Victor Mathieux

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Whenever a drop of water falls into a puddle it creates ripples which are much bigger than the original drop. I think this is a good metaphor for the power that individuals have to change the world around them. As designers we can be especially powerful.

Victor Mathieux graduated from School of Visual Arts in 2011 as a graphic design major with a minor in business. Based on a project he created in his senior year at BU, Victor developed Everest, an app that helps people set goals and move toward achieving their dreams.

What first led you to study Graphic Design at Boston University?
I’ve been drawing since before I could talk and making websites since I was 12. I’ve always been passionate about taking things from my imagination and turning them into something that exists in reality. Surprisingly, I was originally planning on going to Engineering and Business school but my dad nudged me to consider studying Art since I had always been passionate about it. After considering the idea, it seemed as though studying Graphic Design was an obvious choice. I decided on BU specifically because they also had a solid Business program for me to minor in.

Where did the idea for your current project, Everest, originate?
Everest.com was a natural progression from a project I launched while at BU called A Goal Planner. The idea came from an observation that we all have things we want to do in our lives, places we want to go, and skills we want to master. Every human being wants to feel as though they are growing and progressing in some way — that’s where the idea really comes from.

Everyone’s got their Everest, we just want to help people climb theirs. We think the world would be a much better place that way.

On your personal website you say that you believe there’s no separation between creating a better self and a better world. How do you think this philosophy fits into the realm of design?
Whenever a drop of water falls into a puddle it creates ripples which are much bigger than the original drop. I think this is a good metaphor for the power that individuals have to change the world around them. As designers we can be especially powerful. Our work can be used to shape our environments and the behaviors of the people around us. In turn, our surroundings end up shaping us. Outside of your mind, there really is no separation between you and your environment — so take care to do work you believe in because it holds great influence.

Screenshot of the Everest app

What one piece of advice would you give to young designers who are just starting out?
In short, do great work and surround yourself with great people. What I mean by this, is to do work that you think is great — work you care about. See every assignment your teachers give you as a way to do something that only you could do… don’t just “fulfill the assignment.” Your work is a gift, and the world needs your gift in its best and purest form. Start a side project that involves you designing something. It doesn’t matter if it’s related to music, video games, entrepreneurship, whatever — just do something you care about AND share it with the world. By sharing your work, you’ll get feedback and start to build a following of people that believes in what you believe. The best way to start doing something you think is impossible is to surround yourself with people that are already doing it.

What’s next for you?
For now, Everest is my Everest (to get a bit meta) and I’m going to keep working on unlocking the potential of those around me. I’m especially interested in getting people to unlock their creative potential. I think doing this often requires valuing courage over success, so I’m going to try and do more of that myself.