Boston University College of Fine Arts Presents Buried Child and Anne Boleyn

in CFA, Theatre
December 14th, 2012

Closing the second quarter on BU stages is the classic work of Sam Shepard
alongside a modern piece by England’s Howard Brenton — December 11–16

Boston, MA – Opening December 11, the School of Theatre at Boston University College of Fine Arts (CFA) closes its second quarter with Sam Shepard’s classic work, Buried Child, alongside an amateur production of England’s Howard Brenton’s modern piece, Anne Boleyn.

Buried Child
Sam Shepard, playwright
Jacob Titus, director
Tuesday, December 11 – Sunday, December 16
Tuesday, December 11, 7:30pm (Opening Night)
Wednesday, December 12, 7:30pm
Thursday, December 13, 7:30pm Talk Back
Friday, December 14, 8pmTalk Back
Saturday, December 15, 2pmTalk Back
Sunday, December 16, 7:30pmTalk Back
BU Theatre, Lane-Comley Studio 210

Winner of the Pulitzer Prize for Drama, this story chronicles an alcoholic patriarch, his adulterous wife, their two children, and the demise of the “American Dream.”

Anne Boleyn
Howard Brenton, playwright
Emily Ranii, director
Tuesday, December 11 – Sunday, December 16
Tuesday, December 11, 7:30pm (Opening Night)
Wednesday, December 12, 7:30pm
Thursday, December 13, 10am Student Matinee and Talk-Back
Thursday, December 13, 7:30pmTalk Back
Friday, December 14, 8pmTalk Back
Saturday, December 15, 8pmTalk Back
Sunday, December 16, 2pmTalk Back
Calderwood Pavilion at the BCA, Wimberly Theatre

A severed head, a love story, a chest full of secrets, and a conspiracy theory befitting the most infamous of Henry VIII’s wives, this century-hopping look at Anne Boleyn’s impact on religion on England premiered at Shakespeare’s Globe in 2010.

“Developing and presenting new work for the theatre is at the core of our mission,” said Jim Petosa, Director of the School of Theatre at the College of Fine Arts at Boston University. “To that end, at the Calderwood Pavilion at the BCA, we are proud to present Howard Brenton’s Anne Boleyn, which premiered at Shakespeare’s Globe in 2010, alongside Sam Shepard’s Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece about the demise of the American Dream, Buried Child, in our intimate Lane-Comley Studio 210.”

In the 1970s, at a time when the United States was periled by high unemployment rates, the oil crisis, wars, and negative reactions to the growing popularity of an eccentric, nonconformist lifestyle, playwright Sam Shepard penned his Pulitzer Prize-winning piece, Buried Child. Regarded as a representation of an era, Buried Child reflects timeless themes, like the tension between breaking one’s history and accepting it, and the struggle to spiritually connect to one’s existence — and, in a sense, American mythology.

“As in the 1970s, we are disillusioned with the American Dream whose plausibility and beauty seem to have faded long ago,” says Gabriela Nicolescu, dramaturg who assisted third-year MFA Directing candidate, Jacob Titus in directing this production. “However, we are holding on to this dream and to our heroes, and the deeper they fall, the more desperate we become.”

According to Shepard, the unearthing of buried secrets causes the breakdown of family values. “During the past year, we saw the fall of Joe Paterno and Lance Armstrong, whom we idolized and somehow identified with,” continued Nicolescu. “Secrets they fought so hard to conceal came to light, and their image is forever changed.”

In Buried Child, Sam Shepard forces the audience to ask the question of how one finds their place in the world when the illusion of right versus wrong created by these “American gods” is destroyed.

Howard Brenton’s Anne Boleyn premiered at the Shakespeare’s Globe in 2010 in celebration of the four hundredth anniversary of the King James Bible. Culminating third-year MFA Directing candidate, Emily Ranii’s thesis work brings the story of a severed head, a love story, a chest full of secrets, and the conspiracy theory befitting the most infamous of Henry Viii’s wives to life in the amateur production of Anne Boleyn, a story that reverberates across centuries.

“Described by Brenton as a ‘history play for now,’ Anne Boleyn explores how to live justly in a world in which translation, interpretation, and self-interest obscure one’s words-to-live-by,” reflected Ranii. “According to Brenton, ‘Anne Boleyn is the tyranny of the word of God. It is meant to free you. But interpret it wrongly — that is against the interpretation of the men with swords or guns — and it can kill.”

Tickets: $12 general admission; $10 BU Alumni, Huntington Theatre Subscribers, WGBH members, students, senior citizens, and groups; Free with BU ID.

Box Office: BostonTheatreScene.com or 617.933.8600

INSTITUTIONAL BIOGRAPHY
Founded in 1839, Boston University is an internationally recognized private research university with more than 30,000 students participating in undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs. BU consists of 17 colleges and schools along with a number of multi-disciplinary centers and institutes which are central to the school’s research and teaching mission. The Boston University College of Fine Arts was created in 1954 to bring together the School of Music, the School of Theatre, and the School of Visual Arts. The University’s vision was to create a community of artists in a conservatory-style school offering professional training in the arts to both undergraduate and graduate students, complemented by a liberal arts curriculum for undergraduate students. Since those early days, education at the College of Fine Arts has begun on the BU campus and extended into the city of Boston, a rich center of cultural, artistic and intellectual activity.

BOSTON UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF FINE ARTS SCHOOL OF THEATRE BIOGRAPHY
The School of Theatre at the College of Fine Arts was established in 1954 as one of the country’s leading institutions for the study of acting, stage management, design and production, and all aspects of the theatrical profession. Since 1982, the School of Theatre has enjoyed an educational and artistic collaboration with Huntington Theatre Company, the professional theatre-in-residence at Boston University. The School of Theatre is a conservatory-style training program within the larger liberal arts programs at Boston University, and values collaboration, a rigorous curriculum, artistic growth, and the exploration of new possibilities for theatre.

MEDIA ONLY
To request interviews, high resolution photos, or additional information, please contact either:
Brooke MacKinnon at 617.353.3349 or brookelm@bu.edu
Laurel Homer at 617.353.8783 or lhomer@bu.edu