Publications

Rebecca Seston Schillaci & Deborah Kelemen (2014) Children’s Conformity When Acquiring Novel Conventions: The Case of Artifacts, Journal of Cognition and Development, 15:4, 569-583, DOI: 10.1080/15248372.2013.784973 PDF

Rottman, J., Kelemen, D., & Young, L. (in press). Hindering harm and preserving purity: How can moral psychology save the planet? Philosophy Compass. PDF

Rottman, J., Kelemen, D., & Young, L. (2014). Purity matters more than harm in moral judgments of suicide: Response to Gray (2014). Cognition. doi:10.1016/j.cognition.2014.06.008. PDF

Kelemen, D., Emmons, N., Seston, R. & Ganea, P. (2014). Young children can be taught basic natural selection using a picture storybook intervention. Psychological Science, published online 6 February 2014, doi:10.1177/0956797613516009. [PDF]

Rottman, J., Kelemen, D., & Young, L. (2014).  Tainting the soul: Purity concerns predict moral judgments of suicide. Cognition, 130, 217-226. PDF

Emmons, N. & Kelemen, D. (2014). The development of children’s pre-life reasoning: Evidence from two cultures. Child Development, 2014. PDF

Rottman, J. & Kelemen, D. (2014). The morality of martyrdom and the stigma of suicide. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, in press. [Commentary].PDF.

Kelemen, D., Rottman, J. & Seston, R. (2013). Professional physical scientists display tenacious teleological tendencies. Purpose-based reasoning as a cognitive default. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, 142(4), 1074-1083. PDF

Kelemen, D. (2012). Teleological minds: How natural intuitions about agency and purpose  influence learning about evolution. In K. S. Rosengren, S. K. Brem, E. M. Evans & G. M. Sinatra (Eds.), Evolution challenges: Integrating research and practice in teaching and learning about evolution. Oxford: Oxford University Press. PDF

Rottman, J. & Kelemen, D. (2012). Aliens behaving badly: Children’s acquisition of novel purity-based morals. Cognition, 124, 356–360. PDF

Rottman, J. & Kelemen, D. (2012). Is there such a thing as a Christian child? Evidence of religious beliefs in early childhood. In P. McNamara and W. Wildman (Eds.), Science and the world’s religions: Persons and Groups. Santa Barbara, CA: Praeger Press. PDF

Kelemen, D., Seston, R. & St. Georges, L. (2012). The designing mind: Children’s reasoning about intended function and artifact structure. Journal of Cognition and Development, 4, 439–453 (NB: Accepted May, 2011. Published online, December, 2011). PDF

Phillips, B., Seston, R. & Kelemen, D. (2012). Learning about tool categories via eavesdropping. Child Development, 83, 2057–2072. PDF

Donovan, E. & Kelemen, D. (2011). Just rewards: Children and adults equate accidental inequity with intentional unfairness. Journal of Cognition and Culture, 11, 137–150. PDF

Dennis, T. A. & Kelemen, D. (2009). Children’s views on emotion regulation: Functional links and implications for socio-emotional adjustment. International Journal of Behavioral Development, 33, 243–252. PDF

Kelemen, D. & Rosset, E. (2009). The Human Function Compunction: Teleological explanation in adults. Cognition, 111, 138–143. PDF

Casler, K. & Kelemen, D. (2008). Developmental continuity in the teleo-functional bias: Reasoning about nature among Romanian Roma adults (Gypsies). Journal of Cognition and Development, 9, 340–362. PDF

DiYanni, C. & Kelemen, D. (2008). Using a bad tool with good intention: Young children’s imitation of adults’ questionable choices. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology: Special Issue on Imitation, 101, 241–261. PDF

Casler, K. & Kelemen, D. (2007). Reasoning about artifacts at 24 months: The developing teleo-functional stance. Cognition, 103, 120–130. PDF

Kelemen, D. & Carey, S. (2007). The essence of artifacts: Developing the design stance. In S. Laurence & E. Margolis (Eds.), Creations of the Mind: Theories of artifacts and their representation. Oxford: Oxford University Press. PDF

Kelemen, D. & Carey, S. (2007). Az artefaktumok (eszközök) esszenciája. A tervezeti hozzáállás kialakulása. Magyar Pszichológiai Szemle, 62, 131–159.

Lombrozo, T., Kelemen, D. & Zaitchik, D. (2007). Inferring design: Evidence of a preference for teleological explanations in patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Psychological Science, 18, 999–1006. PDF

Casler, K. & Kelemen, D. (2005). Young children’s rapid learning about artifacts. Developmental Science, 8, 472–480. PDF

DiYanni, C. & Kelemen, D. (2005). Time to get a new mountain? The role of function in children’s conceptions of natural kinds. Cognition, 97, 325–335. PDF

Kelemen, D., Callanan, M., Casler, K. & Pérez-Granados, D. R. (2005). Why things happen: Teleological explanation in parent-child conversations. Developmental Psychology, 41, 251–264.PDF

Kelemen, D. & DiYanni, C. (2005). Intuitions about origins: Purpose and intelligent design in children’s reasoning about nature. Journal of Cognition and Development, 6, 3–31. PDF

Kelemen, D. (2004). Counterintuition, existential anxiety, and religion as a by-product of the designing mind. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 27, 739–740. PDF

Kelemen, D. (2004). Are children “intuitive theists”?: Reasoning about purpose and design in nature. Psychological Science, 15, 295–301. Reprinted in Wilkins, J. S. (Ed.), Intelligent design and religion as a natural phenomenon (2010). Ashgate Press. PDF

Kelemen, D. (2003). British and American children’s preferences for teleological-functional explanations of the natural world. Cognition, 8, 201–221. PDF

Kelemen, D., Widdowson, D., Posner, T., Brown, A. L. & Casler, K. (2003). Teleo-functional constraints on preschool children’s reasoning about living things. Developmental Science, 6, 329–345. PDF

Kelemen, D. (1999). Beliefs about purpose: On the origins of teleological thought. In M. Corballis and S. Lea (Eds.), The Descent of Mind. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Kelemen, D. (1999). Functions, goals and intentions: Children’s teleological reasoning about objects. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 12, 461–468. PDF

Kelemen, D. (1999). The scope of teleological thinking in preschool children. Cognition, 70, 241–272. PDF

Kelemen, D. (1999). Why are rocks pointy?: Children’s preference for teleological explanations of the natural world. Developmental Psychology, 35, 1440–1453. PDF

Bloom, P. & Kelemen, D. (1995). Syntactic cues in the acquisition of collective nouns. Cognition, 56, 1–30. PDF

Bloom, P., Kelemen, D., Fountain, A. & Courtney, E. (1995). The acquisition of collective nouns. In D. MacLaughlin and S. McEwen (Eds.), The Proceedings of the 19th Boston University Conference on Language Development. Cascadilla Press.

Bloom, P. & Kelemen, D. (1995). Syntactic and conceptual factors in the acquisition of collective nouns. In E. Clark (Ed.), The Proceedings of the Twenty-Sixth Annual Child Language Research Forum. Stanford: CSLI.

Kelemen, D. & Bloom, P. (1994). Domain-specific knowledge in simple categorization tasks. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 1, 390–395. PDF

Manstead, A. S. R., Parker, D., Stradling, S. G., Reason, J. T., Baxter, J. S. & Kelemen, D. (1992). Perceived consensus in estimates of the prevalence of driving errors and violations. Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 22, 509–530.

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