Category: Opera

Boston University College of Fine Arts School of Music Opera Institute and School of Theatre present 18th Annual Fall Fringe Festival

September 26th, 2014 in CFA, Music, Opera, Theatre

Featuring new or rarely performed significant works in the opera and theatre canon, October 8–26

Boston, MA – For 18 years, Boston University College of Fine Arts annual Fringe Festival has been a popular fixture in CFA’s fall event schedule. A collaboration between the School of Music Opera Institute and the School of Theatre, the festival’s mission is to produce new or rarely performed significant works in the opera and theatre repertoire, bringing performers and audiences together in unique theatrical settings.

This year’s festival kicks off with The Whitmores, running October 8–11, a BU New Play Initiative production by Ben Ducoff (CFA ‘15). Directed by CFA Acting Professor Michael Hammond, the play centers on an awkward dinner party that descends into madness when the hosts attempt to convince the help to murder their guests.

The festival continues with the John Musto’s Later the Same Evening, with music direction by Allison Voth and stage direction by Jason King Jones, running October 18–19. Inspired by five Edward Hopper paintings: Room in New York, Hotel Window, Hotel Room, Two on the Aisle, and Automat, the opera explores the lives of the characters depicted in each painting while simultaneously interweaving them over the course of one evening in New York City.

The festival concludes with Peter Brook’s La Tragédie de Carmen, running October 25–26. Adapted from Georges Bizet’s opera by Marius Constant, Jean-Claude Carrière, and Peter Brook, with stage direction by School of Theatre Director Jim Petosa, the opera is a story of a doomed romance between a sensuous gypsy and Don Jose, a Spanish soldier whom she lures into her world. A 14-piece on stage chamber orchestra, conducted by William Lumpkin, artistic director of the Opera Institute, will accompany the opera.

Learn more about the 18th Annual Fringe Festival at bu.edu/cfa/fringe.

FRINGE FESTIVAL SCHEDULE

The Whitmores
Ben Ducoff, playwright
Michael Hammond, director
An awkward dinner party descends into madness when the hosts attempt to convince the help to murder their guests.
BU Theatre, Lane-Comley Studio 210
Wednesday, October 8, 7:30pm
Thursday, October 9, 7:30pm
Friday, October 10, 8pm
Saturday, October 11, 2pm (Talk-Back), 8pm

Later the Same Evening
John Musto, composer
Mark Campbell, librettist
Allison Voth, music director
Jason King Jones, stage director
Inspired by five Edward Hopper paintings: Room in New York, Hotel Window, Hotel Room, Two on the Aisle, and Automat, the opera explores the lives of the characters depicted in each painting while simultaneously interweaving them over the course of one evening in New York City.
BU Theatre, Lane-Comley Studio 210
Saturday, October 18, 2pm, 7:30pm
Sunday, October 19, 2pm, 7:30pm

La Tragédie de Carmen
Peter Brook, composer
William Lumpkin, conductor
Jim Petosa, stage director
Adapted from Georges Bizet’s opera by Marius Constant, Jean-Claude Carrière, and Peter Brook, the opera is a story of a doomed romance between a sensuous gypsy and Don Jose, a Spanish soldier whom she lures into her world. A 14-piece on stage chamber orchestra will accompany the opera. Sung in French with English supertitles.
BU Theatre, Lane-Comley Studio 210
Saturday, October 25, 2pm, 7:30pm
Sunday, October 26, 2pm, 7:30pm

TICKETS
Tickets now on sale: $7 general admission; $3.50 CFA Membership; one free ticket with BU ID at the door, day of performance, subject to availability. Box Office: bu.edu/cfa/fringe or 617.933.8600.

Boston University College of Fine Arts Preview of 2014–2015 Season Highlights

August 28th, 2014 in Alumni, BUAG, CFA, Music, Opera, Theatre, Visual Arts

Boston, MA – Boston University College of Fine Arts (CFA) is proud to announce its 2014–2015 season, featuring concerts, plays, operas, exhibitions, and lectures from CFA’s Schools of Music, Theatre, and Visual Arts. Every year, faculty and staff from the College identify a selection of events from each discipline to highlight among the hundreds of performances and visual arts events presented through the academic year.

At CFA, faculty and staff are as concerned with the process as they are with the performance or finished piece, and this year’s events celebrate this with initiatives and programming. Commencing CFA’s Keyword Initiative’s fourth year, much of the College’s programming, discussions, and collaborations will revolve around an annual theme, or keyword, and this year, the keyword is intersect. The Keyword Initiative is a project funded by Nancy Livingston (COM ’69) and her husband, Fred Levin, through the Shenson Foundation, in memory of Ben and A. Jess Shenson.

Since 1954, the CFA community has experienced milestones in history, technological innovation, and enormous social change. In marking its 60th Anniversary, the College will present a range of works that will energize the creative discussion around the 2014–2015 Keyword: Intersect, focusing on how art, academia, and society cross and divide — including an operatic exploration into the lives of the characters depicted in five Edward Hopper paintings in Later the Same Evening, a historical comedy set in the 1880s about marriage, love, and electricity in In the Next Room, or the Vibrator Play, and Convergence, the School of Visual Arts’ first large-scale alumni exhibition showcasing alumni working in a variety of media and at all stages of career.

Click here to download the 2014/2015 Season Brochure

“Evolution is not always easy; but these moments of synergy and tension are the wellspring of artistic creation and academic achievement,” said Benjamín Juárez, Dean, College of Fine Arts, Boston University. “As we explore how the arts reconcile traditions of the past with an ever-evolving present, we welcome you to join CFA in this investigation into time and space, this reflection on history, and this contemplation of the future.”

SEASON SCHEDULE

Todd Hido: Excerpts from Silver Meadows (Sep 5 – Oct 19)

The exhibition features over 100 of the internationally renowned photographer’s most recent works. Hido’s work is cinematic in scope, and offers a darkly dramatic glimpse into a world that reflects both the alienation and dislocation of suburban America and the inspiration of noir film and literature. A major new monograph published by Nazraeli Press accompanies the exhibition.
Opening Reception Thursday, September 4, 6–8pm
Boston University Art Gallery at the Stone Gallery
Free and open to the public. Call 617-353-3329 or visit bu.edu/cfa for more information.

Muir String Quartet (Oct 6)

In Residence at Boston University
Hugo Wolf: Italian Serenade
Leoš Janáček: String Quartet No. 2, Italian Letters
Tsai Performance Center
Free and open to the public. Call 617-353-8725 or visit bu.edu/tsai for more information.

18th Annual Fringe Festival (Oct 8–26)

Featured Productions

The Whitmores * || NPI
Oct 8–11
Ben Ducoff, playwright | Michael Hammond, director
An awkward dinner party descends into madness when the hosts attempt to convince the help to murder their guests.

Later the Same Evening * ||
Oct 18–19
John Musto, composer | Mark Campbell, librettist
Allison Voth, music director | Jason King Jones, stage director
Inspired by five Edward Hopper paintings: Room in New York, Hotel Window, Hotel Room, Two on the Aisle, and Automat, the opera explores the lives of the characters depicted in each painting while simultaneously interweaving them over the course of one evening in New York City.

La Tragédie de Carmen * ||
Oct 25–26
Peter Brook, composer
William Lumpkin, conductor | Jim Petosa, stage director
Adapted from Georges Bizet’s opera by Marius Constant, Jean-Claude Carrière, and Peter Brook, the opera is the story of a doomed romance between a sensuous gypsy, and Don Jose, a Spanish soldier whom she lures into her world. A 14-piece on-stage chamber orchestra will accompany the opera. Sung in French with English supertitles.

BU Theatre, Lane-Comley Studio 210
$7 general admission; $3.50 CFA Membership; one free ticket with BU ID at the door, day of performance, subject to availability. Box Office: bu.edu/cfa/fringe or 617-933-8600.

Convergence: School of Visual Arts Alumni Exhibition

(Oct 24 – Dec 14) 60th ||
The School of Visual Arts presents its first large-scale alumni exhibition showcasing alumni working in a variety of media and at all stages of career. Guest curated by New York-based artist Andrea Champlin.
Opening Reception Friday, October 24, 6–8pm
808 Gallery
Free and open to the public. Call 617-353-3371 or visit bu.edu/cfa for more information.

A Celebration of Marc Johnson

(Nov 3)
A tribute to Marc Johnson, beloved cello faculty member, featuring performances by the Muir String Quartet, the String faculty of BU School of Music, and alumni.
CFA Concert Hall
Free and open to the public. Call 617-353-8790 or visit bu.edu/cfa for more information.

Craft and Modernity: Professional Women Artists in Boston

(Nov 7 – Dec 21) ||
This exhibition considers craft across media and documents women’s contributions to artistic thought that have been minimized in the art historical discourse. Organized by Boston University Adelson Fellow Caroline Riley.
Opening Reception Thursday, November 6, 6–8pm
Boston University Art Gallery at the Stone Gallery
Free and open to the public. Call 617-353-3329 or visit bu.edu/cfa for more information.

BCAP Presents An Evening of One Acts

(Nov 12–23) * BCAP
BCAP presents this evening of one-acts from two of the most celebrated playwrights of the 20th century. Directed by Clay Hopper.

Krapp’s Last Tape
Samuel Beckett, playwright | Featuring Sidney Friedman

The Dumb Waiter
Harold Pinter, playwright | Featuring Michael Hammond

BU Theatre, Lane-Comley Studio 210
$20 general admission; $15 seniors, students, and groups (10+); $10 CFA Membership; free with BU ID, at the door, day of performance, subject to availability. Box Office: bu.edu/cfa/bcap or 617-933-8600

Contemporary Perspectives Lecture Series: Josephine Halvorson

(Nov 17) ||
Josephine Halvorson creates intimate paintings of objects from everyday life, seen close-up. Her subtle, muted images of doorframes, gravestones, blackboards, stoves, and industrial machinery carry a surprising human softness, as details and imperfections reveal themselves through the process of slow looking to address history, perception, and our relationship to the built environment.
Jacob Sleeper Auditorium
Free and open to the public. Call 617-353-3371 or visit bu.edu/cfa for more information.

BU Symphony Orchestra and Symphonic Chorus at Symphony Hall

(Nov 24) *||
Benjamin Britten: War Requiem
David Hoose, conductor, BU Symphony Orchestra
Ann Howard Jones, conductor, BU Symphonic Chorus
Featuring Anthony Trecek-King, artistic director, Boston Children’s Chorus
Symphony Hall
Tickets on sale 60 days in advance; $25 general admission; $12.50 CFA Membership; Student rush $10, available at the door, day of performance, 10am–6pm. Box Office: bso.org or 617-262-1200.

In the Next Room, or the Vibrator Play

(Dec 10–14) *||
Sara Ruhl, playwright | Adrienne Boris, director
A comedy about marriage, intimacy, and electricity. Set in the 1880s at the dawn of the electricity, and based on the bizarre historical fact that doctors used vibrators to treat “hysterical” women (and some men), the play centers on a doctor and his wife and how this new therapy affects their entire household.
BU Theatre, Lane-Comley Studio 210
$12 general admission; $6 CFA Membership; free with BU ID, at the door, day of performance, subject to availability. Box Office: bostontheatrescene.com or 617-933-8600.

The Human Comedy

(Dec 12–18) *||
Books and Lyrics by William Dumaresq
Music by Galt MacDermot | Jim Petosa, director
With music by MacDermot (Hair) and based on William Saroyan’s novel, this musical is a pop folk opera and coming-of-age tale about small-town life in World War II era California. Sponsored in part through the Stewart F. Lane and Bonnie Comely Musical Theatre Fund and dedicated to the memory of Boston University’s former first lady, Jasmine Chobanian.
Calderwood Pavilion at the BCA, Wimberly Theatre
$12 general admission; $6 CFA Membership; free with BU ID, at the door, day of performance, subject to availability. Box Office: bostontheatrescene.com or 617-933-8600.

Muir String Quartet

(Jan 23)
In Residence at Boston University
Leoš Janáček: String Quartet No. 1, Kreutzer Sonata
Claude Debussy: String Quartet in G Minor
Tsai Performance Center
Free and open to the public. Call 617-353-8725 or visit bu.edu/tsai for more information.

School of Visual Arts Faculty Exhibition

(Jan 29 – Mar 29) ||
Presenting the work of over thirty artists who currently teach at the University, this exhibition features a wide range of visual practices, spanning genres and media, from realism to abstract, two to three dimensions, and small to large scale.
Opening Reception Thursday, January 29, 6–8pm
808 Gallery
Free and open to the public. Call 617-353-3371 or visit bu.edu/cfa for more information.

Dignity: Tribes in Transition

(Jan 30 – Mar 29) ||
A collection of iconic black and white portraits by Los Angeles-based photographer, Dana Gluckstein, focusing on cultures on the cusp of modernization and decimation as a consequence of discriminatory policies and economic exploitation.
Opening Reception Thursday, January 29, 6–8pm
Boston University Art Gallery at the Stone Gallery
Free and open to the public. Call 617-353-3329 or visit bu.edu/cfa for more information.

Contemporary Perspectives Lecture Series: Stefan Sagmeister

(Feb 12) ||
The New York-based graphic designer’s bold style and careful sense of craft expands to photography, video, bookmaking, murals, installation, and more. He has designed album covers for Lou Reed, OK Go, The Rolling Stones, David Byrne, and Aerosmith.
Morse Auditorium
Free and open to the public. Call 617-353-3371 or visit bu.edu/cfa for more information.

Uncle Jack

(Feb 12 – Mar 1) * || BCAP NPI
Michael Hammond, playwright
In this modern-day retelling of Anton Chekhov’s Uncle Vanya, Uncle Jack, his niece Sonya, and his British brother-in-law Derek struggle to save their small summer theatre company in the Berkshires. Jack fires a keepsake pistol, Derek runs for cover, and hearts are broken. Co-produced by BCAP and Boston Playwrights’ Theatre.
BU Theatre, Lane-Comley Studio 210
$30 general admission; $25 seniors and groups (10+); $15 CFA Membership; $10 students; free with BU ID, at the door, day of performance, subject to availability. Box Office: bu.edu/cfa/bcap or 617-933-8600

Angels in America

(Feb 19–22) * ||
Peter Eötvös, composer | Mari Mezei, librettist
Based on the play by Tony Kushner
William Lumpkin, conductor | Jim Petosa, stage director
This opera tells the story of everyday human experience: relationships, love, loss, cowardice, and courage, set during the early stages of the AIDS pandemic in 1980’s New York City. Sung in English with supertitles.
Boston University Theatre
$20 general public; $15 BU Alumni, WGBH and WBUR Members, Huntington Theatre subscribers, and senior citizens; $10 CFA Membership; $5 students with ID, two free tickets with BU ID at the door, day of performance, subject to availability. Box Office: bostontheatrescene.com or 617-933-8600.

Wit (Feb 20–28)

* || BCAP
Margaret Edson, playwright | Sidney Friedman, director
Featuring Judy Braha, Mark Cohen, and Paula Langton
Vivian Bearing, respected professor of English, has built a career studying the metaphysical sonnets of John Dunne. Diagnosed with terminal ovarian cancer, Bearing’s stint as a prize patient in an experimental chemotherapy trial pushes her to reassess her life and work with profundity and humor. Winner of the 1999 Pulitzer Prize for drama.
Calderwood Pavilion at the BCA, Roberts Theatre
$20 general admission; $15 seniors, students, and groups (10+); $10 CFA Membership; free with BU ID, at the door, day of performance, subject to availability. Box Office: bu.edu/cfa/bcap or 617-933-8600

Contemporary Perspectives Lecture Series: Mickalene Thomas in Conversation with Anna Stothart

(Mar 16) ||
New York-based artist Mickalene Thomas in conversation with Anna Stothart, assistant curator at The Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston. Thomas’ portraits of black women and studies of interiors embrace cultural and spatial fragmentation, creating a kaleidoscopic vision that recasts traditional notions of beauty, gender, race, and representation.
Morse Auditorium
Free and open to the public. Call 617-353-3371 or visit bu.edu/cfa for more information.

Muir String Quartet

(Mar 30)
In Residence at Boston University
Antonín Dvořák: Cypresses, B. 11
Samuel Barber: Dovwer Beach
James Demler, baritone
Bedřidch Smetana: String Quartet No. 1
Tsai Performance Center
Free and open to the public. Call 617-353-8725 or visit bu.edu/tsai for more information.

BU Symphony Orchestra and Symphonic Chorus at Symphony Hall

(Apr 7) *
Gustav Mahler: Symphony No. 2, Resurrection
David Hoose, conductor, BU Symphony Orchestra
Ann Howard Jones, conductor, BU Symphonic Chorus
Symphony Hall
Tickets on sale 60 days in advance; $25 general admission; $12.50 CFA Membership; Student rush $10, available at the door, day of performance, 10am–6pm. Box Office: bso.org or 617-262-1200.

Cendrillon

(Apr 16–19) * ||
Jules Massenet, composer | Henri Caïn, librettist
William Lumpkin, conductor | E. Loren Meeker, stage director
Massenet’s ethereal opera carries the audience into a dreamlike world of enchantment in this well-known fairy tale about a young girl wronged and her ultimate redemption through her discovery of true love. Sung in French with English supertitles.
Boston University Theatre
$20 general public; $15 BU Alumni, WGBH and WBUR Members, Huntington Theatre subscribers, and senior citizens; $10 CFA Membership; $5 students with ID, two free tickets with BU ID at the door, day of performance, subject to availability. Box Office: bostontheatrescene.com or 617-933-8600.

The Cripple of Inishmaan

(Apr 29 – May 3) *||
Martin McDonagh, playwright | Thomas Martin, director
A dark comedy in the great tradition of Irish storytelling set on a remote Irish island in 1934. As word arrives on Inishmaan that a Hollywood director is coming to the neighboring island of Inishmore to film Man of Aran, the one person who wants to be in the film more than anybody is young Cripple Billy, if only to break away from the bitter tedium of his daily life.
BU Theatre, Lane-Comley Studio 210
$12 general admission; $6 CFA Membership; free with BU ID, at the door, day of performance, subject to availability. Box Office: bostontheatrescene.com or 617-933-8600.

* = CFA Membership includes half-price tickets to these events
|| = a KEYWORD: Intersect event
60th = 60th Anniversary Celebration
BCAP = Boston Center for American Performance
NPI = New Play Initiative

All artists and programs are subject to change. Please visit bu.edu/cfa for the most up to date schedules and program information.

VENUES

The Art Galleries at Boston University
Visit bu.edu/cfa/visual-arts for gallery hours.
• Boston University Art Gallery at the Stone Gallery | 855 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
• 808 Gallery | 808 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
GETTING THERE T Stop Green Line, B line, BU West stop
BU Bus Stop M2 or C7

Boston University Theatre
264 Huntington Avenue, Boston
• BU Theatre
• Steward F. Lane and Bonnie Comley Studio 210
GETTING THERE T Stop Green Line, E line, Symphony stop | Orange Line, Mass Ave stop
BU Bus Stop M6 or C2

Calderwood Pavilion at the Boston Center for the Arts
527 Tremont Street, Boston
• Wimberly Theatre
GETTING THERE T Stop Green Line, Copley stop | Orange Line, Back Bay stop |
Silver Line, SL4 or SL5 stop
BU Bus Stop M6 or C2
College of Fine Arts at Boston University
855 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
• CFA Concert Hall
GETTING THERE T Stop Green Line, B line, BU West stop
BU Bus Stop M2 or C7

Jacob Sleeper Auditorium
871 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
GETTING THERE T Stop Green Line, B Line, BU West stop
BU Bus Stop M2 or C7

Morse Auditorium
602 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
GETTING THERE T Stop Green Line, B Line, Blandford St stop
BU Bus Stop M4 or C5

Symphony Hall
301 Massachusetts Avenue, Boston
GETTING THERE T Stop Green Line, E line, Symphony stop | Orange Line, Mass Ave stop
BU Bus Stop M6 or C2

Tsai Performance Center
685 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston
GETTING THERE T Stop Green Line, B Line, BU Central stop
BU Bus Stop M2 or C7

Boston University College of Fine Arts Presents Don Giovanni

April 11th, 2014 in CFA, Music, Opera, Theatre

Opera Institute and School of Theatre at BU close mainstage season with Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s tale of seduction and abandonment – April 17-20

Boston, MA – The School of Music Opera Institute and the School of Theatre at Boston University College of Fine Arts present Don Giovanni, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s tale of seduction and abandonment — April 17-20, 2014.

Don Giovanni
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, composer
Lorenzo Da Ponte, librettist
William Lumpkin, conductor
Daniel Pelzig, guest stage director
Dates: Thursday, April 17 – Sunday, April 20, 2013
Thursday, April 17th, 7:30pm
Friday, April 18th, 7:30pm
Saturday, April 19th, 7:30pm
Sunday, April 20th, 2pm
Venue: Boston University Theatre (264 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA)
Box Office: 617.933.8600 or bostontheatrescene.com
(Tickets: $20 general public; $15 BU Alumni, WBUR and WGBH members, Huntington Theatre subscribers, and senior citizens; $10 CFA Membership; $5 students with valid ID. Two free tickets with BU ID at the door).

A classic story originally set in 18th Century Seville, Spain, BU School of Theatre and School of Music Opera Institute bring an evolved Don Giovanni into a contemporary dynamic space to tell this story. “The set is modern, the clothes are modern, and the attitudes are more modern than the era in which Moliere wrote his play or Mozart and DaPonte wrote their opera,” says Daniel Pelzig, Stage Director.

In the classic opera, Don Giovanni, with more than two thousand seductions behind him and no end in sight, becomes increasingly reckless as he descends into excess and immortality. But when his antics turn fatal and unrepentant, the women he has discarded seek revenge and it is ultimately served up by a hellish supernatural force.

“While Don Juan may meet his end, the tale itself seems eternal,” added Deborah Burton, Assistant Professor of Music at Boston University College of Fine Arts. “Whether it is the latest film takeoff (like 2013’s Don Jon) or an updated operatic performance, the echoes of the old story still resonate.”

“Seeing that the Opera Institute is a company of young and energetic singers, I only thought it appropriate to approach the opera with a youthful vibrancy and Gen-X edginess,” added Pelzig

“As we celebrate this year’s Keyword Transformation, we rededicate ourselves as performances, teachers, creators, and citizens to share the transformative power of art,” says William Lumpkin, Artistic Director of the Boston University Opera Institute. “Although the artistic journey is never complete, we proudly recognized this opportunity to proclaim the substance of this next generation of artists who will continue to transform the world.”

VENUE
Boston University Theatre
264 Huntington Avenue, Boston
Getting There:
T Green Line, E line, Symphony stop
T Orange Line, Mass Ave stop

INSTITUTIONAL BIOGRAPHY

Founded in 1839, Boston University is an internationally recognized private research university with more than 30,000 students participating in undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. BU consists of 17 colleges and schools along with a number of multi-disciplinary centers and institutes which are central to the school’s research and teaching mission. The Boston University College of Fine Arts was created in 1954 to bring together the School of Music, the School of Theatre, and the School of Visual Arts. The University’s vision was to create a community of artists in a conservatory-style school offering professional training in the arts to both undergraduate and graduate students, complemented by a liberal arts curriculum for undergraduate students. Since those early days, education at the College of Fine Arts has begun on the BU campus and extended into the city of Boston, a rich center of cultural, artistic and intellectual activity.

BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF MUSIC BIOGRAPHY

The School of Music at the College of Fine Arts was established in 1872 to combine the intimacy and intensity of conservatory training with a broadly based, traditional liberal arts education at the undergraduate level and intense coursework at the graduate level. The school offers degrees in performance composition and theory, musicology, music education, collaborative piano, historical performance, as well as a certificate program in its Opera Institute, and artist and performance diplomas.

BOSTON UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF THEATRE BIOGRAPHY

The School of Theatre at the College of Fine Arts was established in 1954 as one of the country’s leading institutions for the study of acting, stage management, design and production, and all aspects of the theatrical profession. Since 1982, the School of Theatre has enjoyed an educational and artistic collaboration with Huntington Theatre Company, the professional theatre-in-residence at Boston University. The School of Theatre is a conservatory-style training program within the larger liberal arts programs at Boston University, and values collaboration, a rigorous curriculum, artistic growth, and the exploration of new possibilities for theatre.

BOSTON UNIVERSITY OPERA INSTITUTE BIOGRAPHY

The Opera Institute at the School of Music at the College is an intensive, highly selective two-year performance-based training program for emerging operatic artists. A professional faculty and renowned guest artists provide personal support and training in all areas pertinent to a career in opera — voice, acting, languages, movement styles, and business strategies. In addition, the Opera Institute also selects singers from the School of Music who demonstrate true operatic potential and have mastered an intermediate integration of acting, vocal, and movement skills for the Opera Theater and Opera Workshop programs.

Boston University College of Fine Arts School of Music, Opera Institute, and School of Theatre present Florencia en el Amazonas

January 13th, 2014 in CFA, Music, Opera

Daniel Catán’s opera about love, redemption, and transformation, February 20-23

Boston, MA – Boston University College of Fine Arts presents Florencia en el Amazonas, the second opera composed by Daniel Catán. Produced by BU School of Music, Opera Institute, and School of Theatre, the production runs February 20-23, 2013 at the Boston University Theatre.

FLORENCIA EN EL AMAZONAS
Composed by Daniel Catán
Libretto by Marcela Fuentes‐Berain
William Lumpkin, Conductor
Nic Muni, Stage Director

A work of great beauty and power, Daniel Catán’s Florencia en el Amazonas is the composer’s second opera. Loosely inspired by Gabriel García Márquez’s Love in the Time of Cholera, the opera follows the story of Florencia Grimaldi, an aging opera singer who embarks upon a steamboat journey down the Amazon River. As the journey progresses, the boat is beset by pink rain, foul waters, and the threat of a cholera epidemic. As Florencia and her fellow travelers are carried deeper into the jungle, they experience various revelations, until finally the diva’s spirit is transformed into a vast, emerald butterfly.

Boston University Theatre, 264 Huntington Avenue, Boston
Thursday, February 20, 7:30pm
Friday, February 21, 7:30pm
Saturday, February 22, 7:30pm
Sunday, February 23, 2pm

“While rooted in the operatic tradition of Puccini, Catán’s opera evokes the exotic world of the Amazon jungle where Florencia has come to face her past and her future,” explains William Lumpkin, conductor of the production and Artistic Director of Boston University Opera Institute.

Boston University College of Fine Arts soprano, Katrina Galka, playing the role of “Rosalba” in Florencia en el Amazonas, was recently awarded Second Place Winner 2014 in the New England Regional Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions.

Boston University is hosting two special guests in the days preceding the performances. Andrea Puente, the widow of Daniel Catán, and Marcela Fuentes-Berain, the librettist for the opera, arrive to Boston University on Monday, February 17. Puente and Fuentes-Berain will host a discussion about Catán and his opera on Wednesday, February 19, 4:00pm-5:30pm at the Opera Institute, 808 Commonwealth Avenue.

Sung in Spanish with English supertitles, Florencia en el Amazonas is a featured event of the Boston University College of Fine Arts Keyword Initiative, now in its third year. The 2013–2014 initiative, focusing on the KEYWORD: Transformation, will explore profound shift and change in individuals and society through a series of performances and events that tap into diverse perspectives, and create dialogue that inspires humanity and breeds critical thinking that leads to solutions.

TICKETS
Tickets now on sale: $20 general admission; $15 BU Alumni, WGBH members, Huntington Subscribers, senior citizens; $10 CFA Membership; $5 Students with valid ID; two free tickets with BU ID at the door, subject to availability.
Tickets available on BostonTheatreScene.com

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Boston University College of Fine Arts School of Music Opera Institute and School of Theatre present 17th Annual Fall Fringe Festival

September 23rd, 2013 in CFA, Music, Opera, Theatre

Featuring new or rarely performed significant works in the opera and theatre repertoire, October 4–27

Boston, MA – For 17 years, the Boston University College of Fine Arts annual Fringe Festival has been a popular fixture in CFA’s fall event schedule. A collaboration between the School of Music Opera Institute and the School of Theatre, the festival’s mission is to produce new or rarely performed significant works in the opera and theatre repertoire, bringing performers and audiences together in unique theatrical settings.

Conducted by CFA’s William Lumpkin with stage direction by School of Theatre Director Jim Petosa, this year’s festival kicks off with Jonathan Dove’s one-act opera, Siren Song , running October 4–6. Inspired by Gordon Honeycombe’s novel, Dove first brought the extraordinary story of Dave Palmer to the Almeida Opera Theatre stage in 1994. A 70-minute work for five singers, an actor, and an orchestra of ten players, Siren Song is a bizarre, true story of a young sailor on the HMS Ark Royal who exchanges letters with a woman he believes to be a beautiful and successful model. As their romantic and passionate relationship develops, a meeting proves increasingly difficult to arrange; the character of Diana, the model whom Dave sees so vividly in his mind, does not exist.

“I fell in love with Jonathan’s opera, Flight, when I had the pleasure of conducting its American premiere,” said William Lumpkin, Artistic Director of the School of Music Opera Institute at the College of Fine Arts at Boston University, and conductor for this season’s performance of Siren Song. “It has been a delight to come back to his earlier opera, Siren song, and to discover some of the germs of Flight. The music is serene and captivating, much like Diana herself, and even though she may be a figment of Davey’s imagination, the effect is real and unrelenting. Although composed long before the existence of online matchmaking, Dove’s opera seems timely in this age of Facebook and other online tools where identities and personalities can ultimately turn out to be entirely different than expected.”

“Jonathan Dove and Nick Dear create a sensual, provocative, and chilling tale that takes us into the rabbit hole of one man’s imaginations,” continued Jim Petosa, Director of the School of Theatre at the College of Fine Arts at Boston University, and stage director for season’s performance of Siren Song, “where illusions of love conjure powerfully destructive delusions of self.”

Welcoming back guest stage director, David Gately, the lineup continues with Nico Muhly’s Dark Sisters, with music direction by Allison Voth, playing October 11-13. Premiered in 2011, Dark Sisters conjures an atmosphere of stifling oppression. The work focuses on five “sister-wives” in a polygamous Mormon compound, all married to a stern “Prophet” who uses the language of righteousness to hold them in fearful bondage. An alumnus of the Boston University Tanglewood Institute, Muhly is enjoying a moment in the New York City spotlight as a contemporary classical composer and arranger. Muhly’s opera, Two Boys is making its Metropolitan Opera debut this fall.

The festival concludes with a presentation of the great American playwright Sam Shepard’s Back Bog Beast Bait, October 22–27. One of Shepard’s lesser known works, the one-act Back Bog Beast Bait follows a two-headed “pig beast” who is ravaging the Louisiana countryside. A terrorized mother summons Slim and his sidekick, Shadow, to slay the Beast. School of Theatre Assistant Professor Michael Hammond, a Broadway veteran and former faculty at Shakespeare & Company in Lenox, Massachusetts, will direct.

Learn more about the 17th Annual Fringe Festival at bu.edu/cfa/fringe.

FRINGE FESTIVAL SCHEDULE
Siren Song
Jonathan Dove, composer
Nick Dear, libretto
William Lumpkin, conductor
Jim Petosa, stage director
Based on the novel of the same name by Gordon Honeycombe, Dove tells the story of a love-starved sailor who becomes entangled in an affair with a pen pal he believes to be a lonely young woman, but who turns out to be a deceitful and callous man. A one-act opera sung in English.
BU Theatre, Lane-Comley Studio 210
Friday, October 4, 7:30pm
Saturday, October 5 2pm, 7:30pm
Sunday, October 6, 2pm
Dark Sisters
Nico Muhly, composer
Stephen Karam, libretto
Allison Voth, music director
David Gately, stage director
Dark Sisters follows on woman’s dangerous attempt to escape the FLDS Church (Fundamentalists Latter Day Saints), a sect that split from mainstream Mormonism following the renunciation of polygamy. A one-act opera sung in English.
BU Theatre, Lane-Comley Studio 210
Friday, October 11, 7:30pm
Saturday, October 12, 2pm, 7:30pm
Sunday, October 13, 2pm
Back Bog Beast Bait
Sam Shepard, playwright
Michael Hammond, director
In this one-act play, a young mother calls on two cowboys to slay the two-headed “pig beast” terrorizing the Louisiana countryside.
BU Theatre, Lane-Comely Studio 210
Tuesday, October 22, 7:30pm
Wednesday, October 23, 7:30pm
Thursday, October 24, 7:30pm
Saturday, October 26, 8pm
Sunday, October 27, 2pm
TICKETS

Tickets now on sale: $7 general admission; $3.50 CFA Membership; one free ticket with BU ID at the door, subject to availability. Box Office: bu.edu/cfa/fringe or 617.933.8600.

Boston University College of Fine Arts presents the 2013 Design & Production Exhibition

May 7th, 2013 in CFA, Opera, Theatre

A behind the scenes tour of undergraduate and graduate School of Theatre work

Boston, MA – The School of Theatre at the College of Fine Arts (CFA) at Boston University is proud to announce the 2013 Design & Production Exhibit, calling attention to the work of undergraduate and graduate students in Design, Production, and Management.

Design & Production Exhibit

Dates: Monday, May 6 – Friday, May 10
Open House: Monday, May 6, 6–8pm
Location: CFA, 1st Floor Studios
Exhibition and Gallery Events are Free and Open to the Public.

The Design & Production Exhibit is a behind the scenes look at how stage managers and technical directors collaborate to realize a design team’s vision.

CFA, 1st Floor Studios are located at 855 Commonwealth Avenue on the 1st Floor. Studio hours are 10am–5pm. For more information, visit bu.edu/cfa.

Boston University College of Fine Arts presents three students with prestigious Esther B. and Albert S. Kahn Career Entry Awards

April 30th, 2013 in CFA, Music, Opera, Theatre

In addition, first-year MFA candidate awarded Joseph Ablow Memorial Painting Prize

Boston, MA – Boston University College of Fine Arts is pleased to announce the winners of this year’s Esther B. and Albert S. Kahn Career Entry Award: Tiffany Chang from School of Music for orchestral conducting, Sam Tilles from the School of Theatre for acting, and Luca de Gaetano from the School of Visual Arts for painting. The winners each received $10,000 grants to help them transition into artistic careers following their graduation later this month. The awards were presented on Friday by Benjamín Juárez, Dean of Boston University College of Fine Arts.

Tiffany Chang

plans to use the award money to provide powerful leadership and dedication to the New England Repertory Orchestra (NERO), Chang’s entrepreneurial project for development and networking opportunities for young and pre-professional musicians. Chang is originally from Taipei, Taiwan. She attended Oberlin Conservatory of Music where she completed a Master of Music Education, as well as a Bachelor of Music in both Cello Performance and Music Education and minors in Composition and Music Theory. While at BU, Chang has been deeply involved with the BU All-Campus Orchestra, Boston University Tanglewood Institute (BUTI) Youth Artists Orchestra, and BU Opera Institute. Chang held previous conducting positions with Boston Youth Symphony Orchestras (BYSO) and the North End Music and Performing Arts Center.

Sam Tilles

plans to use the award money to assemble and support a team of devisors, and establish a workspace to finish writing Exit, Pursued by a Bear, Tilles’ work that is inspired by social reform that is relevant here and now. The story wrestles with questions, emotions, and conflicts associated with the Climate Crisis. He plans to produce the play in early 2015, hopefully launching The Boston Mosaic Theatre company, a new theatre collective dedicated to giving emerging young actors, directors, playwrights, musicians, dramaturgs, dancers, scene designers, sound designers, costume designers, light designers, and martial artists an opportunity to perform and utilize their talent. Tilles is currently completing his BFA in Acting with a minor in Philosophy. His previous training includes the London Academy of Music and Dramatic Arts (LAMDA), The Overlake School, and Seattle Children’s Theatre Young Actor Institute. While at BU, Tilles has performed in Buried Child, ERIN-GO-BRAGH-less, Measure for Measure, Hedda Gabler, Lord of the Flies, and God’s Ear.

Luca de Gaetano

plans to use the award money to establish a studio space and professional practice to continue developing his strengths with solid bodies of work, to further connect with the Boston art scene, and to be present in the community to show his work and to engage with a broader audience after graduation. Informed by being foreign, homeless, and emotionally strained, de Gaetano’s work often addresses, with irony, the uncanny, the ugly, the “carnival-esque,” and the demented, as facets of a deeper celebration, the one for the painful and yet marvelous research for the meaning of life. Previously, de Gaetano received a Post-Baccalaureate Certificate at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts (SMFA), Boston, and a Master degree in Architecture from Politecnico di Milano in Milan Italy. While enrolled at SMFA, de Gaetano showed his work in the Annual student show, the “Figure It Out” show, and the “Inside Out” show. While at BU, de Gaetano was the awarded the Constantin Alajolav Scholarship in 2011, 2012, and 2013. He has been included in several group painting shows in Boston including Next Generation V, Juried Show at Huret & Spector Gallery, Emerson College, and Fresh Impressions: prints from the BU MFA program at Sherman Gallery. He was also the winner of the Gamblin prize at the 2012 Boston Young Contemporaries exhibition.

The Esther B. and Albert S. Kahn Career Entry Award Fund

was established in 1985 with an endowed contribution of $1 million from Esther Kahn (SED ’55, Hon. ’86). Each spring, students completing their last semester of graduate or undergraduate studies are eligible to compete for the award. Deborah Kahn and Linda Green, the daughters of the late Esther and Albert Kahn, along with a faculty panel from CFA, select winners from throughout CFA to be awarded grants of $10,000. Kahn Award recipients have gone on to enjoy successful careers including singers, Stephen Salters, Dominique LaBelle, and Kelly Kaduce; violinist Mira Wang, actors Russell Hornsby and Ellen Harvey, scenic designer Antje Ellerman, designer Bethany Shorb, and painter Nicholas Lamia.

Joseph Ablow Memorial Painting Prize

In addition to the Kahn Award, Dean Juárez awarded first-year MFA Painting candidate, Noah Sussman, with the Joseph Ablow Memorial Painting Prize in honor of Joseph Ablow, who died on November 14, 2012, at the age of 84. Professor Ablow taught at Boston University College of Fine Arts for more than four decades. Ablow studied painting at Harvard University, Bennington College, and the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, as well as with renowned master painters Oskar Kokoschka and Ben Shan. His personal attention and care of his students, something remembered by all who were fortunate to study with him, is well known. The School of Visual Arts is honored to have had Joseph Ablow at its helm as a one-time Director and Professor, and this memorial prize will continue to bestow honor on his memory.
Sussman is a Boston-based artists, born and raised in Cambridge. He graduated from Skidmore College, in Saratoga Springs, NY, in 2007, and has since maintained a steady studio practice in the Boston area.

Boston University College of Fine Arts Community Finds Healing through Art

April 23rd, 2013 in Alumni, CFA, CFA Newsmakers, Music, Opera, Theatre, Visual Arts

Above: In the wake of the tragedy that occurred at the Boston Marathon, College of Fine Arts Dean Benjamín Juárez talks about the duty of the arts community at Boston University to create “pockets of hope” in this difficult time.

Schools of Music, Theatre, and Visual Arts students demonstrate resilience in responding to tragic violence of Boston Marathon, new artistic outreach program aides in Boston Medical Center patients’ recovery

Boston, MA – In response to the tragic violence of the Boston Marathon and the succeeding events the devastating week brought forth, students at Boston University College of Fine Arts (CFA) are joining together to help those injured, and to help one another.

Among those lost that day was LU Lingzi (GRS ’14), a BU graduate student. Though pursuing a statistics degree, LU also studied piano at CFA because music brought her joy. Music was part of her identity, just as LU was part of ours.

With three lives lost, hundreds injured, and thousands stunned, students at CFA’s Schools of Music, Theatre, and Visual Arts have demonstrated resilience. Through the Arts Outreach Initiative, an unprecedented partnership between the Boston University Medical Campus and CFA to build productive relationships between artistic creativity and health care practices, students are stepping forth to use their individual crafts to help the 23 victims being treated at Boston Medical Center, BU’s affiliated academic hospital.

“Since last October, the Arts Outreach Initiative, has been articulating an ongoing artistic presence in the Medical Campus, with special emphasis at Boston Medical Center,” says Moisès Fernández Via, Project Curator & Researcher for the Arts Outreach Initiative. “At this very moment, BMC is providing care to patients injured at the Boston Marathon. Surgical and Trauma units are dealing with exceptional levels of stress and anxiety. Nurses and staff are working under an exceptionally overloaded emotional context.”

In the face of the extraordinary circumstances of that tragic week, the next generation of artists shares a message of hope, resilience, and collaboration. “For the Arts Outreach Initiative, this exceptional moment demands an exceptional response — understanding that not only medical care is required at this point, but stress relief, consolation, and empathy,” continued Fernández Via.

Almost immediately, students from the School of Visual Arts launched Still Running: An Art Marathon for Boston, an open call for art to celebrate strength and raise money. And, in a remarkable spirit of community, both casts of the Opera Institute’s production of La Clemenza di Tito, shared their final performance with one cast performing Act 1, and the alternate cast performing Act 2. Music and Theatre students are also responding to the devastation, performing for patients injured at the Marathon, and staff at BU Medical Campus, as part of the new outreach initiative, are focusing on artistic intervention.

“We’ve heard it said that the arts community comes together during times of tragedy,” says Benjamín Juárez, Dean of Boston University College of Fine Arts. “In the days immediately following the Boston Marathon, I witnessed this first-hand.”

Educating the Citizen Artist is central to CFA’s mission. Since September, CFA has celebrated this with initiatives and programming. Commencing CFA’s Keyword Initiative’s second year, much of the College’s programming, discussions, and collaborations have revolved around the annual theme, or keyword, of resilience — the buoyancy of the human spirit in times of war, tragedy, hardship, suffering, and oppression. The Keyword Initiative is a project funded by Nancy Livingston (COM ’69) and her husband, Fred Levin, through the Shenson Foundation, in memory of Ben and A. Jess Shenson.

“None of us could have predicted the relevance of CFA’s KEYWORD: ‘Resilience’ before the tragic events of April 15th,” continues Dean Juárez. “Wounded, the city of Boston mourned, and did what this great city, the birthplace of America, has done before: it grew stronger, more resilient, and I am so proud to say that our CFA community did the same.”

As CFA’s community of Citizen Artists continue to demonstrate the power of art in the healing process, please visit bu.edu/cfa for ongoing updates and more information.

Boston University College of Fine Arts Presents La Clemenza di Tito

April 16th, 2013 in CFA, Music, Opera, Theatre

UPDATE: Tickets for Friday’s performance will be honored at the two remaining performances: Saturday, April 20 at 7:30pm and Sunday, April 21 at 2pm. Please bring Friday tickets to the BU Theatre box office for ticket exchange. Thank you.

Boston, MA – The School of Music Opera Institute and the School of Theatre at Boston University College of Fine Arts present La Clemeza di Tito, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s penultimate opera — April 18-21, 2013. Read the recent BU Today article.

La Clemeza di Tito
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, composer
Caterino Mazzolá after Pietro Metastasio, librettist
William Lumpkin, conductor Daniel Pelzig, guest stage director
Dates and Times: Thursday, April 18 – Sunday, April 21, 2013
Venue: Boston University Theatre (264 Huntington Avenue, Boston, MA)
Box Office: 617.933.8600 or bostontheatrescene.com
(Tickets: $20 general public; $15 BU Alumni, WBUR and WGBH members, Huntington subscribers, and senior citizens; $5 students with valid ID. Two free tickets with BU ID at the door. Free Admission with Military ID).

La Clemenza di Tito is driven by paranoia and manipulation which culminates in a conflicted ruler’s struggle to discover the greater power of mercy over revenge. Battling allegiances and sexual manipulation constitute the tale — a determined and seductive Vitellia casts her sights on the Emperor Tito, but turns incensed when Tito chooses to marry someone else, charging her devoted admirer, Sesto, to assassinate the emperor, to whom Sesto is a devout confidant.

“From loyalty to manipulation to forgiveness, Mozart’s profound score is an immaculate representation of the volatile and intense interrelationships amongst the six characters in the story,” said William Lumpkin, Acting Director and Associate Professor of Music at the School of Music Opera Institute at the College of Fine Arts at Boston University, and conductor for the production of La Clemenza di Tito.

Forced to choose between his allegiance to his friend and leader, and his passion for the mesmerizing Vitellia, Sesto sets forth on a course of destructiveness, proving to be the ultimate test of the benevolent Tito’s capacity for forgiveness.

Commissioned in 1791 to celebrate the coronation of Leopold II, Holy Roman Emperor as King of Bohemia, La Clemenza di Tito would prove to be Mozart’s final operatic composition; Mozart died later that same year. In BU’s homage to the time and place — and in the spirit of Mozart — Bu has steeped the production in the style and sensibilities of Prague in 1791, infusing it with contemporary design elementes reflective of the story’s poignancy in today’s society.

VENUE
Boston University Theatre
264 Huntington Avenue, Boston
Getting There:
T Green Line, E line, Symphony stop
T Orange Line, Mass Ave stop

CFA Stages a Compelling Cry for Peace Boston premiere of Britten’s Gothic opera Owen Wingrave

February 26th, 2013 in CFA, Opera

By Susan Seligson
Jorgeandres Camargo (CFA’14) (from left), John Slack (CFA’14), Isaac Bray (CFA’14), Heejae Kim (CFA’14), and Peter Brown (CFA‘15) perform in the College of Fine Arts production of the Benjamin Britten opera Owen Wingrave, which opens tonight at the BU Theatre. Photos by Oshin Gregorian
Benjamin Britten’s rarely produced opera Owen Wingrave is a searing, tragic tale of an unlikely pacifist born into a family of soldiers. Britten, an avowed pacifist himself, was commissioned to write the work not for the stage, but for television, where it debuted in 1971 on Britain’s BBC2—a challenge for anyone staging the opera today, says Jim Petosa, stage director of the current at the production of the opera at the Boston University Theatre. The production takes the small screen narrative and interprets it in a way that “yields different riches on the large stage” of the BU Theatre, says Petosa. Playing tonight through Sunday, the collaboration between the College of Fine Arts School of Theatre and Opera Institute marks the opera’s Boston premiere as well as the centennial of Britten’s birth.

Based on a short story by Henry James and written during the throes of the Vietnam War, Owen Wingrave was first performed live at the Royal Opera House at London’s Covent Garden in 1973. The opera swirls around Owen Wingrave’s efforts to avoid military service. The young Wingrave prefers peace to the brutal carnage of his military family and ancestors. “In peace I have found my image,” sings Wingrave, being played in alternating performances by baritones Nickoli Strommer (CFA’14) and Isaac Bray (CFA’14). Cast out by his family and his lover, who accuse him of cowardice, Wingrave is locked on a dare in the haunted bedroom of his ancestral home, where the ghosts of his forebears Colonel Wingrave and his son (who in his day also refused to fight, and was killed by the Colonel) are said to roam. There Owen meets his tragic end.
Read the full article on BU Today