Proposal Criteria and Format

All proposals must:

1. Be submitted by a department and involve a team of faculty rather than an individual instructor,
2. Demonstrate the department’s commitment to systemic change and ownership of the redesigned course.
3. Have a clear and convincing plan for the sustainability of the course (with appropriate plans for continuous improvement).
4. Involve modern assessment methods, to enable longitudinal studies of the learning outcomes of the students.
5. Target a course that will:

a. Use a common syllabus across all sections.

b. Use common materials across all sections.

c. Use common exams and assignments across all sections.

d. Actively engage students in the learning process.

e. Involve course-specific training for any teaching assistants.

f. Employ innovative pedagogies.

Proposals will involve a two-step process.

1) Pre-Proposals: On May 14, 2010, two-page (approx. 600 words) pre-proposals will be due from departments who wish to compete for the awards. These will briefly describe the course to be re-designed, list the team of faculty members (at least three) to be involved in the preparation of the full proposal, and confirm the commitment by the department to submit a full proposal if selected to do so.

Please note that only one pre-proposal may be submitted by each department, and these pre-proposals must be endorsed (but not ranked) by the relevant Dean. Departments whose pre-proposals are selected will receive $15,000 to support the development of the full proposal.  Decisions on which pre-proposals have been selected will be announced by June 1, 2010.

2) Full Proposals will be due on October 15, with the announcement of successful proposals made by November 1, 2010.  Successful projects will receive funding of up to $30,000 per year for up to three years to fund a team of faculty to redesign, develop, and teach the new courses. This funding can be used to “buy out” faculty time, for purchase of equipment and technologies, for travel to conferences, for hiring consultants, etc.   The key requirements of the proposal should include:

  • The submission by a department and the involvement of a team of faculty rather than an individual instructor, to demonstrate the department’s commitment to systemic change and ownership of the redesigned course.
  • A clear and convincing plan for the sustainability of the course (with appropriate plans for continuous improvement).
  • The building in of modern assessment methods, to enable longitudinal studies of the learning outcomes of the students.
  • The targeting of a course that will:
    • Use a common syllabus across all sections.
    • Use common materials across all sections.
    • Use common exams and assignments across all section.
    • Actively engage students in the learning process.
    • Involve course-specific training for any teaching assistants.
    • Employ innovative pedagogies.

A plan for the organization of the proposal is as follows:

  1. A description of the current course, what about it works well, and where there are significant opportunities to improve (up to 4 pages).
  2. A brief description of innovative pedagogies employed for similar courses at other colleges or universities (up to 4 pages).
  3. An outline of all aspects—lecturers, demonstrations, labs, discussion sections, TA training, etc.-of the new course (up to 5 pages).
  4. A statement of the department’s goals for the revised course and metrics that will be used to assess and measure success (up to 3 pages).
  5. A budget (up to 2 pages).

Please use the Full Proposal Cover Page and attach it to the proposal.

Proposals will not be expected to define details of the revision but rather to outline the vision for the course redesign and to reflect the department’s commitment to the effort and to the new, team-taught model.