgh Symphony (2010–11). She is in residence as the Albany Symphony’s Mentor Composer partner in the 2013–14 season.

MUIR STRONG QUARTET BIOGRAPHY
In its 35th season, the Muir String Quartet has long been acknowledged as one of the world’s most powerful and insightful ensembles, distinguishing itself among audiences and critics with its “exhilarating involvement” (The Boston Globe), “impeccable voicing and tonation” (San Francisco Examiner), and “unbridled musicality” (American Record Guide). Winner of the 1981 Naumburg Chamber Music Award and 1980 Evian International String Quartet Competition, the Muir String Quartet first appeared on the scene in 1980, and was greeted with rave reviews and an extensive feature in The New Yorker. The Muir String Quartet has been in residence at Boston University College of Fine Arts since 1983, and gives annual summer workshops at the Boston University Tanglewood Institute (BUTI). The Muir String Quartet has also given masterclasses at schools worldwide, including the Eastman School of Music, the Curtis Institute, Oberlin Conservatory, the Shepherd School of Music at Rice University, and conservatories in Beijing, Shanghai, and Xian, China. Since 1989, the quartet has presented the Emerging Quartets and Composers Program in Utah, with eminent composer, Joan Tower. The program is now part of the Muir String Quartet’s role as resident chamber ensemble with the Deer Valley Festival, in partnership with the Utah Symphony/Opera.